Browsing by Subject "Trigger"

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  • Acharya, S.; Brucken, E. J.; Chang, B.; Kim, D. J.; Litichevskyi, V.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Orava, R.; Rak, J.; Räsänen, S. S.; Snellman, T. W.; Trzaska, W. H.; Viinikainen, J.; The ALICE collaboration (2018)
    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) was designed and built to enhance the capabilities of the ALICE detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While aimed at providing electron identification and triggering, the TRD also contributes significantly to the track reconstruction and calibration in the central barrel of ALICE. In this paper the design, construction, operation, and performance of this detector are discussed. A pion rejection factor of up to 410 is achieved at a momentum of 1 GeV/c in p-Pb collisions and the resolution at high transverse momentum improves by about 40% when including the TRD information in track reconstruction. The triggering capability is demonstrated both for jet, light nuclei, and electron selection. (c) 2017 CERN for the benefit of the Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Sallinen, Hanne; Putaala, Jukka; Strbian, Daniel (2020)
    Background: In ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are known preceding triggering events that predispose to the stroke by, for example, abruptly raising blood pressure. We explored, whether triggering events can be identified in non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: We used structured questionnaires to interview consented patients with ICH treated in a tertiary teaching hospital, between 2014 and 2016. We asked of possible trigger factors, including Valsalva-inducing activity, heavy physical exertion, sexual activity, abrupt change in position, a heavy meal, a sudden change in temperature, exposure to traffic jam, and the combination of the first three (any physical trigger) during the hazard period of 0-2 h prior to ICH. The ratio of the reported trigger during the hazard period was compared to the same 2-h period the previous day (control period) to calculate the relative risks for each factor (case-crossover design). Results: Of our 216 consented ICH patients, 97 (35.0%) could be interviewed for trigger questions. Reasons for not able to provide consistent and reliable responses included lowered level of consciousness, delirium, impaired memory, and aphasia. None of the studied possible triggers alone were more frequent during the hazard period compared to the control period. However, when all physical triggers were combined, we found an association with the triggering event and onset of ICH (risk ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.73). Conclusions: Obtaining reliable information on the preceding events before ICH onset was challenging. However, we found that physical triggers as a group were associated with the onset of ICH.