Browsing by Subject "USERS"

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  • Celikkayalar, Ercan; Airaksinen, Marja; Kivelä, Sirkka-Liisa; Nieminen, Jenni; Kleme, Jenni; Puustinen, Juha (2021)
    Purpose: The use of benzodiazepines and related drugs (BZD) is common among older adults although there is growing evidence of their harmful effects. This study investigated how well older people are aware of the potential risks related to the BZD they are taking and whether the risk awareness has changed in the years between 2004 and 2015. Patients and Methods: The data were collected by interviewing BZD using home-dwelling patients aged >= 65 years with normal cognitive function (MMSE >= 20) who were admitted to the hospital within a 1 month study period in the years 2004 and 2015. Patients were asked whether they were aware of the ten main potential risks related to BZD use. A risk awareness score (range 0-10) was assessed for each patient, each known potential risk yielding one point. Results: The study included 37 patients in 2004 and 31 patients in 2015. In 2004,6/37 patients (16%), while 16/31 patients (52%) in 2015 had risk awareness scores between 6 and 10. Awareness of dependence (p=0.047), interaction with alcohol (p=0.001), dizziness (p=0.002) and developing tolerance (p=0.002) had improved, while awareness of the other potential risks remained unchanged, muscle weakness being the least known (3/37 in 2004 and 4/31 in 2015 were aware of it as a potential risk). Regular BZD use had declined (p=0.043) but pro re nata (PRN; when required) BZD use had increased (p=0.003) between the years 2004 and 2015. Conclusion: Older BZD users' awareness of some potential risks related to BZD use (dependence, interaction with alcohol, dizziness and developing tolerance) had improved between 2004 and 2015, while awareness of other potential risks remained unchanged.
  • He, Chen; Micallef, Luana; He, Liye; Peddinti, Gopal; Aittokallio, Tero; Jacucci, Giulio (2021)
    Understanding the quality of insight has become increasingly important with the trend of allowing users to post comments during visual exploration, yet approaches for qualifying insight are rare. This article presents a case study to investigate the possibility of characterizing the quality of insight via the interactions performed. To do this, we devised the interaction of a visualization tool—MediSyn—for insight generation. MediSyn supports five types of interactions: selecting, connecting, elaborating, exploring, and sharing. We evaluated MediSyn with 14 participants by allowing them to freely explore the data and generate insights. We then extracted seven interaction patterns from their interaction logs and correlated the patterns to four aspects of insight quality. The results show the possibility of qualifying insights via interactions. Among other findings, exploration actions can lead to unexpected insights; the drill-down pattern tends to increase the domain values of insights. A qualitative analysis shows that using domain knowledge to guide exploration can positively affect the domain value of derived insights. We discuss the study’s implications, lessons learned, and future research opportunities.
  • Launonen, Essiina; Wallace, Isla; Kotovirta, Elina; Alho, Hannu; Simojoki, Kaarlo (2016)
    Background: The intravenous (IV) use of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) medications and other intoxicating drugs among OMT patients is a challenge for many OMT units and affects treatment outcomes. The aim of this study is to examine factors associated with IV use of OMT medications and other intoxicating drugs among Finnish OMT patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among all Finnish OMT patients of whom 60% (n = 1508) participated. The data were collected by anonymous questionnaire. Binominal regression analysis with unadjusted and adjusted ORs was conducted to evaluate predictors for IV use. Findings: Factors associated with the injection of a patient's own OMT medication were: being treated with buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX) (OR 2.60, p = 0.005) with a low dose ( Conclusions: More effort should be made to reduce concurrent injecting use during OMT. This may be done by addressing concurrent substance use orders more effectively, by ensuring that patients receive an optimal BNX dose and by providing more psychosocial support. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Mela, Hanna; Peltomaa, Juha; Salo, Marja; Mäkinen, Kirsi; Hildén, Mikael (2018)
    Smart metering is advancing rapidly and consumption feedback from smart meters is expected to help residents to reduce their energy and water consumption. In recent years, more critical views have been expressed based on theories of social practice, arguing that smart meter feedback ignores the role of various mundane practices where energy and water are consumed and instead targets individuals as active decision-makers. We present a review of qualitative studies on smart meter feedback and results of a survey to European smart metering projects. We argue that theories of social practice can be used to reframe the challenges and potentials of smart meter feedback that have been identified in the literature and our survey. This presents challenges of smart meter feedback as resulting from normalised resource intensive practices rather than from uninterested and comfort-loving individuals. Potentials of improving the effectiveness of smart meter feedback relate to supporting communities and peer-learning and combining smart meter feedback with micro-generation of renewable energy. This has implications for how domestic energy and water consumption is targeted by policy.
  • Wikström, Valtteri; Falcon, Mari; Martikainen, Silja; Pejoska, Jana; Dural, Eva; Bauters, Merja; Saarikivi, Katri Annukka (2021)
    Augmenting online interpersonal communication with biosignals, often in the form of heart rate sharing, has shown promise in increasing affiliation, feelings of closeness, and intimacy. Increasing empathetic awareness in the professional domain and in the customer interface could benefit both customer and employee satisfaction, but heart rate sharing in this context needs to consider issues around physiological monitoring of employees, appropriate level of intimacy, as well as the productivity outlook. In this study, we explore heart rate sharing at the workplace and study its effects on task performance. Altogether, 124 participants completed a collaborative visual guidance task using a chat box with heart rate visualization. Participants’ feedback about heart rate sharing reveal themes such as a stronger sense of human contact and increased self-reflection, but also raise concerns around unnecessity, intimacy, privacy and negative interpretations. Live heart rate was always measured, but to investigate the effect of heart rate sharing on task performance, half of the customers were told that they were seeing a recording, and half were told that they were seeing the advisor’s live heart beat. We found a negative link between awareness and task performance. We also found that higher ratings of usefulness of the heart rate visualization were associated with increased feelings of closeness. These results reveal that intimacy and privacy issues are particularly important for heart rate sharing in professional contexts, that preference modulates the effects of heart rate sharing on social closeness, and that heart rate sharing may have a negative effect on performance.
  • Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Khami, Mohammad R.; Mohebbi, Simin Z.; Virtanen, Jorma I. (2013)
  • Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Khami, Mohammad R.; Mohebbi, Simin Z.; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Virtanen, Jorma I. (2013)
  • Majuri, Joonas; Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Voon, Valerie; Parkkola, Riitta; Alho, Hannu; Arponen, Eveliina; Kaasinen, Valtteri (2017)
    Behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling (PG) and binge eating disorder (BED), appear to be associated with specific changes in brain dopamine and opioid function, but the role of other neurotransmitter systems is less clear. Given the crucial role of serotonin in a number of psychiatric disorders, we aimed to compare brain serotonergic function among individuals with BED, PG and healthy controls. Seven BED patients, 13 PG patients and 16 healthy controls were scanned with high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) using the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [C-11]MADAM. Both region-of-interest and voxel-wise whole brain analyses were performed. Patients with BED showed increased SERT binding in the parieto-occipital cortical regions compared to both PG and healthy controls, with parallel decreases in binding in the nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal gyrus and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. No differences between PG patients and controls were observed. None of the subjects were on SSRI medications at the time of imaging, and there were no differences in the level of depression between PG and BED patients. The results highlight differences in brain SERT binding between individuals with BED and PG and provide further evidence of different neurobiological underpinnings in behavioral addictions that are unrelated to the co-existing mood disorder. The results aid in the conceptualization of behavioral addictions by characterizing the underlying serotonin changes and provide a framework for additional studies to examine syndrome-specific pharmaceutical treatments. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.