Browsing by Subject "TRICHODERMA-REESEI"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-10 of 10
  • Pakarinen, Annukka; Haven, Mai Ostergaard; Djajadi, Demi Tristan; Varnai, Aniko; Puranen, Terhi; Viikari, Liisa (2014)
  • Mäkelä, Miia R.; Bouzid, Ourdia; Robl, Diogo; Post, Harm; Peng, Mao; Heck, Albert; Altelaar, Maarten; de Vries, Ronald P. (2017)
    The coprophilic ascomycete fungus Podospora anserina was cultivated on three different plant biomasses, i.e. cotton seed hulls (CSH), soybean hulls (SBH) and acid-pretreated wheat straw (WS) for four days, and the potential of the produced enzyme mixtures was compared in the enzymatic saccharification of the corresponding lignocellulose feedstocks. The enzyme cocktail P. anserina produced after three days of growth on SBH showed superior capacity to release reducing sugars from all tested plant biomass feedstocks compared to the enzyme mixtures from CSH and WS cultures. Detailed proteomics analysis of the culture supernatants revealed that SBH contained the most diverse set of enzymes targeted on plant cell wall polymers and was particularly abundant in xylan, mannan and pectin acting enzymes. The importance of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) in plant biomass deconstruction was supported by identification of 20 out of 33 AA9 LPMOs in the SBH cultures. The results highlight the suitability of P. anserina as a source of plant cell wall degrading enzymes for biotechnological applications and the importance of selecting the most optimal substrate for the production of enzyme mixtures. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Kun, Roland; Gomes, Ana Carolina S.; Hilden, Sari Kristiina; Salazar Cerezo, Sonia; Mäkelä, Miia Riitta; de Vries, Ronald (2019)
    Fungal strain engineering is commonly used in many areas of biotechnology, including the production of plant biomass degrading enzymes. Its aim varies from the production of specific enzymes to overall increased enzyme production levels and modification of the composition of the enzyme set that is produced by the fungus. Strain engineering involves a diverse range of methodologies, including classical mutagenesis, genetic engineering and genome editing. In this review, the main approaches for strain engineering of filamentous fungi in the field of plant biomass degradation will be discussed, including recent and not yet implemented methods, such as CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing and adaptive evolution.
  • Varnai, Aniko; Costa, Thales H. F.; Faulds, Craig B.; Milagres, Adriane M. F.; Siika-aho, Matti; Ferraz, Andre (2014)
    Background: Sugar cane internodes can be divided diagonally into four fractions, of which the two innermost ones are the least recalcitrant pith and the moderately accessible pith-rind interface. These fractions differ in enzymatic hydrolyzability due to structural differences. In general, cellulose hydrolysis in plants is hindered by its physical interaction with hemicellulose and lignin. Lignin is believed to be linked covalently to hemicellulose through hydroxycinnamic acids, forming a compact matrix around the polysaccharides. Acetyl xylan esterase and three feruloyl esterases were evaluated for their potential to fragment the lignocellulosic network in sugar cane and to indirectly increase the accessibility of cellulose. Results: The hydrolyzability of the pith and pith-rind interface fractions of a low-lignin-containing sugar cane clone (H58) was compared to that of a reference cultivar (RC). Acetyl xylan esterase enhanced the rate and overall yield of cellulose and xylan hydrolysis in all four substrates. Of the three feruloyl esterases tested, only TsFaeC was capable of releasing p-coumaric acid, while AnFaeA and NcFaeD released ferulic acid from both the pith and interface fractions. Ferulic acid release was higher from the less recalcitrant clone (H58)/fraction (pith), whereas more p-coumaric acid was released from the clone (RC)/fraction (interface) with a higher lignin content. In addition, a compositional analysis of the four fractions revealed that p-coumaroyl content correlated with lignin, while feruloyl content correlated with arabinose content, suggesting different esterification patterns of these two hydroxycinnamic acids. Despite the extensive release of phenolic acids, feruloyl esterases only moderately promoted enzyme access to cellulose or xylan. Conclusions: Acetyl xylan esterase TrAXE was more efficient in enhancing the overall saccharification of sugar cane, compared to the feruloyl esterases AnFaeA, TsFaeC, and NcFaeD. The hydroxycinnamic acid composition of sugar cane fractions and the hydrolysis data together suggest that feruloyl groups are more likely to decorate xylan, while p-coumaroyl groups are rather linked to lignin. The three different feruloyl esterases had distinct product profiles on non-pretreated sugar cane substrate, indicating that sugar cane pith could function as a possible natural substrate for feruloyl esterase activity measurements. Hydrolysis data suggest that TsFaeC was able to release p-coumaroyl groups esterifying lignin.
  • Wang, Zhao; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Hedenström, Mattias; Chong, Sun-Li; Tenkanen, Maija; Jönsson, Leif J.; Mellerowicz, Ewa (2020)
    Fast-growing broad-leaf tree species can serve as feedstocks for production of bio-based chemicals and fuels through biochemical conversion of wood to monosaccharides. This conversion is hampered by the xylan acetylation pattern. To reduce xylan acetylation in the wood, the Hypocrea jecorina acetyl xylan esterase (HjAXE) from carbohydrate esterase (CE) family 5 was expressed in hybrid aspen under the control of the wood-specific PtGT43B promoter and targeted to the secretory pathway. The enzyme was predicted to deacetylate polymeric xylan in the vicinity of cellulose due to the presence of a cellulose-binding module. Cell-wall-bound protein fractions from developing wood of transgenic plants were capable of releasing acetyl from finely ground wood powder, indicative of active AXE present in cell walls of these plants, whereas no such activity was detected in wild-type plants. The transgenic lines grew in height and diameter as well as wild-type trees, whereas their internodes were slightly shorter, indicating higher leaf production. The average acetyl content in the wood of these lines was reduced by 13%, mainly due to reductions in di-acetylated xylose units, and in C-2 and C-3 mono-acetylated xylose units. Analysis of soluble cell wall polysaccharides revealed a 4% reduction in the fraction of xylose units and an 18% increase in the fraction of glucose units, whereas the contents of cellulose and lignin were not affected. Enzymatic saccharification of wood from transgenic plants resulted in 27% higher glucose yield than for wild-type plants. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and Simons' staining pointed toward larger surface area and improved cellulose accessibility for wood from transgenic plants compared to wood from wild-type plants, which could be achieved by HjAXE deacetylating xylan bound to cellulose. The results show that CE5 family can serve as a source of enzymes for in planta reduction of recalcitrance to saccharification.
  • Magarkar, Aniket; Mele, Nawel; Abdel-Rahman, Noha; Butcher, Sarah; Torkkeli, Mika; Serimaa, Ritva; Paananen, Arja; Linder, Markus; Bunker, Alex (2014)
  • Karlsson, Magnus; Durling, Mikael Brandstrom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Kosawang, Chatchai; Lackner, Gerald; Tzelepis, Georgios D.; Nygren, Kristiina; Dubey, Mukesh K.; Kamou, Nathalie; Levasseur, Anthony; Zapparata, Antonio; Wang, Jinhui; Amby, Daniel Buchvaldt; Jensen, Birgit; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Panteris, Emmanuel; Lagopodi, Anastasia L.; Poeggeler, Stefanie; Vannacci, Giovanni; Collinge, David B.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Henrissat, Bernard; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Jensen, Dan Funck (2015)
  • Cononi Linares, Nancy; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Stålbrand, Henrik; Mäkelä, Miia; de Vries, Ronald (2020)
    alpha-Galactosidases are important industrial enzymes for hemicellulosic biomass degradation or modification. In this study, six novel extracellular alpha-galactosidases from Penicillium subrubescens were produced in Pichia pastoris and characterized. All alpha-galactosidases exhibited high affinity to pNP alpha Gal, and only AglE was not active towards galacto-oligomers. Especially AglB and AglD released high amounts of galactose from guar gum, carob galactomannan and locust bean, but combining alpha-galactosidases with an endomannanase dramatically improved galactose release. Structural comparisons to other alpha-galactosidases and homology modelling showed high sequence similarities, albeit significant differences in mechanisms of productive binding, including discrimination between various galactosides. To our knowledge, this is the first study of such an extensive repertoire of extracellular fungal alpha-galactosidases, to demonstrate their potential for degradation of galactomannan-rich biomass. These findings contribute to understanding the differences within glycoside hydrolase families, to facilitate the development of new strategies to generate tailor-made enzymes for new industrial bioprocesses.
  • EFSA Panel Dietetic Products Nutr (2018)
    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on a mixture of xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS) as a novel food (NF) pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2015/2283. The NF is obtained from corncobs (Zea mays subsp. mays) via enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis and subsequent purification. The main components of the NF, the oligosaccharides, are resistant to human digestive enzymes and are fermented by colonic bacteria. The intention is to add the NF to a variety of foods such as bakery and dairy products, fruit jelly, chocolates and soy-drinks. The information provided on composition, specifications, production process and stability of the NF, does not raise safety concerns. There were effects observed in the animal studies with the NF or with other XOS which were considered by the Panel to be expected from the intake of non-digestible carbohydrates. The Panel notes that the acute and transient gastrointestinal observed in human intervention studies with the NF or with other XOS have also been associated with the consumption of other non-digestible carbohydrates. The Panel concludes that the NF, a mixture of XOS, is safe under the proposed uses and use levels. The target population is the general population. (C) 2018 European Food Safety Authority. EFSA Journal published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd on behalf of European Food Safety Authority.