Browsing by Subject "US CHILDREN"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-3 of 3
  • Micai, M; Ciaramella, A; Salvitti, T; Fulceri, F; Fatta, LM; Poustka, L; Diehm, R; Iskrov, G; Stefanov, R; Guillon, Q; Roge, B; Staines, A; Sweeney, MR; Boilson, AM; Leosdottir, T; Saemundsen, E; Moilanen, I; Ebeling, H; Yliherva, A; Gissler, M; Parviainen, T; Tani, P; Kawa, R; Vicente, A; Rasga, C; Budisteanu, M; Dale, I; Povey, C; Flores, N; Jenaro, C; Monroy, ML; Primo, PG; Charman, T; Cramer, S; Warberg, CK; Canal-Bedia, R; Posada, M; Scattoni, ML; Schendel, D (2021)
  • ADHD Working Grp Psychiat Genomics; Early Lifecourse Genetic; 23andMe Res Team; Daly, Mark J. (2019)
    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable childhood behavioral disorder affecting 5% of children and 2.5% of adults. Common genetic variants contribute substantially to ADHD susceptibility, but no variants have been robustly associated with ADHD. We report a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 20,183 individuals diagnosed with ADHD and 35,191 controls that identifies variants surpassing genome-wide significance in 12 independent loci, finding important new information about the underlying biology of ADHD. Associations are enriched in evolutionarily constrained genomic regions and loss-of-function intolerant genes and around brain-expressed regulatory marks. Analyses of three replication studies: a cohort of individuals diagnosed with ADHD, a self-reported ADHD sample and a meta-analysis of quantitative measures of ADHD symptoms in the population, support these findings while highlighting study-specific differences on genetic overlap with educational attainment. Strong concordance with GWAS of quantitative population measures of ADHD symptoms supports that clinical diagnosis of ADHD is an extreme expression of continuous heritable traits.
  • Arrhenius, Bianca; Gyllenberg, David; Chudal, Roshan; Lehti, Venla; Sucksdorff, Minna; Sourander, Ona; Virtanen, Juha-Pekka; Torsti, Jutta; Sourander, Andre (2018)
    Background: Broadly defined learning and coordination disorders (LCDs) are common in the population and have previously been associated with familial social risk factors and male sex. However, comprehensive nationwide studies of these risk factors in LCD subgroups are lacking. Our objective was to assess different LCDs in relation to sex and maternal education, marital status and socioeconomic status based on occupation. Methods: We conducted a nationwide register-based study. The following diagnoses were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register (FHDR) according to the ICD-10 (n = 28,192): speech disorders (F80), scholastic disorders (F81), motor and coordination disorders (F82) and mixed developmental disorder (F83). To study cumulative incidence and male: female ratios of service use of LCDs, we used a cohort design among all Finnish children born singleton 1996-2007 (n = 690,654); to study social risk factors, we used a nested case-control design with extensive register data on both cases and matched controls (n = 106,616). Results: The cumulative incidence was 4.7% for any LCD by age 15 and the changes in cumulative incidence over time were minor. The male: female ratios were 2.2-3.0 across LCD subgroups. Learning and coordination disorders were more common in households with lower maternal education, socioeconomic status based on occupation and among children with single mothers at the time of birth; the odds ratios (OR) for any LCD were 1.2-1.9 across risk factors. The odds for LCD diagnosis increased linearly with the number of social risk factors, except for coordination disorder. The effect size of three risk factors was highest in the group with mixed or multiple LCDs; OR 3.76 (95% CI 3.31-4.28). Conclusions: Multiple social risk factors increase the odds for multiple, more comprehensive learning difficulties. The findings have implications for service planning, as early identification and interventions of learning and coordination disorders might reduce related long-term social adversities.