Browsing by Subject "UNKNOWN PRIMARY"

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  • Frank, Christoph; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Akseli; Hemminki, Kari (2017)
    A family history of cutaneous melanoma ('melanoma') is a well-established risk factor for melanoma. However, less is known about the possible familial associations of melanoma with other discordant cancers. A risk for discordant cancer may provide useful information about shared genetic and environmental risk factors and it may be relevant background data in clinical genetic counseling. Using the Swedish Family-Cancer Database, we assessed the relative risk (RR) for any cancer in families with increasing numbers of first-degree relatives diagnosed with melanoma, including multiple melanoma, and in reverse order RR for melanoma in families of multiple discordant cancers. Close to 9% of melanoma was familial; among these 92% were in 2-case families and 8% in families with 3 cases or more. Cancers that were associated with melanoma, in at least two independent analyses, included breast, prostate, colorectal, skin and nervous system cancers. Other associations included cancer of unknown primary, acute myeloid leukemia/myelofibrosis and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia/myeloma. Significant results, which appear biologically plausible, were also obtained for rare nasal melanoma and mesothelioma. Although small samples sizes and multiple comparisons were of concern, many of the above associations were internally consistent and provide new diverse leads for discordant familial association of melanoma.
  • Mäkitie, Antti A.; Keski-Säntti, Harri; Markkanen-Leppänen, Mari; Bäck, Leif; Koivunen, Petri; Ekberg, Tomas; Sandström, Karl; Laurell, Göran; von Beckerath, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan S.; Wahlberg, Peter; Greiff, Lennart; Spaak, Lena Norberg; Kjaergaard, Thomas; Godballe, Christian; Rikardsen, Oddveig; Channir, Hani Ibrahim; Rubek, Niclas; von Buchwald, Christian (2018)
    Background: The five Nordic countries with a population of 27 M people form a rather homogenous region in terms of health care. The management of head and neck cancer is centralized to the 21 university hospitals in these countries. Our aim was to gain an overview of the volume and role of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and to evaluate the need to centralize it in this area as the field is rapidly developing. Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire was sent to all 10 Departments of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in the Nordic countries having an active programme for TORS in December 2017. Results: The total cumulative number of performed robotic surgeries at these 10 Nordic centers was 528 and varied between 5 and 240 per center. The median annual number of robotic surgeries was 38 (range, 5-60). The observed number of annually operated cases remained fairly low ( Conclusions: The present results showing a limited volume of performed surgeries call for considerations to further centralize TORS in the Nordic countries.