Browsing by Subject "Tree species"

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  • Korpela, Ilkka (2017)
    Forest inventories comprise observations, models and sampling. Airborne LiDAR has established its role in providing observations of canopy geometry and topography. These data are input for estimation of important forest properties to support forestry-related decision-making. A major deficiency in forest remote sensing is tree species identification. This study examines the option of using multi-footprint airborne LiDAR data. Features of such sensor design exist in recently introduced multispectral laser scanners. The first objective was to acquire radiometrically normalized, multi-footprint (11, 22, 44 and 59 cm) waveform (WF) data that characterize 1064nm backscatter reflectance on the interval scale. The second objective was to analyze and validate the data quality in order to draw the correct conclusions about the effect of footprint size on WFs from natural and man-made targets. The experiment was carried out in Finland. Footprint variation was generated by acquiring data at different flying heights and by adjusting the transmitted power. The LiDAR campaign was successful and the data were of sufficient quality, except for a 1 dB trend due to the atmosphere. Significant findings were made conceming the magnitude of atmospheric losses, the linearity of the amplitude scale and the bandwidth characteristics of the receiver, the stability of the transmitter, the precision of the amplitude data and the transmission losses in canopies and power lines, as well as the response of WF attributes to footprint size in forest canopies. Multi-footprint data are a promising approach although the tree species-specific signatures were weak. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Purhonen, Jenna; Ovaskainen, Otso; Halme, Panu; Komonen, Atte; Huhtinen, Seppo; Kotiranta, Heikki; Laessoe, Thomas; Abrego, Nerea (2020)
    Tree species is one of the most important determinants of wood-inhabiting fungal community composition, yet its relationship with fungal reproductive and dispersal traits remains poorly understood. We studied fungal communities (total of 657 species) inhabiting broadleaved and coniferous dead wood (total of 192 logs) in 12 semi-natural boreal forests. We utilized a trait-based hierarchical joint species distribution model to examine how the relationship between dead wood quality and species occurrence correlates with reproductive and dispersal morphological traits. Broadleaved trees had higher species richness than conifers, due to discomycetoids and pyrenomycetoids specializing in them. Resupinate and pileate species were generally specialized in coniferous dead wood. Fungi inhabiting broadleaved trees had larger and more elongated spores than fungi in conifers. Spore size was larger and spore shape more spherical in species occupying large dead wood units. These results indicate the selective effect of dead wood quality, visible not only in species diversity, but also in reproductive and dispersal traits. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.