Browsing by Subject "TROPICAL FORESTS"

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  • Flechard, Chris R.; Ibrom, Andreas; Skiba, Ute M.; de Vries, Wim; van Oijen, Marcel; Cameron, David R.; Dise, Nancy B.; Korhonen, Janne F. J.; Buchmann, Nina; Legout, Arnaud; Simpson, David; Sanz, Maria J.; Aubinet, Marc; Loustau, Denis; Montagnani, Leonardo; Neirynck, Johan; Janssens, Ivan A.; Pihlatie, Mari; Kiese, Ralf; Siemens, Jan; Francez, Andre-Jean; Augustin, Juergen; Varlagin, Andrej; Olejnik, Janusz; Juszczak, Radoslaw; Aurela, Mika; Berveiller, Daniel; Chojnicki, Bogdan H.; Dammgen, Ulrich; Delpierre, Nicolas; Djuricic, Vesna; Drewer, Julia; Dufrene, Eric; Eugster, Werner; Fauvel, Yannick; Fowler, David; Frumau, Arnoud; Granier, Andre; Gross, Patrick; Hamon, Yannick; Helfter, Carole; Hensen, Arjan; Horvath, Laszlo; Kitzler, Barbara; Kruijt, Bart; Kutsch, Werner L.; Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel; Lohila, Annalea; Longdoz, Bernard; Marek, Michal; Matteucci, Giorgio; Mitosinkova, Marta; Moreaux, Virginie; Neftel, Albrecht; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Pilegaard, Kim; Pita, Gabriel; Sanz, Francisco; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Sebastia, Maria-Teresa; Tang, Y. Sim; Uggerud, Hilde; Urbaniak, Marek; van Dijk, Netty; Vesala, Timo; Vidic, Sonja; Vincke, Caroline; Weidinger, Tamas; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Butterbach-Bah, Klaus; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark A. (2020)
    The impact of atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N-r) deposition on carbon (C) sequestration in soils and biomass of unfertilized, natural, semi-natural and forest ecosystems has been much debated. Many previous results of this dC/dN response were based on changes in carbon stocks from periodical soil and ecosystem inventories, associated with estimates of N-r deposition obtained from large-scale chemical transport models. This study and a companion paper (Flechard et al., 2020) strive to reduce uncertainties of N effects on C sequestration by linking multi-annual gross and net ecosystem productivity estimates from 40 eddy covariance flux towers across Europe to local measurement-based estimates of dry and wet N-r deposition from a dedicated collocated monitoring network. To identify possible ecological drivers and processes affecting the interplay between C and N-r inputs and losses, these data were also combined with in situ flux measurements of NO, N2O and CH4 fluxes; soil NO3- leaching sampling; and results of soil incubation experiments for N and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, as well as surveys of available data from online databases and from the literature, together with forest ecosystem (BAS-FOR) modelling. Multi-year averages of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) in forests ranged from -70 to 826 gCm(-2) yr(-1) at total wet + dry inorganic N-r deposition rates (N-dep) of 0.3 to 4.3 gNm(-2) yr(-1) and from -4 to 361 g Cm-2 yr(-1) at N-dep rates of 0.1 to 3.1 gNm(-2) yr(-1) in short semi-natural vegetation (moorlands, wetlands and unfertilized extensively managed grasslands). The GHG budgets of the forests were strongly dominated by CO2 exchange, while CH4 and N2O exchange comprised a larger proportion of the GHG balance in short semi-natural vegetation. Uncertainties in elemental budgets were much larger for nitrogen than carbon, especially at sites with elevated N-dep where N-r leaching losses were also very large, and compounded by the lack of reliable data on organic nitrogen and N-2 losses by denitrification. Nitrogen losses in the form of NO, N2O and especially NO3- were on average 27%(range 6 %-54 %) of N-dep at sites with N-dep <1 gNm(-2) yr(-1) versus 65% (range 35 %-85 %) for N-dep > 3 gNm(-2) yr(-1). Such large levels of N-r loss likely indicate that different stages of N saturation occurred at a number of sites. The joint analysis of the C and N budgets provided further hints that N saturation could be detected in altered patterns of forest growth. Net ecosystem productivity increased with N-r deposition up to 2-2.5 gNm(-2) yr(-1), with large scatter associated with a wide range in carbon sequestration efficiency (CSE, defined as the NEP/GPP ratio). At elevated N-dep levels (> 2.5 gNm(-2) yr(-1)), where inorganic N-r losses were also increasingly large, NEP levelled off and then decreased. The apparent increase in NEP at low to intermediate N-dep levels was partly the result of geographical cross-correlations between N-dep and climate, indicating that the actual mean dC/dN response at individual sites was significantly lower than would be suggested by a simple, straightforward regression of NEP vs. N-dep.
  • Rocha, Ricardo; Ferreira, Diogo F.; Lopez-Baucells, Adria; Farneda, Fabio Z.; Carreiras, Joao M. B.; Palmeirim, Jorge M.; Meyer, Christoph F. J. (2017)
    Understanding the consequences of habitat modification on wildlife communities is central to the development of conservation strategies. However, albeit male and female individuals of numerous species are known to exhibit differences in habitat use, sex-specific responses to habitat modification remain little explored. Here, we used a landscape-scale fragmentation experiment to assess, separately for males and females, the effects of fragmentation on the abundance of Carollia perspicillata and Rhinophylla pumilio, two widespread Neotropical frugivorous bats. We predicted that sex-specific responses would arise from higher energetic requirements from pregnancy and lactation in females. Analyses were conducted independently for each season, and we further investigated the joint responses to local and landscape-scale metrics of habitat quality, composition, and configuration. Although males and females responded similarly to a fragmentation gradient composed by continuous forest, fragment interiors, edges, and matrix habitats, we found marked differences between sexes in habitat use for at least one of the seasons. Whereas the sex ratio varied little in continuous forest and fragment interiors, females were found to be more abundant than males in edge and matrix habitats. This difference was more prominent in the dry season, the reproductive season of both species. For both species, abundance responses to local-and landscape-scale predictors differed between sexes and again, differences were more pronounced in the dry season. The results suggest considerable sex-mediated responses to forest disruption and degradation in tropical bats and complement our understanding of the impacts of fragmentation on tropical forest vertebrate communities. Abstract in Portuguese is available with online material.
  • Maeda, Eduardo Eiji; Ma, Xuanlong; Wagner, Fabien Hubert; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Eamus, Derek; Huete, Alfredo (2017)
    Evapotranspiration (ET) of Amazon forests is a main driver of regional climate patterns and an important indicator of ecosystem functioning. Despite its importance, the seasonal variability of ET over Amazon forests, and its relationship with environmental drivers, is still poorly understood. In this study, we carry out a water balance approach to analyse seasonal patterns in ET and their relationships with water and energy drivers over five sub-basins across the Amazon Basin. We used in situ measurements of river discharge, and remotely sensed estimates of terrestrial water storage, rainfall, and solar radiation. We show that the characteristics of ET seasonality in all sub-basins differ in timing and magnitude. The highest mean annual ET was found in the northern Rio Negro basin (similar to 1497 mm year(-1)) and the lowest values in the Solimoes River basin (similar to 986 mm year(-1)). For the first time in a basin-scale study, using observational data, we show that factors limiting ET vary across climatic gradients in the Amazon, confirming local-scale eddy covariance studies. Both annual mean and seasonality in ET are driven by a combination of energy and water availability, as neither rainfall nor radiation alone could explain patterns in ET. In southern basins, despite seasonal rainfall deficits, deep root water uptake allows increasing rates of ET during the dry season, when radiation is usually higher than in the wet season. We demonstrate contrasting ET seasonality with satellite greenness across Amazon forests, with strong asynchronous relationships in ever-wet watersheds, and positive correlations observed in seasonally dry watersheds. Finally, we compared our results with estimates obtained by two ET models, and we conclude that neither of the two tested models could provide a consistent representation of ET seasonal patterns across the Amazon.
  • Ramos, Danielle Leal; Pizo, Marco Aurelio; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar; Cruz, Rafael Souza; Morales, Juan Manuel; Ovaskainen, Otso (2020)
    In a rapidly changing world, it is important to understand how environmental modifications by humans affect species behavior. This is not a simple task, since we need to deal with a multitude of species and the different external contexts that affect their behavior. Here, we investigate how interpatch short-distance movements of 73 common forest bird species can be predicted by forest cover and forest isolation. We modeled bird movement as a function of environmental covariates, species traits - body mass and feeding habit - and phylogenetic relationships using Joint Species Movement Models. We used field data collected in forest edges and open pastures of six 600 x 600 m plots in the Atlantic Forest biodiversity hotspot. We found that birds fly larger distances and visit more forest patches and remnant trees with decreasing forest cover. Increasing landscape isolation results in larger flight distances, and it increases the use of trees as stepping-stones for most species. Our results show that birds can adjust their behavior as a response to spatial modification in resource distribution and landscape connectivity. These adjusted behaviors can potentially contribute to ecosystem responses to habitat modification.
  • Borges, Paulo A. V.; Cardoso, Pedro; Kreft, Holger; Whittaker, Robert J.; Fattorini, Simone; Emerson, Brent C.; Gil, Artur; Gillespie, Rosemary G.; Matthews, Thomas J.; Santos, Ana M. C.; Steinbauer, Manuel J.; Thebaud, Christophe; Ah-Peng, Claudine; Amorim, Isabel R.; Aranda, Silvia Calvo; Arroz, Ana Moura; Azevedo, Jose Manuel N.; Boieiro, Mario; Borda-de-Agua, Luis; Carvalho, Jose Carlos; Elias, Rui B.; Fernandez-Palacios, Jose Maria; Florencio, Margarita; Gonzalez-Mancebo, Juana M.; Heaney, Lawrence R.; Hortal, Joaquin; Kueffer, Christoph; Lequette, Benoit; Martin-Esquivel, Jose Luis; Lopez, Heriberto; Lamelas-Lopez, Lucas; Marcelino, Jose; Nunes, Rui; Oromi, Pedro; Patino, Jairo; Perez, Antonio J.; Rego, Carla; Ribeiro, Servio P.; Rigal, Francois; Rodrigues, Pedro; Rominger, Andrew J.; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Schaefer, Hanno; Sergio, Cecilia; Serrano, Artur R. M.; Sim-Sim, Manuela; Stephenson, P. J.; Soares, Antonio O.; Strasberg, Dominique; Vanderporten, Alain; Vieira, Virgilio; Gabriel, Rosalina (2018)
    Islands harbour evolutionary and ecologically unique biota, which are currently disproportionately threatened by a multitude of anthropogenic factors, including habitat loss, invasive species and climate change. Native forests on oceanic islands are important refugia for endemic species, many of which are rare and highly threatened. Long-term monitoring schemes for those biota and ecosystems are urgently needed: (i) to provide quantitative baselines for detecting changes within island ecosystems, (ii) to evaluate the effectiveness of conservation and management actions, and (iii) to identify general ecological patterns and processes using multiple island systems as repeated 'natural experiments'. In this contribution, we call for a Global Island Monitoring Scheme (GIMS) for monitoring the remaining native island forests, using bryophytes, vascular plants, selected groups of arthropods and vertebrates as model taxa. As a basis for the GIMS, we also present new, optimized monitoring protocols for bryophytes and arthropods that were developed based on former standardized inventory protocols. Effective inventorying and monitoring of native island forests will require: (i) permanent plots covering diverse ecological gradients (e.g. elevation, age of terrain, anthropogenic disturbance); (ii) a multiple-taxa approach that is based on standardized and replicable protocols; (iii) a common set of indicator taxa and community properties that are indicative of native island forests' welfare, building on, and harmonized with existing sampling and monitoring efforts; (iv) capacity building and training of local researchers, collaboration and continuous dialogue with local stakeholders; and (v) long-term commitment by funding agencies to maintain a global network of native island forest monitoring plots.
  • Ge, Jielin; Berg, Bjorn; Xie, Zongqiang (2017)
    Leaf habit of tree species (evergreen versus deciduous) is proposed to be an important determinant of leaf litter decomposition, but it remains largely understudied as to how climatic regulation of litter decomposition differs between leaf habits. We isolated the relative role of climate and leaf habit in leaf litter decomposition by investigating the latitudinal pattern of leaf litter decomposition for Chinese broad-leaved tree species. Litter decomposition rate decreased with latitude, which was largely driven by mean annual temperature (MAT). Evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved tree species shared similar decomposition rate where they coexisted. Leaf litter decomposition of evergreen broad-leaved tree species was more sensitive to MAT than that of the deciduous species, whereas leaf litter decomposition of the deciduous trees was more sensitive than that of the evergreen to mean annual precipitation. Climatic variables explained more variation in leaf litter decomposition than did leaf habit alone. Our findings support the conventional paradigm that climate is a dominant regulator of leaf litter decomposition over broad geographical scales, notwithstanding recent studies calling into question this paradigm. While leaf habit alone does not predict leaf litter decomposition very well where both evergreen and deciduous species coexisted, the direction and strength of shift in leaf litter decomposition diverged between leaf habits across the climatic gradient. These findings underscore the urgent need to consider the impacts of changes in leaf habits when predicting leaf litter decomposition in response to climate change.
  • Rocha, A. V.; Cabanne, G. S.; Aleixo, A.; Silveira, L. F.; Tubaro, P.; Caparroz, R. (2020)
    Based on phylogeographic and niche model analyses of the narrow-billed woodcreeperLepidocolaptes angustirostris, we evaluated the predictions of two diversification hypotheses related to the dry diagonal of South America: (I) isolation by distance (IBD) and (II) landscape heterogeneity. We also investigated the influence of the Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the diversification and population dynamic of this species, and discussed the implications of our findings for the taxonomy of this woodcreeper. We sampled 63 individuals including all subspecies described forL. angustirostris, and compared them using a mitochondrial (ND2) and a nuclear (FIB5) fragments. We performed a Mantel test and spatial autocorrelation analysis, reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes, investigated changes in population size and estimated divergence time among the genetic lineages. We refuted the hypothesis that bird species associated with open environments have shallow geographic differentiation and showed that strong genetic structure observed inL. angustirostriscan not be explained by IBD. Paleo-modeling showed strong association between climatic stable areas and the genetic lineages, suggesting that Pleistocene climatic oscillations have primarily driven the intraspecific diversification of this species. In addition, the association between genetic lineages and the dry diagonal biomes supports that landscape heterogeneity may be acting as a secondary barrier restricting gene flow among the lineages. The genetic lineages found inL. angustirostrisdo not correspond to the subspecies described, indicating that this species can be considered as a single species with strong genetic structure. In conclusion, our data corroborate other studies indicating that Pleistocene climatic oscillations may have had a strong influence in the intraspecific divergence of dry diagonal fauna and that biomes of the dry diagonal should be considered as independent units in further biogeographic studies.
  • Molinier, Matthieu; Lopez-Sanchez, Carlos A.; Toivanen, Timo; Korpela, Ilkka; Corral-Rivas, Jose J.; Tergujeff, Renne; Häme, Tuomas (2016)
    Due to the high cost of traditional forest plot measurements, the availability of up-to-date in situ forest inventory data has been a bottleneck for remote sensing image analysis in support of the important global forest biomass mapping. Capitalizing on the proliferation of smartphones, citizen science is a promising approach to increase spatial and temporal coverages of in situ forest observations in a cost-effective way. Digital cameras can be used as a relascope device to measure basal area, a forest density variable that is closely related to biomass. In this paper, we present the Relasphone mobile application with extensive accuracy assessment in two mixed forest sites from different biomes. Basal area measurements in Finland ( boreal zone) were in good agreement with reference forest inventory plot data on pine ( R-2 = 0.75, RMSE = 5.33 m(2)/ha), spruce ( R-2 = 0.75, RMSE = 6.73 m(2)/ha) and birch ( R-2 = 0.71, RMSE = 4.98 m(2)/ha), with total relative RMSE ( %) = 29.66%. In Durango, Mexico ( temperate zone), Relasphone stem volume measurements were best for pine ( R-2 = 0.88, RMSE = 32.46 m(3)/ha) and total stem volume ( R-2 = 0.87, RMSE = 35.21 m(3)/ha). Relasphone data were then successfully utilized as the only reference data in combination with optical satellite images to produce biomass maps. The Relasphone concept has been validated for future use by citizens in other locations.
  • Dudley, Nigel; Jonas, Holly; Nelson, Fred; Parish, Jeffrey; Pyhälä, Aili Adelita; Stolton, Sue; Watson, James (2018)
    Continued biodiversity loss has prompted calls for half of the planet to be set aside for nature - including E. O Wilson's "Half-Earth" approach and the Wild Foundation's "Nature Needs Half" initiative. These efforts have provided a necessary wake-up call and drawn welcome global attention for the urgent need for increased action on conserving biodiversity and nature in general. Yet they have also sparked debate within the conservation community, particularly due to the huge practical and political obstacles to establishing or expanding protected areas on this scale. The new designation of "other effective area-based conservation measures" (OECMs) provides the opportunity for formal recognition of and support for areas delivering conservation outcomes outside the protected area estate. We argue that OECMs are essential to the achievement of big and bold conservation targets such as Half-Earth. But integration of OECMs into the conservation estate requires fundamental changes in protected area planning and how the conservation community deals with human rights and social safeguards issues; it therefore challenges our understanding of what constitutes "conservation". It will only succeed if the key drivers of biodiversity and ecosystem service loss are addressed in the whole planet. A broad, multifaceted and innovative approach, coupled with ambitious targets, provides our best hope yet of addressing complex conservation challenges. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Langner, Andreas; Miettinen, Jukka; Kukkonen, Markus; Vancutsem, Christelle; Simonetti, Dario; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Verhegghen, Astrid; Gallego, Javier; Stibig, Hans-Juergen (2018)
    This study presents an approach to forest canopy disturbance monitoring in evergreen forests in continental Southeast Asia, based on temporal differences of a modified normalized burn ratio (NBR) vegetation index. We generate NBR values from each available Landsat 8 scene of a given period. A step of ' self-referencing' normalizes the NBR values, largely eliminating illumination/topography effects, thus maximizing inter-comparability. We then create yearly composites of these self-referenced NBR (rNBR) values, selecting per pixel the maximum rNBR value over each observation period, which reflects the most open canopy cover condition of that pixel. The ArNBR is generated as the difference between the composites of two reference periods. The methodology produces seamless and consistent maps, highlighting patterns of canopy disturbances (e. g., encroachment, selective logging), and keeping artifacts at minimum level. The monitoring approach was validated within four test sites with an overall accuracy of almost 78% using very high resolution satellite reference imagery. The methodology was implemented in a Google Earth Engine (GEE) script requiring no user interaction. A threshold is applied to the final output dataset in order to separate signal from noise. The approach, capable of detecting sub-pixel disturbance events as small as 0.005 ha, is transparent and reproducible, and can help to increase the credibility of monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV), as required in the context of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+).
  • Torppa, Kaisa Anneli; Wirta, Helena; Hanski, Ilkka (2020)
    Tropical forests, which harbor high levels of biodiversity, are being lost at an alarming speed. Madagascar, a biodiversity hotspot, has lost more than half of its original forest cover. Most of the remaining forests are small fragments of primary and secondary forest with differing degrees of human impact. These forests, as well as coffee and fruit plantations, may be important in supporting the forest-dependent biodiversity in Madagascar but this has been little studied. In Madagascar, dung beetles, which offer important ecosystem services, are largely restricted to forests. We examined the ability of fragmented and degraded forests to support dung beetle diversity, compared to the large areas of primary forest in eastern Madagascar. We found a general trend of a reduction of species with a loss of forest connectivity. In contrast, a higher level of forest disturbance was associated with higher species diversity. In several sites of low-quality forest as many or more species were found as in less disturbed and primary forests. The average size of dung beetles was smaller in the lower quality localities than in the primary forests. These findings suggest that many forest dung beetles in Madagascar are better adapted to forest disturbance than earlier expected, although they require some level of connectivity to surrounding forest. in Malagasy is available with online material.