Browsing by Subject "TUMOR ANGIOGENESIS"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Hyytiäinen, Aini; Wahbi, Wafa; Väyrynen, Otto; Saarilahti, Kauko; Karihtala, Peeter; Salo, Tuula; Al-Samadi, Ahmed (2021)
    Background Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) carries poor survival outcomes despite recent progress in cancer treatment in general. Angiogenesis is crucial for tumour survival and progression. Therefore, several agents targeting the pathways that mediate angiogenesis have been developed. We conducted a systematic review to summarise the current clinical trial data examining angiogenesis inhibitors in HNSCC. Methods We carried out a literature search on three angiogenesis inhibitor categories-bevacizumab, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and endostatin-from Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Scopus and ClinicalTrials.gov database. Results Here, we analysed 38 clinical trials, total of 1670 patients, investigating 12 angiogenesis inhibitors. All trials were in phase I or II, except one study in phase III on bevacizumab. Angiogenesis inhibitors were used as mono- and combination therapies together with radio-, chemo-, targeted- or immunotherapy. Among 12 angiogenesis inhibitors, bevacizumab was the most studied drug, included in 13 trials. Although bevacizumab appeared effective in various combinations, it associated with high toxicity levels. Endostatin and lenvatinib were well-tolerated and their anticancer effects appeared promising. Conclusions Most studies did not show benefit of angiogenesis inhibitors in HNSCC treatment. Additionally, angiogenesis inhibitors were associated with considerable toxicity. However, some results appear encouraging, suggesting that further investigations of angiogenesis inhibitors, particularly in combination therapies, for HNSCC patients are warranted. Systematic Review Registration PROSPERO (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/), identifier CRD42020157144.
  • Penttila, Patrick; Rautiola, Juhana; Poussa, Tuija; Peltola, Katriina; Bono, Petri (2017)
    Previous preclinical research suggests that angiotensin system inhibitors may have a direct anti-angiogenic effect that may be synergistic with the currently available angiogenesis inhibitors. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 303 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with first-line angiogenesis inhibitors. Our results demonstrate a longer overall and progression-free survival for angiotensin system inhibitor users among patients with treatment-related hypertension. If validated, these results may guide the choice of antihypertensive medication among patients being treated with angiogenesis inhibitors. Background: Research suggests that baseline use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs) improves outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), but it remains unknown whether the type of antihypertensive medication used to initiate management at onset of treatment-induced hypertension (HTN) is associated with outcome. We evaluated the association of ASIs and outcome among patients with mRCC treated with first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients and Methods: We identified 303 consecutive patients with mRCC who were treated with sunitinib or pazopanib in a single university hospital cancer center. Statistical analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression adjusted for known risk factors. Results: Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were similar among patients with baseline HTN (n = 197; 65%) versus patients with no baseline HTN (n = 106; 35%) (PFS; P = .72) (OS; P = .54). There was a significant difference between patients with treatment-induced HTN (n = 110) versus patients with no treatment-induced HTN (n = 193) for PFS (15.6 vs. 6.4 months, respectively; P <.001) and OS (34.9 vs. 13.9 months, respectively; P <.001). Use of ASIs at baseline (n = 126; 41.6%) had no impact on outcome as compared with patients receiving other antihypertensive medication (n = 71; 23.4%) or with patients with no baseline antihypertensive medication (n = 106; 35.0%). Among patients with TKI-induced HTN (n = 110), however, ASI users (n = 91) demonstrated improved OS (37.5 vs. 18.1 months; P = .001) and PFS (17.1 vs. 7.2 months; P = .004) versus ASI nonusers (n = 19), respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate survival benefit for ASI users among patients with TKI-induced HTN. These results, however, require further validation in a prospective setting. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Karaman, Sinem; Leppänen, Veli-Matti; Alitalo, Kari (2018)
    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are best known for their involvement in orchestrating the development and maintenance of the blood and lymphatic vascular systems. VEGFs are secreted by a variety of cells and they bind to their cognate tyrosine kinase VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) in endothelial cells to elicit various downstream effects. In recent years, there has been tremendous progress in elucidating different VEGF/VEGFR signaling functions in both the blood and lymphatic vascular systems. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we present key elements of the VEGF/VEGFR pathway and highlight the classical and newly discovered functions of VEGF signaling in blood and lymphatic vessel development and pathology.