Browsing by Subject "TUMOR-GROWTH"

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  • Escala-Garcia, M.; Abraham, J.; Andrulis, I.L.; Anton-Culver, H.; Arndt, V.; Ashworth, A.; Auer, P.L.; Auvinen, P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Beesley, J.; Behrens, S.; Benitez, J.; Bermisheva, M.; Blomqvist, C.; Blot, W.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Bojesen, S.E.; Bolla, M.K.; Børresen-Dale, A.-L.; Brauch, H.; Brenner, H.; Brucker, S.Y.; Burwinkel, B.; Caldas, C.; Canzian, F.; Chang-Claude, J.; Chanock, S.J.; Chin, S.-F.; Clarke, C.L.; Couch, F.J.; Cox, A.; Cross, S.S.; Czene, K.; Daly, M.B.; Dennis, J.; Devilee, P.; Dunn, J.A.; Dunning, A.M.; Dwek, M.; Earl, H.M.; Eccles, D.M.; Eliassen, A.H.; Ellberg, C.; Evans, D.G.; Fasching, P.A.; Figueroa, J.; Flyger, H.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Gapstur, S.M.; García-Closas, M.; García-Sáenz, J.A.; Gaudet, M.M.; George, A.; Giles, G.G.; Goldgar, D.E.; González-Neira, A.; Grip, M.; Guénel, P.; Guo, Q.; Haiman, C.A.; Håkansson, N.; Hamann, U.; Harrington, P.A.; Hiller, L.; Hooning, M.J.; Hopper, J.L.; Howell, A.; Huang, C.-S.; Huang, G.; Hunter, D.J.; Jakubowska, A.; John, E.M.; Kaaks, R.; Kapoor, P.M.; Keeman, R.; Kitahara, C.M.; Koppert, L.B.; Kraft, P.; Kristensen, V.N.; Lambrechts, D.; Le Marchand, L.; Lejbkowicz, F.; Lindblom, A.; Lubiński, J.; Mannermaa, A.; Manoochehri, M.; Manoukian, S.; Margolin, S.; Martinez, M.E.; Maurer, T.; Mavroudis, D.; Meindl, A.; Milne, R.L.; Mulligan, A.M.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Nevanlinna, H.; Newman, W.G.; Olshan, A.F.; Olson, J.E.; Olsson, H.; Orr, N.; Peterlongo, P.; Petridis, C.; Prentice, R.L.; Presneau, N.; Punie, K.; Ramachandran, D.; Rennert, G.; Romero, A.; Sachchithananthan, M.; Saloustros, E.; Sawyer, E.J.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Schwentner, L.; Scott, C.; Simard, J.; Sohn, C.; Southey, M.C.; Swerdlow, A.J.; Tamimi, R.M.; Tapper, W.J.; Teixeira, M.R.; Terry, M.B.; Thorne, H.; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.; Tomlinson, I.; Troester, M.A.; Truong, T.; Turnbull, C.; Vachon, C.M.; van der Kolk, L.E.; Wang, Q.; Winqvist, R.; Wolk, A.; Yang, X.R.; Ziogas, A.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Hall, P.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Bader, G.D.; Dörk, T.; Easton, D.F.; Canisius, S.; Schmidt, M.K. (2020)
    Identifying the underlying genetic drivers of the heritability of breast cancer prognosis remains elusive. We adapt a network-based approach to handle underpowered complex datasets to provide new insights into the potential function of germline variants in breast cancer prognosis. This network-based analysis studies similar to 7.3 million variants in 84,457 breast cancer patients in relation to breast cancer survival and confirms the results on 12,381 independent patients. Aggregating the prognostic effects of genetic variants across multiple genes, we identify four gene modules associated with survival in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and one in ER-positive disease. The modules show biological enrichment for cancer-related processes such as G-alpha signaling, circadian clock, angiogenesis, and Rho-GTPases in apoptosis.
  • Knuuttila, Matias; Mehmood, Arfa; Huhtaniemi, Riikka; Yatkin, Emrah; Häkkinen, Merja R.; Oksala, Riikka; Laajala, Teemu D.; Ryberg, Henrik; Handelsman, David J.; Aittokallio, Tero; Auriola, Seppo; Ohlsson, Claes; Laiho, Asta; Elo, Laura L.; Sipila, Petra; Makela, Sari I.; Poutanen, Matti (2018)
    The development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is associated with the activation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and an increase in androgen receptor (AR) expression. We recently demonstrated that, similarly to the clinical CRPC, orthotopically grown castration-resistant VCaP (CR-VCaP) xenografts express high levels of AR and retain intratumoral androgen concentrations similar to tumors grown in intact mice. Herein, we show that antiandrogen treatment (enzalutamide or ARN-509) significantly reduced (10-fold, P <0.01) intratumoral testosterone and dihydrotestosterone concentrations in the CR-VCaP tumors, indicating that the reduction in intratumoral androgens is a novel mechanism by which antiandrogens mediate their effects in CRPC. Antiandrogen treatment also altered the expression of multiple enzymes potentially involved in steroid metabolism. Identical to clinical CRPC, the expression levels of the full-length AR (twofold, P <0.05) and the AR splice variants 1 (threefold, P <0.05) and 7 (threefold, P <0.01) were further increased in the antiandrogen-treated tumors. Nonsignificant effects were observed in the expression of certain classic androgen-regulated genes, such as TMPRSS2 and KLK3, despite the low levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. However, other genes recently identified to be highly sensitive to androgen-regulated AR action, such as NOV and ST6GalNAc1, were markedly altered, which indicated reduced androgen action. Taken together, the data indicate that, besides blocking AR, antiandrogens modify androgen signaling in CR-VCaP xenografts at multiple levels.
  • Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Moossavi, Shirin; Salem, Abdelhakim; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Tuovinen, Sarianna M.; Konttinen, Yrjo T.; Salo, Tuula; Bishehsari, Faraz (2016)
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in both genders. Even though interleukin (IL)-17A was shown to play an important role in intestinal tumourigenesis and CRC, other IL-17 family members were not studied well. We therefore studied the expression of IL-17 cytokine family members in CRC. Ten healthy colons and ten CRC mucosa were immunostained for IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17E, and IL-17F, and their receptors IL-17RA, IL-17RB, and IL-17RC. Double immunofluorescence staining of the CRC mucosa was done for IL-17B with markers of neutrophils, endothelial cells, macrophages, T cells, mast cells, or fibroblasts. While IL-17B was increased in CRC with a strong presence both in the epithelial and stromal compartments, IL-17C showed different expression depending on the grade of differentiation and IL-17E remained unchanged. In contrast, IL-17F was decreased in CRC compared to healthy control. Colon epithelial cells stained positive for IL-17RA, IL-17RB, and IL-17RC in both healthy control and CRC. Neutrophils were the main source of IL-17B in the stroma. IL-17 family members demonstrated distinct expression patterns in CRC, suggesting a differential role exerted by each member in colon carcinogenesis.
  • Spjuth, Ola; Karlsson, Andreas; Clements, Mark; Humphreys, Keith; Ivansson, Emma; Dowling, Jim; Eklund, Martin; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Czene, Kamila; Gronberg, Henrik; Sparen, Par; Wiklund, Fredrik; Cheddad, Abbas; Palsdottir, Porgerodur; Rantalainen, Mattias; Abrahamsson, Linda; Laure, Erwin; Litton, Jan-Eric; Palmgren, Juni (2017)
    Objective: We provide an e-Science perspective on the workflow from risk factor discovery and classification of disease to evaluation of personalized intervention programs. As case studies, we use personalized prostate and breast cancer screenings. Materials and Methods: We describe an e-Science initiative in Sweden, e-Science for Cancer Prevention and Control (eCPC), which supports biomarker discovery and offers decision support for personalized intervention strategies. The generic eCPC contribution is a workflow with 4 nodes applied iteratively, and the concept of e-Science signifies systematic use of tools from the mathematical, statistical, data, and computer sciences. Results: The eCPC workflow is illustrated through 2 case studies. For prostate cancer, an in-house personalized screening tool, the Stockholm-3 model (S3M), is presented as an alternative to prostate-specific antigen testing alone. S3M is evaluated in a trial setting and plans for rollout in the population are discussed. For breast cancer, new biomarkers based on breast density and molecular profiles are developed and the US multicenter Women Informed to Screen Depending on Measures (WISDOM) trial is referred to for evaluation. While current eCPC data management uses a traditional data warehouse model, we discuss eCPC-developed features of a coherent data integration platform. Discussion and Conclusion: E-Science tools are a key part of an evidence-based process for personalized medicine. This paper provides a structured workflow from data and models to evaluation of new personalized intervention strategies. The importance of multidisciplinary collaboration is emphasized. Importantly, the generic concepts of the suggested eCPC workflow are transferrable to other disease domains, although each disease will require tailored solutions.
  • Hakanpaa, Laura; Sipila, Tuomas; Leppanen, Veli-Matti; Gautam, Prson; Nurmi, Harri; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Eklund, Lauri; Ivaska, Johanna; Alitalo, Kari; Saharinen, Pipsa (2015)
  • Johns, Scott C.; Yin, Xin; Jeltsch, Michael; Bishop, Joseph R.; Schuksz, Manuela; El Ghazal, Roland; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Alitalo, Kari; Fuster, Mark M. (2016)
    Rationale: Lymphatic vessel growth is mediated by major prolymphangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D, among other endothelial effectors. Heparan sulfate is a linear polysaccharide expressed on proteoglycan core proteins on cell membranes and matrix, playing roles in angiogenesis, although little is known about any function(s) in lymphatic remodeling in vivo. Objective: To explore the genetic basis and mechanisms, whereby heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate pathological lymphatic remodeling. Methods and Results: Lymphatic endothelial deficiency in the major heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1; involved in glycan-chain sulfation) was associated with reduced lymphangiogenesis in pathological models, including spontaneous neoplasia. Mouse mutants demonstrated tumor-associated lymphatic vessels with apoptotic nuclei. Mutant lymphatic endothelia demonstrated impaired mitogen (Erk) and survival (Akt) pathway signaling and reduced VEGF-C-mediated protection from starvation-induced apoptosis. Lymphatic endothelial-specific Ndst1 deficiency (in Ndst1(f/f)Prox1(+/CreERT2) mice) was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-C-dependent lymphangiogenesis. Lymphatic heparan sulfate deficiency reduced phosphorylation of the major lymphatic growth receptor VEGF receptor-3 in response to multiple VEGF-C species. Syndecan-4 was the dominantly expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse lymphatic endothelia, and pathological lymphangiogenesis was impaired in Sdc4((-/-)) mice. On the lymphatic cell surface, VEGF-C induced robust association between syndecan-4 and VEGF receptor-3, which was sensitive to glycan disruption. Moreover, VEGF receptor-3 mitogen and survival signaling was reduced in the setting of Ndst1 or Sdc4 deficiency. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the genetic importance of heparan sulfate and the major lymphatic proteoglycan syndecan-4 in pathological lymphatic remodeling. This may introduce novel future strategies to alter pathological lymphatic-vascular remodeling.
  • Torrente, Laura; Maan, Gunjit; Rezig, Asma Oumkaltoum; Quinn, Jean; Jackson, Angus; Grilli, Andrea; Casares, Laura; Zhang, Ying; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Saarela, Jani; Bicciato, Silvio; Edwards, Joanne; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; de la Vega, Laureano (2020)
    Aberrant hyperactivation of nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2) p45-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a common event in many tumour types and associates with resistance to therapy and poor patient prognosis; however, its relevance in colorectal tumours is not well-established. Measuring the expression of surrogate genes for NRF2 activity in silico, in combination with validation in patients' samples, we show that the NRF2 pathway is upregulated in colorectal tumours and that high levels of nuclear NRF2 correlate with a poor patient prognosis. These results highlight the need to overcome the protection provided by NRF2 and present an opportunity to selectively kill cancer cells with hyperactive NRF2. Exploiting the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated colorectal cancer cell lines with hyperactive NRF2 and used them to perform a drug screen. We identified AT9283, an Aurora kinase inhibitor, for its selectivity towards killing cancer cells with hyperactive NRF2 as a consequence to either genetic or pharmacological activation. Our results show that hyperactivation of NRF2 in colorectal cancer cells might present a vulnerability that could potentially be therapeutically exploited by using the Aurora kinase inhibitor AT9283.
  • Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibanez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Siljander, Pia; Yliperttula, Marjo (2015)
    Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are naturally occurring membrane particles that mediate intercellular communication by delivering molecular information between cells. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of two different populations of EVs (microvesicle- and exosome-enriched) as carriers of Paclitaxel to autologous prostate cancer cells. Methods: EVs were isolated from LNCaP- and PC-3 prostate cancer cell cultures using differential centrifugation and characterized by electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and Western blot. The uptake of microvesicles and exosomes by the autologous prostate cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The EVs were loaded with Paclitaxel and the effectiveness of EV-mediated drug delivery was assessed with viability assays. The distribution of EVs and EV-delivered Paclitaxel in cells was inspected by confocal microscopy. Results: Our main finding was that the loading of Paclitaxel to autologous prostate cancer cell-derived EVs increased its cytotoxic effect. This capacity was independent of the EV population and the cell line tested. Although the EVs without the drug increased cancer cell viability, the net effect of enhanced cytotoxicity remained. Both EV populations delivered Paclitaxel to the recipient cells through endocytosis, leading to the release of the drug from within the cells. The removal of EV surface proteins did not affect exosomes, while the drug delivery mediated by microvesicles was partially inhibited. Conclusions: Cancer cell-derived EVs can be used as effective carriers of Paclitaxel to their parental cells, bringing the drug into the cells through an endocytic pathway and increasing its cytotoxicity. However, due to the increased cell viability, the use of cancer cell-derived EVs must be further investigated before any clinical applications can be designed. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Long, Maeve; McWilliams, Thomas G. (2020)
    Autophagy refers to an essential mechanism that evolved to sustain eukaryotic homeostasis and metabolism during instances of nutrient deprivation. During autophagy, intracellular cargo is encapsulated and delivered to the lysosome for elimination. Loss of basal autophagy in vivo negatively impacts cellular proteostasis, metabolism and tissue integrity. Accordingly, many drug development strategies are focused on modulating autophagic capacity in various pathophysiological states, from cancer to neurodegenerative disease. The role of autophagy in cancer is particularly complicated, as either augmenting or attenuating this process can have variable outcomes on cellular survival, proliferation and transformation. This complexity is compounded by the emergence of several selective autophagy pathways, which act to eliminate damaged or superfluous cellular components in a targeted fashion. The advent of sensitive tools to monitor autophagy pathways in vivo holds promise to clarify their importance in cancer pathophysiology. In this review, we provide an overview of autophagy in cancer biology and outline how the development of tools to study autophagy in vivo could enhance our understanding of its function for translational benefit.
  • Eloranta, Katja; Nousiainen, Ruth; Cairo, Stefano; Pakarinen, Mikko P.; Wilson, David B.; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Heikinheimo, Markku (2021)
    The neuropilins NRP1 and NRP2 are multifunctional glycoproteins that have been implicated in several cancer-related processes including cell survival, migration, and invasion in various tumor types. Here, we examine the role of neuropilins in hepatoblastoma (HB), the most common pediatric liver malignancy. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry, RNA analysis and western blotting, we observed high level expression of NRP1 and NRP2 in 19 of 20 HB specimens and in a majority of human HB cell lines (HUH6 and five cell lines established from patient-derived xenografts) studied but not in normal hepatocytes. Silencing of NRP2 expression in HUH6 and HB-282 HB cells resulted in decreased cell viability, impaired cytoskeleton remodeling, and reduced cell motility, suggesting that NRP2 contributes to the malignant phenotype. We propose that neuropilins warrant further investigation as biomarkers of HB and potential therapeutic targets.
  • Ylösmäki, Erkko; Fusciello, Manlio; Martins, Beatriz; Feola, Sara; Hamdan, Firas; Chiaro, Jacopo; Ylösmäki, Leena; Vaughan, Matthew J.; Viitala, Tapani; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2021)
    Background Intratumoral BCG therapy, one of the earliest immunotherapies, can lead to infiltration of immune cells into a treated tumor. However, an increase in the number of BCG-induced tumor-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment could lead to enhanced therapeutic effects. Methods Here, we have developed a novel cancer vaccine platform based on BCG that can broaden BCG-induced immune responses to include tumor antigens. By physically attaching tumor-specific peptides onto the mycobacterial outer membrane, we were able to induce strong systemic and intratumoral T cell-specific immune responses toward the attached tumor antigens. These therapeutic peptides can be efficiently attached to the mycobacterial outer membrane using a poly-lysine sequence N-terminally fused to the tumor-specific peptides. Results Using two mouse models of melanoma and a mouse model of colorectal cancer, we observed that the antitumor immune responses of BCG could be improved by coating the BCG with tumor-specific peptides. In addition, by combining this novel cancer vaccine platform with anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy, the number of responders to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy was markedly increased. Conclusions This study shows that intratumoral BCG immunotherapy can be improved by coating the bacteria with modified tumor-specific peptides. In addition, this improved BCG immunotherapy can be combined with ICI therapy to obtain enhanced tumor growth control. These results warrant clinical testing of this novel cancer vaccine platform.
  • Guryanov, Ivan; Tennikova, Tatiana; Urtti, Arto (2021)
    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are the family of extracellular signaling proteins involved in the processes of angiogenesis. VEGFA overexpression and altered regulation of VEGFA signaling pathways lead to pathological angiogenesis, which contributes to the progression of various diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and decoy receptors have been extensively used in the anti-angiogenic therapies for the neutralization of VEGFA. However, multiple side effects, solubility and aggregation issues, and the involvement of compensatory VEGFA-independent pro-angiogenic mechanisms limit the use of the existing VEGFA inhibitors. Short chemically synthesized VEGFA binding peptides are a promising alternative to these full-length proteins. In this review, we summarize anti-VEGFA peptides identified so far and discuss the molecular basis of their inhibitory activity to highlight their pharmacological potential as anti-angiogenic drugs.
  • Santio, Niina M.; Eerola, Sini K.; Paatero, Ilkka; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Anizon, Fabrice; Moreau, Pascale; Tuomela, Johanna; Härkönen, Pirkko; Koskinen, Päivi J. (2015)
    Background and methods Pim family proteins are oncogenic kinases implicated in several types of cancer and involved in regulation of cell proliferation, survival as well as motility. Here we have investigated the ability of Pim kinases to promote metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells in two xenograft models for human prostate cancer. We have also evaluated the efficacy of Pim-selective inhibitors to antagonize these effects. Results We show here that tumorigenic growth of both subcutaneously and orthotopically inoculated prostate cancer xenografts is enhanced by stable overexpression of either Pim-1 or Pim-3. Moreover, Pim-overexpressing orthotopic prostate tumors are highly invasive and able to migrate not only to the nearby prostate-draining lymph nodes, but also into the lungs to form metastases. When the xenografted mice are daily treated with the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, both the volumes as well as the metastatic capacity of the tumors are drastically decreased. Interestingly, the Pim-promoted metastatic growth of the orthotopic xenografts is associated with enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, forced Pim expression also increases phosphorylation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which may enable the tumor cells to migrate towards tissues such as the lungs that express the CXCL12 chemokine ligand. Conclusions Our results indicate that Pim overexpression enhances the invasive properties of prostate cancer cells in vivo. These effects can be reduced by the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, which can reach tumor tissues without serious side effects. Thus, Pim-targeting therapies with DHPCC-9-like compounds may help to prevent progression of local prostate carcinomas to fatally metastatic malignancies.
  • Keuschnigg, Johannes; Karinen, Sirkku; Auvinen, Kaisa; Irjala, Heikki; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko (2013)
  • Acheva, Anna; Haghdoost, Siamak; Sollazzo, Alice; Launonen, Virpi; Kämäräinen, Meerit (2019)
    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of a microenvironment in the induction of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as a sign of early stages of carcinogenesis in human lung epithelial cell lines after protracted low-dose rate gamma-radiation exposures. BEAS-2B and HBEC-3KT lung cell lines were irradiated with low-dose rate gamma-rays (Cs-137, 1.4 or 14 mGy/h) to 0.1 or 1 Gy with or without adding TGF-beta. TGF-beta-treated samples were applied as positive EMT controls and tested in parallel to find out if the radiation has a potentiating effect on the EMT induction. To evaluate the effect of the stromal component, the epithelial cells were irradiated in cocultures with stromal MRC-9 lung fibroblasts. On day 3 post treatment, the EMT markers: alpha-SMA, vimentin, fibronectin, and E-cadherin, were analyzed. The oxidative stress levels were evaluated by 8-oxo-dG analysis in both epithelial and fibroblast cells. The protracted exposure to low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation at the total absorbed dose of 1 Gy was able to induce changes suggestive of EMT. The results show that the presence of the stromal component and its signaling (TGF-beta) in the cocultures enhances the EMT. Radiation had a minor cumulative effect on the TGF-beta-induced EMT with both doses. The oxidative stress levels were higher than the background in both epithelial and stromal cells post chronic irradiation (0.1 and 1 Gy); as for the BEAS-2B cell line, the increase was statistically significant. We suggest that the induction of EMT in bronchial epithelial cells by radiation requires more than single acute exposure and the presence of stromal component might enhance the effect through free radical production and accumulation.
  • Magistri, Paolo; Battistelli, Cecilia; Strippoli, Raffaee; Petrucciani, Niccolo; Pellinen, Teijo; Rossi, Lucia; Mangogna, Livia; Aurello, Paolo; D'Angelo, Francesco; Tripodi, Marco; Ramacciato, Giovanni; Nigri, Giuseppe (2018)
    Colon Cancer (CC) is the fourth most frequently diagnosed tumor and the second leading cause of death in the USA. Abnormalities of Hedgehog pathway have been demonstrated in several types of human cancers, however the role of Hedgehog (Hh) in CC remain controversial. In this study, we analyzed the association between increased mRNA expression of GLI1 and GLI2, two Hh target genes, and CC survival and recurrence by gene expression microarray from a cohort of 382 CC patients. We found that patients with increased expression of GLI1 showed a statistically significant reduction in survival. In order to demonstrate a causal role of Hh pathway activation in the pathogenesis of CC, we treated HCT 116, SW480 and SW620 CC cells lines with GDC-0449, a pharmacological inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO). Treatment with GDC-0449 markedly reduced expression of Hh target genes GLI1, PTCH1, HIP1, MUC5AC, thus indicating that this pathway is constitutively active in CC cell lines. Moreover, GDC-0449 partially reduced cell proliferation, which was associated with upregulation of p21 and downregulation of CycD1. Finally, treatment with the same drug reduced migration and three-dimensional invasion, which were associated with downregulation of Snail1, the EMT master gene, and with induction of the epithelial markers Cytokeratin-18 and E-cadherin. These results were confirmed by SMO genetic silencing. Notably, treatment with 5E1, a Sonic Hedgehog-specific mAb, markedly reduced the expression of Hedgehog target genes, as well as inhibited cell proliferation and mediated reversion toward an epithelial phenotype. This suggests the existence of a Hedgehog autocrine signaling loop affecting cell plasticity and fostering cell proliferation andmigration/invasion in CC cell lines. These discoveries encourage future investigations to better characterize the role of Hedgehog in cellular plasticity and invasion during the different steps of CC pathogenesis.
  • Kumar, Arun; Chen, Tingting; Kantele, Anu; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli; Pakkanen, Sari Hannele (2011)
    The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT) viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50–80% of adults display MCPyVspecific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs), using human bocavirus (HBoV) VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-c, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyVseropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-c. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-c responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-c responses. IFN-c being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance.
  • Li, Yunzhan; Liu, Zehua; Li, Li; Lian, Wenhua; He, Yaohui; Khalil, Elbadry; Makila, Ermei; Zhang, Wenzhong; Torrieri, Giulia; Liu, Xueyan; Su, Jingyi; Xiu, Yuanming; Fontana, Flavia; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A.; Deng, Xianming (2020)
    The analysis of nanoparticles' biocompatibility and immunogenicity is mostly performed under a healthy condition. However, more clinically relevant evaluation conducted under pathological condition is less known. Here, the immunogenicity and bio-nano interactions of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) are evaluated in an acute liver inflammation mice model. Interestingly, a new mechanism in which PSi NPs can remit the hepatocellular damage and inflammation activation in a surface dependent manner through protein corona formation, which perturbs the inflammation by capturing the pro-inflammatory signaling proteins that are inordinately excreted or exposed under pathological condition, is found. This signal sequestration further attenuates the nuclear factor kappa B pathway activation and cytokines production from macrophages. Hence, the study proposes a potential mechanism for elucidating the altered immunogenicity of nanomaterials under pathological conditions, which might further offer insights to establish harmonized standards for assessing the biosafety of biomaterials in a disease-specific or personalized manner.
  • Soini, Ylermi; Tuhkanen, Hanna; Sironen, Reijo; Virtanen, Ismo; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Paivi; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti (2011)
  • Karki, Tytti; Tojkander, Sari (2021)
    Biophysical cues from the cellular microenvironment are detected by mechanosensitive machineries that translate physical signals into biochemical signaling cascades. At the crossroads of extracellular space and cell interior are located several ion channel families, including TRP family proteins, that are triggered by mechanical stimuli and drive intracellular signaling pathways through spatio-temporally controlled Ca2+-influx. Mechanosensitive Ca2+-channels, therefore, act as critical components in the rapid transmission of physical signals into biologically compatible information to impact crucial processes during development, morphogenesis and regeneration. Given the mechanosensitive nature of many of the TRP family channels, they must also respond to the biophysical changes along the development of several pathophysiological conditions and have also been linked to cancer progression. In this review, we will focus on the TRPV, vanilloid family of TRP proteins, and their connection to cancer progression through their mechanosensitive nature.