Browsing by Subject "TRIALS"

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  • Hemilä, Harri (2008)
    In their paper discussing the importance of double-blinding in controlled trials, Furberg and Soliman stated that one of the established and fundamental principles for avoiding the problem of bias is to keep the study participants and the investigators blinded, or masked, to the identity of the assigned interventions. As a support to this argument they described the subgroup findings of Karlowski et al.s trial, which examined the effect of vitamin C supplementation on the commoncold[2,3]. Furberg and Soliman put a great weight on the importance of double-blinding, yet they are lax on other fundamental principles of controlled trial.
  • CVD-REAL Investigators Study Grp; Khunti, Kamlesh; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Kim, Dae Jung; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fenici, Peter (2021)
    Background Randomized, controlled cardiovascular outcome trials may not be fully representative of the management of patients with type 2 diabetes across different geographic regions. We conducted analyses of data from the multinational CVD-REAL consortium to determine the association between initiation of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2i) and cardiovascular outcomes, including subgroup analyses based on patient characteristics. Methods De-identified health records from 13 countries across three continents were used to identify patients newly-initiated on SGLT-2i or other glucose-lowering drugs (oGLDs). Propensity scores for SGLT-2i initiation were developed in each country, with 1:1 matching for oGLD initiation. In the matched groups hazard ratios (HRs) for hospitalization for heart failure (HHF), all-cause death (ACD), the composite of HHF or ACD, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke were estimated by country, and pooled using a weighted meta-analysis. Multiple subgroup analyses were conducted across patient demographic and clinical characteristics to examine any heterogeneity in treatment effects. Results Following matching, 440,599 new users of SGLT-2i and oGLDs were included in each group. Mean follow-up time was 396 days for SGLT-2i initiation and 406 days for oGLDs initiation. SGLT-2i initiation was associated with a lower risk of HHF (HR: 0.66, 95%CI 0.58-0.75; p < 0.001), ACD (HR: 0.52, 95%CI 0.45-0.60; p < 0.001), the composite of HHF or ACD (HR: 0.60, 95%CI 0.53-0.68; p < 0.001), MI (HR: 0.85, 95%CI 0.78-0.92; p < 0.001), and stroke (HR: 0.78, 95%CI 0.72-0.85; p < 0.001); regardless of patient characteristics, including established cardiovascular disease, or geographic region. Conclusions This CVD-REAL study extends the findings from the SGLT-2i clinical trials to the broader setting of an ethnically and geographically diverse population, and across multiple subgroups. Trial registration NCT02993614
  • Hemminki, Elina; Virtanen, Jorma; Veerus, Piret; Regushevskaya, Elena (2013)
  • Hynninen, J.; Laasik, M.; Vallius, T.; Kemppainen, J.; Grönroos, S.; Virtanen, J.; Casado, J.; Hautaniemi, S.; Grenman, S.; Seppänen, M.; Auranen, A. (2018)
    Aims: To prospectively evaluate the use of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG-PET/CT) in the definition of the treatment response after primary treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Materials and methods: Forty-nine patients with advanced EOC had an F-18-FDG PET/CT scan before and after primary treatment. The treatment response was defined with the currently used radiological and serological Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST1.1/GCIC) criteria and the modified PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST). The concordance of the two methods was analysed. If the patient had a complete response to primary treatment by conventional criteria, the end of treatment F-18-FDG PET/CT scan (etPET/CT) was not opened until retrospectively at the time of disease progression. The ability of etPET/CT to predict the time to disease recurrence was analysed. The recurrence patterns were observed with an F-18-FDG PET/CT at the first relapse. Results: The agreement of the RECIST1.1/GCIC and modified PERCIST criteria in defining the primary treatment response in the whole patient cohort was good (weighted kappa coefficient = 0.78 ). Of the complete responders (n = 28), 34% had metabolically active lesions present in the etPET/CT, most typically in the lymph nodes. The same anatomical sites tended to activate at disease relapse, but were seldom the only site of relapse. In patients with widespread intra-abdominal carsinosis at diagnosis, the definition of metabolic response was challenging due to problems in distinguishing the physiological FDG accumulation in the bowel loops from the residual tumour in the same area. The presence of metabolically active lesions in the etPET/CT did not predict earlier disease relapse in the complete responders. Conclusions: In the present study, etPET/CT revealed metabolically active lesions in complete responders after EOC primary therapy, but they were insignificant for the patient's prognosis. The current study does not favour routine use of F-18-FDG PET/CT after EOC primary treatment for complete responders. (C) 2018 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Athanasiou, Antonios; Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Efthimiou, Orestis; Kalliala, Ilkka; Naci, Huseyin; Bowden, Sarah; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre; Bennett, Philip; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Salanti, Georgia; Kyrgiou, Maria (2019)
    Introduction Local treatments for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and microinvasive disease remove or ablate a cone-shaped part of the uterine cervix containing the abnormal cells. A trend toward less radical techniques has raised concerns that this may adversely impact the rates of precancerous and cancerous recurrence. However, there has been no strong evidence to support such claims. We hereby describe a protocol of a systematic review and network meta-analysis that will update the evidence and compare all relevant treatments in terms of efficacy and complications. Methods and analysis Literature searches in electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE) or trial registries will identify published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies comparing the efficacy and complications among different excisional and ablative techniques. The excisional techniques include cold knife, laser or Fischer cone, large loop or needle excision of the transformation zone and the ablative radical point diathermy, cryotherapy, cold coagulation or laser ablation. The primary outcome will be residual/recurrent disease defined as abnormal histology or cytology of any grade, while secondary outcomes will include treatment failure rates defined as high-grade histology or cytology, histologically confirmed CIN1+ or histologically confirmed CIN2+, human papillomavirus positivity rates, involved margins rates, bleeding and cervical stenosis rates. We will assess the risk of bias in RCTs and observational studies using tools developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors will independently assess study eligibility, abstract the data and assess the risk of bias. Random-effects meta-analyses and network meta-analyses will be conducted using the OR for dichotomous outcomes and the mean difference for continuous outcomes. The quality of the evidence for the primary outcome will be assessed using the CINeMA (Confidence In Network Meta-Analysis) tool. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required. We will disseminate findings to clinicians, policy-makers, patients and the public. PROSPERO registration number CRD42018115508.
  • Athanasiou, Antonios; Veroniki, Areti Angeliki; Efthimiou, Orestis; Kalliala, Ilkka; Naci, Huseyin; Bowden, Sarah; Paraskevaidi, Maria; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre; Bennett, Philip; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Salanti, Georgia; Kyrgiou, Maria (2019)
    Introduction There are several local treatment methods for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia that remove or ablate a cone-shaped part of the uterine cervix. There is evidence to suggest that these increase the risk of preterm birth (PTB) and that this is higher for techniques that remove larger parts of the cervix, although the data are conflicting. We present a protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) that will update the evidence and compare all treatments in terms of fertility and pregnancy complications. Methods and analysis We will search electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE) from inception till October 2019, in order to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cohort studies comparing the fertility and pregnancy outcomes among different excisional and ablative treatment techniques and/or to untreated controls. The primary outcome will be PTB ( Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required. Results will be disseminated to academic beneficiaries, medical practitioners, patients and the public.
  • Hemilä, Harri (2007)
    Experts of controlled clinical trials argue that decisions on medical interventions should be based on clinically relevant outcomes and not on surrogates such as laboratory measurements. There are quite a few examples in which the effect on a surrogate end point substantially diverged from the effect on a clinically relevant outcome. In this respect, the recent paper by Bruno et al. is problematic as it proposed higher vitamin E intakes for smokers on the basis of greater disappearance rate of alpha-tocopherol in the plasma of smokers. The disappearance rate is a surrogate end point with no validated relation to any clinically relevant outcome.
  • MASK Study GroupJr; Bedard, Annabelle; Anto, Josep M.; Fonseca, Joao A.; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Basagana, Xavier (2020)
    Background In allergic rhinitis, a relevant outcome providing information on the effectiveness of interventions is needed. In MASK-air (Mobile Airways Sentinel Network), a visual analogue scale (VAS) for work is used as a relevant outcome. This study aimed to assess the performance of the work VAS work by comparing VAS work with other VAS measurements and symptom-medication scores obtained concurrently. Methods All consecutive MASK-air users in 23 countries from 1 June 2016 to 31 October 2018 were included (14 189 users; 205 904 days). Geolocalized users self-assessed daily symptom control using the touchscreen functionality on their smart phone to click on VAS scores (ranging from 0 to 100) for overall symptoms (global), nose, eyes, asthma and work. Two symptom-medication scores were used: the modified EAACI CSMS score and the MASK control score for rhinitis. To assess data quality, the intra-individual response variability (IRV) index was calculated. Results A strong correlation was observed between VAS work and other VAS. The highest levels for correlation with VAS work and variance explained in VAS work were found with VAS global, followed by VAS nose, eye and asthma. In comparison with VAS global, the mCSMS and MASK control score showed a lower correlation with VAS work. Results are unlikely to be explained by a low quality of data arising from repeated VAS measures. Conclusions VAS work correlates with other outcomes (VAS global, nose, eye and asthma) but less well with a symptom-medication score. VAS work should be considered as a potentially useful AR outcome in intervention studies.
  • Solomon, Alina; Handels, Ron; Wimo, Anders; Antikainen, Riitta; Laatikainen, Tiina; Levälahti, Esko; Peltonen, Markku; Soininen, Hilkka; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Kivipelto, Miia; Ngandu, Tiia (2021)
    We investigated the effect of a multidomain lifestyle intervention on the risk of dementia estimated using the validated CAIDE risk score (post-hoc analysis). The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) is a 2-year randomized controlled trial among 1,260 at-risk older adults (60-77 years). Difference in the estimated mean change in CAIDE score at 2 years in the intervention compared to the control group was -0.16 (95 % CI -0.31 to 0.00) (p = 0.013), corresponding to a relative dementia risk reduction between 6.04-6.50%. This could be interpreted as a reflection of the prevention potential of the intervention.
  • Schalekamp-Timmermans, Sarah; Arends, Lidia R.; Alsaker, Elin; Chappell, Lucy; Hansson, Stefan; Harsem, Nina K.; Jalmby, Maya; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Laivuori, Hannele; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Magnus, Per; Myers, Jenny; Olsen, Jorn; Poston, Lucilla; Redman, Christopher W.; Staff, Anne C.; Villa, Pia; Roberts, James M.; Steegers, Eric A.; Global Pregnancy Collaboration (2017)
    Background: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a major pregnancy disorder complicating up to 8% of pregnancies. Increasing evidence indicates a sex-specific interplay between the mother,placenta and fetus. This may lead to different adaptive mechanisms during pregnancy. Methods: We performed an individual participant data meta-analysis to determine associations of fetal sex and PE, with specific focus on gestational age at delivery in PE. This was done on 219 575 independent live-born singleton pregnancies, with a gestational age at birth between 22.0 and 43.0 weeks of gestation, from 11 studies participating in a worldwide consortium of international research groups focusing on pregnancy. Results: Of the women, 9033 (4.1%) experienced PE in their pregnancy and 48.8% of the fetuses were female versus 51.2% male. No differences in the female/male distribution were observed with respect to term PE (delivered >= 37 weeks). Preterm PE (delivered <37 weeks) was slightly more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus than in pregnancies with a male fetus [odds ratio (OR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.21]. Very preterm PE (delivered <34 weeks) was even more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus as compared with pregnancies with a male fetus (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.17-1.59). Conclusions: Sexual dimorphic differences in the occurrence of PE exist, with preterm PE being more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus as compared with pregnancies with a male fetus and with no differences with respect to term PE.
  • Schalekamp-Timmermans, Sarah; Arends, Lidia R.; Alsaker, Elin; Chappell, Lucy; Hansson, Stefan; Harsem, Nina K.; Jalmby, Maya; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Laivuori, Hannele; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Magnus, Per; Myers, Jenny; Olsen, Jorn; Poston, Lucilla; Redman, Christopher W.; Staff, Anne C.; Villa, Pia; Roberts, James M.; Steegers, Eric A.; Global Pregnancy Collaboration (Oxford University Press, 2017)
    Background: Pre-eclampsia (PE) is a major pregnancy disorder complicating up to 8% of pregnancies. Increasing evidence indicates a sex-specific interplay between the mother,placenta and fetus. This may lead to different adaptive mechanisms during pregnancy. Methods: We performed an individual participant data meta-analysis to determine associations of fetal sex and PE, with specific focus on gestational age at delivery in PE. This was done on 219 575 independent live-born singleton pregnancies, with a gestational age at birth between 22.0 and 43.0 weeks of gestation, from 11 studies participating in a worldwide consortium of international research groups focusing on pregnancy. Results: Of the women, 9033 (4.1%) experienced PE in their pregnancy and 48.8% of the fetuses were female versus 51.2% male. No differences in the female/male distribution were observed with respect to term PE (delivered >= 37 weeks). Preterm PE (delivered <37 weeks) was slightly more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus than in pregnancies with a male fetus [odds ratio (OR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.21]. Very preterm PE (delivered <34 weeks) was even more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus as compared with pregnancies with a male fetus (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.17-1.59). Conclusions: Sexual dimorphic differences in the occurrence of PE exist, with preterm PE being more prevalent among pregnancies with a female fetus as compared with pregnancies with a male fetus and with no differences with respect to term PE.
  • Vermeulen, Eric; van den Anker, John N.; Della Pasqua, Oscar; Hoppu, Kaarlo; van der Lee, Johanna H.; GRiP (2017)
    Objectives In children, there is often lack of sufficient information concerning the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a study drug to support dose selection and effective evaluation of efficacy in a randomised clinical trial (RCT). Therefore, one should consider the relevance of relatively small PKPD studies, which can provide the appropriate data to optimise the design of an RCT. Methods Based on the experience of experts collaborating in the EU-funded Global Research in Paediatrics consortium, we aimed to inform clinician-scientists working with children on the design of investigator-initiated PKPD studies. Key findings The importance of the identification of an optimal dose for the paediatric population is explained, followed by the differences and similarities of dose-ranging and efficacy studies. The input of clinical pharmacologists with modelling expertise is essential for an efficient dose-finding study. Conclusions The emergence of new laboratory techniques and statistical tools allows for the collection and analysis of sparse and unbalanced data, enabling the implementation of (observational) PKPD studies in the paediatric clinic. Understanding of the principles and methods discussed in this study is essential to improve the quality of paediatric PKPD investigations, and to prevent the conduct of paediatric RCTs that fail because of inadequate dosing.
  • Venekamp, Roderick P.; Hoogland, Jeroen; van Smeden, Maarten; Rovers, Maroeska M.; De Sutter, An; Merenstein, Daniel; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Kaiser, Laurent; Liira, Helena; Little, Paul; Bucher, Heiner C. C.; Reitsma, Johannes B. (2021)
    Introduction Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) is a prime reason for doctor visits and among the conditions with highest antibiotic overprescribing rates in adults. To reduce inappropriate prescribing, we aim to predict the absolute benefit of antibiotic treatment for individual adult patients with ARS by applying multivariable risk prediction methods to individual patient data (IPD) of multiple randomised placebo-controlled trials. Methods and analysis This is an update and re-analysis of a 2008 IPD meta-analysis on antibiotics for adults with clinically diagnosed ARS. First, the reference list of the 2018 Cochrane review on antibiotics for ARS will be reviewed for relevant studies published since 2008. Next, the systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase of the Cochrane review will be updated to 1 September 2020. Methodological quality of eligible studies will be assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2 tool. The primary outcome is cure at 8-15 days. Regression-based methods will be used to model the risk of being cured based on relevant predictors and treatment, while accounting for clustering. Such model allows for risk predictions as a function of treatment and individual patient characteristics and hence gives insight into individualised absolute benefit. Candidate predictors will be based on literature, clinical reasoning and availability. Calibration and discrimination will be evaluated to assess model performance. Resampling techniques will be used to assess internal validation. In addition, internal-external cross-validation procedures will be used to inform on between-study differences and estimate out-of-sample model performance. Secondarily, we will study possible heterogeneity of treatment effect as a function of outcome risk. Ethics and dissemination In this study, no identifiable patient data will be used. As such, the Medical Research Involving Humans Subject Act (WMO) does not apply and official ethical approval is not required. Results will be submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed journals. PROSPERO registration number CRD42020220108.
  • ESO Hlth Econ Working Grp; Cadilhac, Dominique A.; Kim, Joosup; Wilsno, Alastair; Meretoja, Atte; Lees, Kennedy R. (2020)
    Introduction Approaches to economic evaluations of stroke therapies are varied and inconsistently described. An objective of the European Stroke Organisation (ESO) Health Economics Working Group is to standardise and improve the economic evaluations of interventions for stroke. Methods The ESO Health Economics Working Group and additional experts were contacted to develop a protocol and a guidance document for data collection for economic evaluations of stroke therapies. A modified Delphi approach, including a survey and consensus processes, was used to agree on content. We also asked the participants about resources that could be shared to improve economic evaluations of interventions for stroke. Results Of 28 experts invited, 16 (57%) completed the initial survey, with representation from universities, government, and industry. More than half of the survey respondents endorsed 13 specific items to include in a standard resource use questionnaire. Preferred functional/quality of life outcome measures to use for economic evaluations were the modified Rankin Scale (14 respondents, 88%) and the EQ-5D instrument (11 respondents, 69%). Of the 12 respondents who had access to data used in economic evaluations, 10 (83%) indicated a willingness to share data. A protocol template and a guidance document for data collection were developed and are presented in this article. Conclusion The protocol template and guidance document for data collection will support a more standardised and transparent approach for economic evaluations of stroke care.
  • Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Fransson, Eleonor I.; Alfredsson, Lars; De Bacquer, Dirk; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Bonenfant, Sebastien; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Clays, Els; Casini, Annalisa; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A.; Goldberg, Marcel; Hooftman, Wendela E.; Houtman, Irene L.; Joensuu, Matti; Joeckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Koskinen, Aki; Kouvonen, Anne; Leineweber, Constanze; Lunau, Thorsten; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson; Marmot, Michael G.; Nielsen, Martin L.; Nordin, Maria; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Rugulies, Reiner; Steptoe, Andrew; Siegrist, Johannes; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Vaananen, Ari; Westerholm, Peter; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Theorell, Tores; Hamer, Mark; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David; Kivimäki, Mika; IPD Work Consortium (2012)
  • Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Fransson, Eleonor I.; Alfredsson, Lars; De Bacquer, Dirk; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Bonenfant, Sebastien; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Clays, Els; Casini, Annalisa; Dragano, Nico; Erbel, Raimund; Geuskens, Goedele A.; Goldberg, Marcel; Hooftman, Wendela E.; Houtman, Irene L.; Joensuu, Matti; Joeckel, Karl-Heinz; Kittel, France; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Koskinen, Aki; Kouvonen, Anne; Leineweber, Constanze; Lunau, Thorsten; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Hanson, Linda L. Magnusson; Marmot, Michael G.; Nielsen, Martin L.; Nordin, Maria; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Rugulies, Reiner; Steptoe, Andrew; Siegrist, Johannes; Suominen, Sakari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Vaananen, Ari; Westerholm, Peter; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Theorell, Tores; Hamer, Mark; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David; Kivimaeki, Mika; IPD Work Consortium (2012)
  • Eskelund, Christian Winther; Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra; Kolstad, Arne; Laurell, Anna; Räty, Riikka; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Geisler, Christian Hartmann; Jerkeman, Mats; Gronbaek, Kirsten (2018)
  • Kauppi, Paula; Bachour, Patrick; Maasilta, Paula; Bachour, Adel (2016)
    Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea cause sleep disturbance, daytime sleepiness and diminished quality of life. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is efficient in reducing symptoms related to sleep apnoea. Here we report the impact of long-term use of CPAP on asthma symptoms. A survey questionnaire was distributed to all of our obstructive sleep apnoea patients with CPAP therapy in 2013. We used the Finnish version of the Asthma Control Test (TM) (ACT) and a visual analogue scale (0 = no symptoms, 100 = severe asthma symptoms). Asthma was defined as self-reported physician-diagnosed disease and a special reimbursement for asthma medication by the Social Insurance Institution. We sent 2577 questionnaires and received 1586 answers (61 %). One hundred ninety-seven patients were asthmatics with a prevalence of asthma among CPAP users of 13 %. We studied 152 patients (58 females) whose CPAP therapy was initiated after starting asthma medication. Their mean (SD) age was 62 (10) years, duration of CPAP 5.7 (4.7) years and their CPAP daily use was 6.3 (2.4) h. Self-reported asthma severity decreased significantly from 48.3 (29.6) to 33.1 (27.4) (p <0.001), and ACT score increased significantly from 15.35 (5.3) to 19.8 (4.6) (p <0.001) without a significant change in the body mass index (BMI). The percentage of patients using rescue medication daily reduced from 36 to 8 % with CPAP (P <0.001). We noticed a significant decrease in asthma symptoms with long-term use of CPAP in patients with both asthma and obstructive sleep apnoea.
  • Rauma, Ville; Salo, Jarmo; Sintonen, Harri; Räsänen, Jari Veli; Ilonen, Ilkka (2016)
    Background: This study presents a retrospective evaluation of patient, disease, and treatment features predicting long-term survival and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients who underwent surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between January 2000 and June 2009, 586 patients underwent surgery at the Helsinki University Hospital. The 276 patients still alive in June 2011 received two validated quality of life questionnaires (QLQ): the generic 15D and the cancer-specific EORTC QLQ-C30 + QLQ-LC13. We used binary and linear regression analysis modeling to identify patient, disease, and treatment characteristics that predicted survival and long-term HRQoL. Results: When taking into account patient, disease, and treatment characteristics, long-term survival was quite predictable (69.5% correct), but no long-term HRQoL (R-2 between 0.041 and 0.119). Advanced age at the time of surgery, male gender, comorbidity (measured with the Charlson comorbidity index), clinical and pathological stages II-IV, and postoperative infectious complications predicted a lower survival rate. Features associated with poorer long-term HRQoL (measured with the 15D) were comorbidity, postoperative complications, and the use of the video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) technique. Conclusions: Long-term HRQoL is only moderately predictable, while prediction of long-term survival is more reliable. Lower HRQoL is associated with comorbidities, complications, use of the VATS technique, and reduced pulmonary function, while adjuvant therapy is associated with higher HRQoL.