Browsing by Subject "UNFRACTIONATED HEPARIN"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Pozharitskaya, Olga N.; Shikov, Alexander N.; Faustova, Natalya M.; Obluchinskaya, Ekaterina D.; Kosman, Vera M.; Vuorela, Heikki; Makarov, Valery G. (2018)
    Fucus vesiculosus L., known as bladderwrack, belongs to the brown seaweeds, which are widely distributed throughout northern Russia, Atlantic shores of Europe, the Baltic Sea, Greenland, the Azores, the Canary Islands, and shores of the Pacific Ocean. Fucoidan is a major fucose-rich sulfated polysaccharide found in Fucus (F.) vesiculosus. The pharmacokinetic profiling of active compounds is essential for drug development and approval. The aim of the study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of fucoidan in rats after a single-dose oral administration. Fucoidan was isolated from F. vesiculosus. The method of measuring anti-activated factor X (anti-Xa) activity by amidolytic assay was used to analyze the plasma and tissue concentrations of fucoidan. The tissue distribution of fucoidan after intragastric administration to the rats was characterized, and it exhibited considerable heterogeneity. Fucoidan preferentially accumulates in the kidneys (AUC(0-t) = 10.74 mu g.h/g; C-max = 1.23 mu g/g after 5 h), spleen (AUC(0-t) = 6.89 mu g.h/g; C-max = 0.78 mu g/g after 3 h), and liver (AUC(0-t) = 3.26 mu g.h/g; C-max = 0.53 mu g/g after 2 h) and shows a relatively long absorption time and extended circulation in the blood, with a mean residence time (MRT) = 6.79 h. The outcome of this study provides additional scientific data for traditional use of fucoidan-containing plants and offers tangible support for the continued development of new effective pharmaceuticals using fucoidan.
  • Vahtera, Annukka; Vaara, Suvi; Pettila, Ville; Kuitunen, Anne (2016)
    Background: Critical care patients are prone to venous thromboembolism (VTE) and, thus, pharmacological thromboprophylaxis is generally advised. Low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) have become the drug of choice in ICU patients, since their predictable and reproducible dose response. Monitoring their pharmacological effect is not usually necessary except in special occasions (i.e. with obese or renal failure patients), where anti-FXa level measuring is recommended. However, there is neither recommendation of adequate anti-FXa levels in critically ill patients nor is it known whether peak or trough level should be measured. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the recommended LMWH doses, and the reasons to monitor anti-FXa levels. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.com to identify all potentially relevant studies. Prospective studies done in critically ill patients were included if at least one anti-FXa level (i.e. peak or trough) after any specified LMWH thromboprophylaxis dose was measured. Results: Total 18 eligible studies including 1644 patients were included. There was a wide variation in the median peak anti-FXa levels ( Conclusion: Based on the current literature, no definite conclusions can be drawn on targeted anti-FXa level in critically ill patients when using LMWH thromboprophylaxis. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • ACCA Study Grp Prehosp Care; Beygui, Farzin; Castren, Maaret; Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Goldstein, Patrick (2020)
    Chest pain and acute dyspnoea are frequent causes of emergency medical services activation. The pre-hospital management of these conditions is heterogeneous across different regions of the world and Europe, as a consequence of the variety of emergency medical services and absence of specific practical guidelines. This position paper focuses on the practical aspects of the pre-hospital treatment on board and transfer of patients taken in charge by emergency medical services for chest pain and dyspnoea of suspected cardiac aetiology after the initial assessment and diagnostic work-up. The objective of the paper is to provide guidance, based on evidence, where available, or on experts' opinions, for all emergency medical services' health providers involved in the pre-hospital management of acute cardiovascular care.
  • Skrifvars, Markus; Bailey, Michael; Presneill, Jeffrey; French, Craig; Nichol, Alistair; Little, Lorraine; Duranteau, Jacques; Huet, Olivier; Haddad, Samir; Arabi, Yaseen; McArthur, Colin; Cooper, D. James; Bellomo, Rinaldo (2017)
    To estimate the prevalence, risk factors, prophylactic treatment and impact on mortality for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) treated in the intensive care unit. A post hoc analysis of the erythropoietin in traumatic brain injury (EPO-TBI) trial that included twice-weekly lower limb ultrasound screening. Venous thrombotic events were defined as ultrasound-proven proximal deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or clinically detected pulmonary embolism (PE). Results are reported as events, percentages or medians and interquartile range (IQR). Cox regression analysis was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for time to VTE and death. Of 603 patients, 119 (19.7%) developed VTE, mostly comprising DVT (102 patients, 16.9%) with a smaller number of PE events (24 patients, 4.0%). Median time to DVT diagnosis was 6 days (IQR 2-11) and to PE diagnosis 6.5 days (IQR 2-16.5). Mechanical prophylaxis (MP) was used in 91% of patients on day 1, 97% of patients on day 3 and 98% of patients on day 7. Pharmacological prophylaxis was given in 5% of patients on day 1, 30% of patients on day 3 and 57% of patients on day 7. Factors associated with time to VTE were age (HR per year 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03), patient weight (HR per kg 1.01, 95% CI 1-1.02) and TBI severity according to the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials risk of poor outcome (HR per 10% increase 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.25). The development of VTE was not associated with mortality (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.51-1.65). Despite mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis, VTE occurs in one out of every five patients with TBI treated in the ICU. Higher age, greater weight and greater severity of TBI increase the risk. The development of VTE was not associated with excess mortality.