Browsing by Subject "Ursodeoxycholic acid"

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  • Hague, William M.; Callaway, Leonie; Chambers, Jennifer; Chappell, Lucy; Coat, Suzette; de Haan-Jebbink, Jiska; Dekker, Marloes; Dixon, Peter; Dodd, Jodie; Fuller, Maria; Gordijn, Sanne; Graham, Dorothy; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Hennessy, Annemarie; Kaaja, Risto; Khong, Teck Yee; Lampio, Laura; Louise, Jennie; Makris, Angela; Markus, Corey; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Middleton, Philippa; Mol, Ben W.; Morris, Jonathan; Newnham, John P.; Ovadia, Caroline; Peek, Michael; Shand, Antonia; Stark, Michael; Thornton, Jim; Timonen, Susanna; Walker, Susan; Warrilow, David; Williamson, Catherine (2021)
    BackgroundSevere early onset (less than 34weeks gestation) intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) affects 0.1% of pregnant women in Australia and is associated with a 3-fold increased risk of stillbirth, fetal hypoxia and compromise, spontaneous preterm birth, as well as increased frequencies of pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes. ICP is often familial and overlaps with other cholestatic disorders.Treatment options for ICP are not well established, although there are limited data to support the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) to relieve pruritus, the main symptom. Rifampicin, a widely used antibiotic including in pregnant women, is effective in reducing pruritus in non-pregnancy cholestasis and has been used as a supplement to UDCA in severe ICP. Many women with ICP are electively delivered preterm, although there are no randomised data to support this approach.MethodsWe have initiated an international multicentre randomised clinical trial to compare the clinical efficacy of rifampicin tablets (300mg bd) with that of UDCA tablets (up to 2000mg daily) in reducing pruritus in women with ICP, using visual pruritus scores as a measuring tool.DiscussionOur study will be the first to examine the outcomes of treatment specifically in the severe early onset form of ICP, comparing "standard" UDCA therapy with rifampicin, and so be able to provide for the first-time high-quality evidence for use of rifampicin in severe ICP. It will also allow an assessment of feasibility of a future trial to test whether elective early delivery in severe ICP is beneficial.Trial identifiersAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registration Number (ANZCTR): 12618000332224p (29/08/2018). HREC No: HREC/18/WCHN/36.EudraCT number: 2018-004011-44.IRAS: 272398.NHMRC registration: APP1152418 and APP117853.
  • Hague, William M; Callaway, Leonie; Chambers, Jennifer; Chappell, Lucy; Coat, Suzette; de Haan-Jebbink, Jiska; Dekker, Marloes; Dixon, Peter; Dodd, Jodie; Fuller, Maria; Gordijn, Sanne; Graham, Dorothy; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Hennessy, Annemarie; Kaaja, Risto; Khong, Teck Y; Lampio, Laura; Louise, Jennie; Makris, Angela; Markus, Corey; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Middleton, Philippa; Mol, Ben W; Morris, Jonathan; Newnham, John P; Ovadia, Caroline; Peek, Michael; Shand, Antonia; Stark, Michael; Thornton, Jim; Timonen, Susanna; Walker, Susan; Warrilow, David; Williamson, Catherine (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background Severe early onset (less than 34 weeks gestation) intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) affects 0.1% of pregnant women in Australia and is associated with a 3-fold increased risk of stillbirth, fetal hypoxia and compromise, spontaneous preterm birth, as well as increased frequencies of pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes. ICP is often familial and overlaps with other cholestatic disorders. Treatment options for ICP are not well established, although there are limited data to support the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) to relieve pruritus, the main symptom. Rifampicin, a widely used antibiotic including in pregnant women, is effective in reducing pruritus in non-pregnancy cholestasis and has been used as a supplement to UDCA in severe ICP. Many women with ICP are electively delivered preterm, although there are no randomised data to support this approach. Methods We have initiated an international multicentre randomised clinical trial to compare the clinical efficacy of rifampicin tablets (300 mg bd) with that of UDCA tablets (up to 2000 mg daily) in reducing pruritus in women with ICP, using visual pruritus scores as a measuring tool. Discussion Our study will be the first to examine the outcomes of treatment specifically in the severe early onset form of ICP, comparing “standard” UDCA therapy with rifampicin, and so be able to provide for the first-time high-quality evidence for use of rifampicin in severe ICP. It will also allow an assessment of feasibility of a future trial to test whether elective early delivery in severe ICP is beneficial. Trial identifiers Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registration Number (ANZCTR): 12618000332224p (29/08/2018). HREC No: HREC/18/WCHN/36. EudraCT number: 2018–004011-44. IRAS: 272398. NHMRC registration: APP1152418 and APP117853.
  • Stenman, Lotta K.; Holma, Reetta; Korpela, Riitta (2012)
  • Fickert, Peter; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Denk, Gerald; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Altorjay, Istvan; Farkkila, Martti; Schramm, Christoph; Spengler, Ulrich; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Schrumpf, Erik; Nevens, Frederik; Trivedi, Palak; Reiter, Florian P.; Tornai, Istvan; Halilbasic, Emina; Greinwald, Roland; Pröls, Markus; Manns, Michael P.; Trauner, Michael; European PSC norUDCA Study Grp (2017)
    Background & Aim: Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) represents a devastating bile duct disease, currently lacking effective medical therapy. 24-norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) is a side chain-shortened C-23 homologue of UDCA and has shown potent anti-cholestatic, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic properties in a preclinical PSC mouse model. A randomized controlled trial, including 38 centers from 12 European countries, evaluated the safety and efficacy of three doses of oral norUDCA (500 mg/d, 1,000 mg/d or 1,500 mg/d) compared with placebo in patients with PSC. Methods: One hundred sixty-one PSC patients without concomitant UDCA therapy and with elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels were randomized for a 12-week treatment followed by a 4-week follow-up. The primary efficacy endpoint was the mean relative change in ALP levels between baseline and end of treatment visit. Results: norUDCA reduced ALP levels by -12.3%, -17.3%, and -26.0% in the 500, 1,000, and 1,500 mg/d groups (p = 0.029, tively, while a +1.2% increase was observed in the placebo group. Similar dose-dependent results were found for secondary end-points, such as ALT, AST, gamma-GT, or the rate of patients achieving ALP levels <1.5 x ULN. Serious adverse events occurred in seven patients in the 500 mg/d, five patients in the 1,000 mg/d, two patients in the 1500 mg/d group, and three in the placebo group. There was no difference in reported pruritus between treatment and placebo groups. Conclusions: norUDCA significantly reduced ALP values dose-dependently in all treatment arms. The safety profile of norUDCA was excellent and comparable to placebo. Consequently, these results justify a phase III trial of norUDCA in PSC patients. Lay summary: Effective medical therapy for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is urgently needed. In this phase II clinical study in PSC patients, a side chain-shortened derivative of ursodeoxycholic acid, norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA), significantly reduced serum alkaline phosphatase levels in a dose-dependent manner during a 12-week treatment. Importantly, norUDCA showed a favorable safety profile, which was similar to placebo. The use of norUDCA in PSC patients is promising and will be further evaluated in a phase III clinical study. (C) 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Nordic Pediat Surg Study Consortiu (2018)
    Background/purpose: Biliary atresia is the most common reason for newborn cholestasis and pediatric liver transplantation. Even after normalization of serum bilirubin after portoenterostomy, most patients require liver transplantation by adulthood due to expanding fibrosis. We addressed contemporary outcomes of biliary atresia in the Nordic countries. Methods: Data on center and patients characteristics, diagnostic practices, surgical treatment, adjuvant medical therapy after portoenterostomy, follow-up and outcomes were collected from all the Nordic centers involved with biliary atresia care during 2005-2016. Results: Of the 154 patients, 148 underwent portoenterostomy mostly by assigned surgical teams at median age of 64 (interquartile range 37-79) days, and 95 patients (64%) normalized their serum bilirubin concentration while living with native liver. Postoperative adjuvant medical therapy, including steroids, ursodeoxycholic acid and antibiotics was given to 137 (93%) patients. Clearance of jaundice associated with young age at surgery and favorable anatomic type of biliary atresia, whereas annual center caseload >3 patients and diagnostic protocol without routine liver biopsy predicted early performance of portoenterostomy. The cumulative 5-year native liver and overall survival estimate was 53% (95% CI 45-62) and 88% (95% CI 83-94), respectively. Portoenterostomy age 3 patients were predictive for long-term native liver survival, while normalization of serum bilirubin after portoenterostomy was the major predictor of both native liver and overall 5-year survival. Conclusions: The outcomes of biliary atresia in the Nordic countries compared well with previous European studies. Further improvement should be pursued by active measures to reduce patient age at portoenterostomy. Retrospective prognosis study: Level II. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.