Browsing by Subject "VIROME"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-6 of 6
  • Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Popov, Vsevolod; Guzman, Hilda; Phan, Tung Gia; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert; Delwart, Eric (2017)
    Eleven viral isolates derived mostly in albopictus C6/36 cells from mosquito pools collected in Southeast Asia and the Americas between 1966 and 2014 contained particles with electron microscopy morphology typical of reoviruses. Metagenomics analysis yielded the near complete genomes of three novel reoviruses, Big Cypress orbivirus, Ninarumi virus, and High Island virus and a new tetravirus, Sarawak virus. Strains of previously characterized Sathuvarachi, Yunnan, Banna and Parry's Lagoon viruses (Reoviridae), Bontang virus (Mesoniviridae), and Culex theileri flavivirus (Flaviviridae) were also characterized. The availability of these mosquito virus genomes will facilitate their detection by metagenomics or PCR to better determine their geographic range, extent of host tropism, and possible association with arthropod or vertebrate disease.
  • Karcher, Nicolai; Nigro, Eleonora; Puncochar, Michal; Blanco-Miguez, Aitor; Ciciani, Matteo; Manghi, Paolo; Zolfo, Moreno; Cumbo, Fabio; Manara, Serena; Golzato, Davide; Cereseto, Anna; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Bui, Thi Phuong Nam; Tytgat, Hanne L. P.; Valles-Colomer, Mireia; de Vos, Willem M.; Segata, Nicola (2021)
    Background Akkermansia muciniphila is a human gut microbe with a key role in the physiology of the intestinal mucus layer and reported associations with decreased body mass and increased gut barrier function and health. Despite its biomedical relevance, the genomic diversity of A. muciniphila remains understudied and that of closely related species, except for A. glycaniphila, unexplored. Results We present a large-scale population genomics analysis of the Akkermansia genus using 188 isolate genomes and 2226 genomes assembled from 18,600 metagenomes from humans and other animals. While we do not detect A. glycaniphila, the Akkermansia strains in the human gut can be grouped into five distinct candidate species, including A. muciniphila, that show remarkable whole-genome divergence despite surprisingly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences. These candidate species are likely human-specific, as they are detected in mice and non-human primates almost exclusively when kept in captivity. In humans, Akkermansia candidate species display ecological co-exclusion, diversified functional capabilities, and distinct patterns of associations with host body mass. Analysis of CRISPR-Cas loci reveals new variants and spacers targeting newly discovered putative bacteriophages. Remarkably, we observe an increased relative abundance of Akkermansia when cognate predicted bacteriophages are present, suggesting ecological interactions. A. muciniphila further exhibits subspecies-level genetic stratification with associated functional differences such as a putative exo/lipopolysaccharide operon. Conclusions We uncover a large phylogenetic and functional diversity of the Akkermansia genus in humans. This variability should be considered in the ongoing experimental and metagenomic efforts to characterize the health-associated properties of A. muciniphila and related bacteria.
  • Manrique, Pilar; Zhu, Yifan; van der Oost, John; Herrema, Hilde; Nieuwdorp, Max; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark (2021)
    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a growing public health concern worldwide. Individuals with MetS have an increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease and type 2 diabetes (T2D). These diseases–in part preventable with the treatment of MetS–increase the chances of premature death and pose a great economic burden to health systems. A healthy gut microbiota is associated with a reduction in MetS, T2D, and CV disease. Treatment of MetS with fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) can be effective, however, its success rate is intermediate and difficult to predict. Because bacteriophages significantly affect the microbiota membership and function, the aim of this pilot study was to explore the dynamics of the gut bacteriophage community after FMT in MetS subjects. We performed a longitudinal study of stool bacteriophages from healthy donors and MetS subjects before and after FMT treatment. Subjects were assigned to either a control group (self-stool transplant, n = 3) or a treatment group (healthy-donor-stool transplant; n-recipients = 6, n-donors = 5). Stool samples were collected over an 18-week period and bacteriophage-like particles were purified and sequenced. We found that FMT from healthy donors significantly alters the gut bacteriophage community. Subjects with better clinical outcome clustered closer to the heathy donor group, suggesting that throughout the treatment, their bacteriophage community was more similar to healthy donors. Finally, we identified bacteriophage groups that could explain these differences and we examined their prevalence in individuals from a larger cohort of MetS FMT trial. Trial information- http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=2705; NTR 2705.
  • Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J. (2016)
    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20-50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health.
  • Haak, Bastiaan W.; Argelaguet, R.; Kinsella, C.M.; Kullberg, R.F.J.; Lankelma, J.M.; Deijs, M.; Klein, M.; Jebbink, M.F.; Hugenholtz, F.; Kostidis, S.; Giera, M.; Hakvoort, T.B.M.; De Jonge, W.J.; Schultz, M.J.; Gool, T.V.; Van Der Poll, T.; De Vos, W.M.; Van Der Hoek, L.M.; Wiersingaa, W. Joost (2021)
    Bacterial microbiota play a critical role in mediating local and systemic immunity, and shifts in these microbial communities have been linked to impaired outcomes in critical illness. Emerging data indicate that other intestinal organisms, including bacteriophages, viruses of eukaryotes, fungi, and protozoa, are closely interlinked with the bacterial microbiota and their host, yet their collective role during antibiotic perturbation and critical illness remains to be elucidated. We employed multi-omics factor analysis (MOFA) to systematically integrate the bacterial (16S rRNA), fungal (intergenic transcribed spacer 1 rRNA), and viral (virus discovery next generation sequencing) components of the intestinal microbiota of 33 critically ill patients with and without sepsis and 13 healthy volunteers. In addition, we quantified the absolute abundances of bacteria and fungi using 16S and 18S rRNA PCRs and characterized the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) butyrate, acetate, and propionate using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We observe that a loss of the anaerobic intestinal environment is directly correlated with an overgrowth of aerobic pathobionts and their corresponding bacteriophages as well as an absolute enrichment of opportunistic yeasts capable of causing invasive disease. We also observed a strong depletion of SCFAs in both disease states, which was associated with an increased absolute abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria. Therefore, these findings illustrate the complexity of transkingdom changes following disruption of the intestinal bacterial microbiome. IMPORTANCE While numerous studies have characterized antibiotic-induced disruptions of the bacterial microbiome, few studies describe how these disruptions impact the composition of other kingdoms such as viruses, fungi, and protozoa. To address this knowledge gap, we employed MOFA to systematically integrate viral, fungal, and bacterial sequence data from critically ill patients (with and without sepsis) and healthy volunteers, both prior to and following exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics. In doing so, we show that modulation of the bacterial component of the microbiome has implications extending beyond this kingdom alone, enabling the overgrowth of potentially invasive fungi and viruses. While numerous preclinical studies have described similar findings in vitro, we confirm these observations in humans using an integrative analytic approach. These findings underscore the potential value of multi-omics data integration tools in interrogating how different components of the microbiota contribute to disease states. In addition, our findings suggest that there is value in further studying potential adjunctive therapies using anaerobic bacteria or SCFAs to reduce fungal expansion after antibiotic exposure, which could ultimately lead to improved outcomes in the intensive care unit (ICU).
  • Phan, Tung Gia; del Valle Mendoza, Juana; Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Altan, Eda; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric (2018)
    Serum samples collected from 88 Peruvians with unexplained fever were analyzed for viral sequences using metagenomics. Nucleic acids of anelloviruses, pegivirus A (GBV-C), HIV, Dengue virus, and Oropouche virus were detected. We also characterized from two sera the RNA genomes of new species of partitivirus and dicistrovirus belonging to viral families known to infect fungi or arthropod, respectively. Genomic DNA of a putative fungal cellular host could be PCR amplified from the partitivirus-containing serum sample. The detection in human serum of nucleic acids from viral families not known to infect vertebrates may indicate contamination during sample collection and aliquoting or human infection by their presumed cellular host, here a fungus. The role, if any, of the non-vertebrate infecting viruses detected in serum in inducing fever is unknown.