Browsing by Subject "VIRUS"

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  • Gutierrez, Alejandro P.; Bean, Tim P.; Hooper, Chantelle; Stenton, Craig A.; Sanders, Matthew B.; Paley, Richard K.; Rastas, Pasi; Bryrom, Michaela; Matika, Oswald; Houston, Ross D. (2018)
    Ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV) can cause mass mortality events in Pacific oyster aquaculture. While various factors impact on the severity of outbreaks, it is clear that genetic resistance of the host is an important determinant of mortality levels. This raises the possibility of selective breeding strategies to improve the genetic resistance of farmed oyster stocks, thereby contributing to disease control. Traditional selective breeding can be augmented by use of genetic markers, either via marker-assisted or genomic selection. The aim of the current study was to investigate the genetic architecture of resistance to OsHV in Pacific oyster, to identify genomic regions containing putative resistance genes, and to inform the use of genomics to enhance efforts to breed for resistance. To achieve this, a population of approximate to 1,000 juvenile oysters were experimentally challenged with a virulent form of OsHV, with samples taken from mortalities and survivors for genotyping and qPCR measurement of viral load. The samples were genotyped using a recently-developed SNP array, and the genotype data were used to reconstruct the pedigree. Using these pedigree and genotype data, the first high density linkage map was constructed for Pacific oyster, containing 20,353 SNPs mapped to the ten pairs of chromosomes. Genetic parameters for resistance to OsHV were estimated, indicating a significant but low heritability for the binary trait of survival and also for viral load measures (h2 0.12 - 0.25). A genome-wide association study highlighted a region of linkage group 6 containing a significant QTL affecting host resistance. These results are an important step toward identification of genes underlying resistance to OsHV in oyster, and a step toward applying genomic data to enhance selective breeding for disease resistance in oyster aquaculture.
  • Mozhgani, Sayed-Hamidreza; Piran, Mehran; Zarei-Ghobadi, Mohadeseh; Jafari, Mohieddin; Jazayeri, Seyed-Mohammad; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Teymoori-Rad, Majid; Valizadeh, Narges; Farajifard, Hamid; Mirzaie, Mehdi; Khamseh, Azam; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Rezaee, Seyed-Abdolrahim; Norouzi, Mehdi (2019)
    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive disease of the central nervous system that significantly affected spinal cord, nevertheless, the pathogenesis pathway and reliable biomarkers have not been well determined. This study aimed to employ high throughput meta-analysis to find major genes that are possibly involved in the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. Results High-throughput statistical analyses identified 832, 49, and 22 differentially expressed genes for normal vs. ACs, normal vs. HAM/TSP, and ACs vs. HAM/TSP groups, respectively. The protein-protein interactions between DEGs were identified in STRING and further network analyses highlighted 24 and 6 hub genes for normal vs. HAM/TSP and ACs vs. HAM/TSP groups, respectively. Moreover, four biologically meaningful modules including 251 genes were identified for normal vs. ACs. Biological network analyses indicated the involvement of hub genes in many vital pathways like JAK-STAT signaling pathway, interferon, Interleukins, and immune pathways in the normal vs. HAM/TSP group and Metabolism of RNA, Viral mRNA Translation, Human T cell leukemia virus 1 infection, and Cell cycle in the normal vs. ACs group. Moreover, three major genes including STAT1, TAP1, and PSMB8 were identified by network analysis. Real-time PCR revealed the meaningful down-regulation of STAT1 in HAM/TSP samples than AC and normal samples (P = 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively), up-regulation of PSMB8 in HAM/TSP samples than AC and normal samples (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively), and down-regulation of TAP1 in HAM/TSP samples than those in AC and normal samples (P = 0.008 and P = 0.02, respectively). No significant difference was found among three groups in terms of the percentage of T helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (P = 0.55 and P = 0.12). Conclusions High-throughput data integration disclosed novel hub genes involved in important pathways in virus infection and immune systems. The comprehensive studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the pathogenesis pathways and also biomarkers of complex diseases.
  • Truong Nguyen, Phuoc; Garcia-Valle, Santiago; Puigbo, Pere (2021)
    Early characterization of emerging viruses is essential to control their spread, such as the Zika Virus outbreak in 2014. Among other non-viral factors, host information is essential for the surveillance and control of virus spread. Flaviviruses (genus Flavivirus), akin to other viruses, are modulated by high mutation rates and selective forces to adapt their codon usage to that of their hosts. However, a major challenge is the identification of potential hosts for novel viruses. Usually, potential hosts of emerging zoonotic viruses are identified after several confirmed cases. This is inefficient for deterring future outbreaks. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm to identify the host range of a virus from its raw genome sequences. The proposed strategy relies on comparing codon usage frequencies across viruses and hosts, by means of a normalized Codon Adaptation Index (CAI). We have tested our algorithm on 94 flaviviruses and 16 potential hosts. This novel method is able to distinguish between arthropod and vertebrate hosts for several flaviviruses with high values of accuracy (virus group 91.9% and host type 86.1%) and specificity (virus group 94.9% and host type 79.6%), in comparison to empirical observations. Overall, this algorithm may be useful as a complementary tool to current phylogenetic methods in monitoring current and future viral outbreaks by understanding host-virus relationships.
  • Becker, Daniel J.; Hall, Richard J.; Forbes, Kristian M.; Plowright, Raina K.; Altizer, Sonia (2018)
  • Levanova, Alesia; Poranen, Minna Marjetta (2018)
    Steric exclusion chromatography (SXC) is a method for separation of large target solutes based on their association with a hydrophilic stationary phase through mutual steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Selectivity in SXC is determined by the size or shape (or both) of the solutes alongside the size and concentration of PEG molecules. Elution is achieved by decreasing the PEG concentration. In this study, SXC applicability for the separation and purification of single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) RNA molecules was evaluated for the first time. The retention of ssRNA and dsRNA molecules of different lengths on convective interaction media (CIM) monolithic columns was systematically studied under variable PEG-6000 and NaCl concentrations. We determined that over 90% of long ssRNAs (700-6374 nucleotides) and long dsRNAs (500-6374 base pairs) are retained on the stationary phase in 15% PEG-6000 and >= 0.4 M NaCl. dsDNA and dsRNA molecules of the same length were partially separated by SXC. Separation of RNA molecules below 100 nucleotides from longer RNA species is easily achieved by SXC. Furthermore, SXC has the potential to separate dsRNAs from ssRNAs of the same length. We also demonstrated that SXC is suitable for the enrichment of ssRNA (PRR1 bacteriophage) and dsRNA (Phi6 bacteriophage) viral genomes from contaminating cellular RNA species. In summary, SXC on CIM monolithic columns is an appropriate tool for rapid RNA separation and concentration. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • Stass, Robert; Ilca, Serban L.; Huiskonen, Juha T. (2018)
    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is widely used to determine high-resolution structures of symmetric virus capsids. The method holds promise for extending studies beyond purified capsids and their symmetric protein shells, The non-symmetric genome component has been addressed in dsRNA cypoviruses and ssRNA bacteriophages Q beta and MS2. The structure of human herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids has been determined within intact virions to resolve capsid-tegument interactions. Electron tomography under cryogenic conditions (cryo-ET), has allowed resolving an early membrane fusion intermediate of Rift Valley fever virus. Antibody-affinity based sample grids allow capturing of virions directly from cell cultures or even clinical samples. These and other emerging methods will support studies to address viral entry, assembly and neutralization processes at increasingly high resolutions and native conditions.
  • Mäntynen, Sari; Laanto, Elina; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Poranen, Minna M.; Diaz-Munoz, Samuel L. (2021)
    The canonical lytic-lysogenic binary has been challenged in recent years, as more evidence has emerged on alternative bacteriophage infection strategies. These infection modes are little studied, and yet they appear to be more abundant and ubiquitous in nature than previously recognized, and can play a significant role in the ecology and evolution of their bacterial hosts. In this review, we discuss the extent, causes and consequences of alternative phage lifestyles, and clarify conceptual and terminological confusion to facilitate research progress. We propose distinct definitions for the terms 'pseudolysogeny' and 'productive or non-productive chronic infection', and distinguish them from the carrier state life cycle, which describes a population-level phenomenon. Our review also finds that phages may change their infection modes in response to environmental conditions or the physiological state of the host cell. We outline known molecular mechanisms underlying the alternative phage-host interactions, including specific genetic pathways and their considerable biotechnological potential. Moreover, we discuss potential implications of the alternative phage lifestyles for microbial biology and ecosystem functioning, as well as applied topics such as phage therapy.
  • Nordgren, Heli; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Sironen, Tarja; Kinnunen, Paula M.; Kivisto, Ilkka; Raunio-Saarnisto, Mirja; Moisander-Jylha, Anna-Maria; Korpela, Johanna; Kokkonen, Ulla-Maija; Hetzel, Udo; Sukura, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli (2014)
  • Keller, Saskia; Hetzel, Udo; Sironen, Tarja; Korzyukov, Yegor; Vapalahti, Olli; Kipar, Anja; Hepojoki, Jussi (2017)
    Boid inclusion body disease (BIBD) is an often fatal disease affecting mainly constrictor snakes. BIBD has been associated with infection, and more recently with coinfection, by various reptarenavirus species (family Arenaviridae). Thus far BIBD has only been reported in captive snakes, and neither the incubation period nor the route of transmission are known. Herein we provide strong evidence that co-infecting reptarenavirus species can be vertically transmitted in Boa constrictor. In total we examined five B. constrictor clutches with offspring ranging in age from embryos over perinatal abortions to juveniles. The mother and/or father of each clutch were initially diagnosed with BIBD andor reptarenavirus infection by detection of the pathognomonic inclusion bodies (IB) andor reptarenaviral RNA. By applying next-generation sequencing and de novo sequence assembly we determined the "reptarenavirome " of each clutch, yielding several nearly complete L and S segments of multiple reptarenaviruses. We further confirmed vertical transmission of the co-infecting reptarenaviruses by species-specific RT-PCR from samples of parental animals and offspring. Curiously, not all offspring obtained the full parental "reptarenavirome". We extended our findings by an in vitro approach; cell cultures derived from embryonal samples rapidly developed IB and promoted replication of some or all parental viruses. In the tissues of embryos and perinatal abortions, viral antigen was sometimes detected, but IB were consistently seen only in the juvenile snakes from the age of 2 mo onwards. In addition to demonstrating vertical transmission of multiple species, our results also indicate that reptarenavirus infection induces BIBD over time in the offspring.
  • Eskelin, Katri Johanna; Poranen, Minna Marjetta (2018)
    Viruses protect their genomes by enclosing them into protein capsids that sometimes contain lipid bilayers that either reside above or below the protein layer. Controlled dissociation of virions provides important information on virion composition, interactions, and stoichiometry of virion components, as well as their possible role in virus life cycles. Dissociation of viruses can be achieved by using various chemicals, enzymatic treatments, and incubation conditions. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is a gentle method where the separation is based on size. Here, we applied AF4 for controlled dissociation of enveloped bacteriophage phi 6. Our results indicate that AF4 can be used to assay the efficiency of the dissociation process and to purify functional subviral particles.
  • Kainulainen, Veera; Elf, Sonja; Susi, Petri; Mäki, Minna; Pitkäranta, Anne; Koskinen, Janne O.; Korpela, Riitta; Eboigbodin, Kevin E. (2019)
    Background: Rhinovirus (RV), a major cause of respiratory infection in humans, imposes an enormous economic burden due to the direct and indirect costs associated with the illness. Accurate and timely diagnosis is crucial for deciding the appropriate clinical approach and minimizing unnecessary prescription of antibiotics. Diagnosis of RV is extremely challenging due to genetic and serological variability among its numerous types and their similarity to enteroviruses. Objective: We sought to develop a rapid nucleic acid test that can be used for the detection of Rhinovirus within both laboratory and near patient settings. Study design: We developed and evaluated a novel isothermal nucleic acid amplification method called Reverse Transcription Strand Invasion-Based Amplification (RT-SIBA) to rapidly detect Rhinovirus from clinical specimens. Result: The method, RT-SIBA, detected RV in clinical specimens with high analytical sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%). The time to positive result was significantly shorter for the RV RT-SIBA assay than for a reference RV nucleic acid amplification method (RT-qPCR). Conclusion: The rapid detection time of the RV SIBA assay, as well as its compatibility with portable instruments, will facilitate prompt diagnosis of infection and thereby improve patient care.
  • Malm, Maria; Hyoty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna (2019)
    Most of the research effort to understand protective immunity against norovirus (NoV) has focused on humoral immunity, whereas immunity against another major pediatric enteric virus, rotavirus (RV), has been studied more thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate development of cell-mediated immunity to NoV in early childhood. Immune responses to NoV GI.3 and GII. 4 virus-like particles and RV VP6 were determined in longitudinal blood samples of 10 healthy children from three months to four years of age. Serum IgG antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and production of interferon-gamma by peripheral blood T cells was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. NoV-specific T cells were detected in eight of 10 children by the age of four, with some individual variation. T cell responses to NoV GII.4 were higher than those to GI.3, but these responses were generally lower than responses to RV VP6. In contrast to NoV-specific antibodies, T cell responses were transient in nature. No correlation between cell-mediated and antibody responses was observed. NoV exposure induces vigorous T cell responses in children under five years of age, similar to RV. A role of T cells in protection from NoV infection in early childhood warrants further investigation.
  • Nokireki, Tiina; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Virtala, Anna-Maija; Sihvonen, Liisa (2017)
    Background: Rabies is preventable by pre-and/or post-exposure prophylaxis consisting of series of rabies vaccinations and in some cases the use of immunoglobulins. The success of vaccination can be estimated either by measuring virus neutralising antibodies or by challenge experiment. Vaccines based on rabies virus offer cross-protection against other lyssaviruses closely related to rabies virus. The aim was to assess the success of rabies vaccination measured by the antibody response in dogs (n = 10,071) and cats (n = 722), as well as to investigate the factors influencing the response to vaccination when animals failed to reach a rabies antibody titre of = 0.5 IU/ml. Another aim was to assess the level of protection afforded by a commercial veterinary rabies vaccine against intracerebral challenge in mice with European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) and classical rabies virus (RABV), and to compare this with the protection offered by a vaccine for humans. Results: A significantly higher proportion of dogs (10.7%, 95% confidence interval CI 10.1-11.3) than cats (3.5%; 95% CI 2.3-5.0) had a vaccination antibody titre of <0.5 IU/ml. In dogs, vaccination with certain vaccines, vaccination over 6 months prior the time of antibody determination and vaccination of dogs with a size of > 60 cm or larger resulted in a higher risk of failing to reach an antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml. When challenged with EBLV-2 and RABV, 80 and 100% of mice vaccinated with the veterinary rabies vaccine survived, respectively. When mice were vaccinated with the human rabies vaccine and challenged with EBLV-2, 75-80% survived, depending on the booster. All vaccinated mice developed sufficient to high titres of virus-neutralising antibodies (VNA) against RABV 21-22 days post-vaccination, ranging from 0.5 to 128 IU/ml. However, there was significant difference between antibody titres after vaccinating once in comparison to vaccinating twice (P <0.05). Conclusions: There was a significant difference between dogs and cats in their ability to reach a post vaccination antibody titre of = 0.5 IU/ml. Mice vaccinated with RABV-based rabies vaccines were partly cross-protected against EBLV-2, but there was no clear correlation between VNA titres and cross-protection against EBLV-2. Measurement of the RABV VNA titre can only be seen as a partial tool to estimate the cross-protection against other lyssaviruses. Booster vaccination is recommended for dogs and cats if exposed to infected bats.
  • Hautala, Timo; Partanen, Terhi; Sironen, Tarja; Rajaniemi, Saara-Mari; Hautala, Nina; Vainio, Olli; Vapalahti, Olli; Kauma, Heikki; Vaheri, Antti (2013)
  • Roman, Veronica L.; Merlin, Christophe; Virta, Marko P. J.; Bellanger, Xavier (2021)
    EpicPCR (Emulsion, Paired Isolation and Concatenation PCR) is a recent single-cell genomic method based on a fusion-PCR allowing us to link a functional sequence of interest to a 16S rRNA gene fragment and use the mass sequencing of the resulting amplicons for taxonomic assignment of the functional sequence-carrying bacteria. Although it is interesting because it presents the highest efficiency for assigning a bacterial host to a marker, epicPCR remains a complex multistage procedure with technical difficulties that may easily impair the approach depth and quality. Here, we described how to adapt epicPCR to new gene targets and environmental matrices while identifying the natural host range of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements in water microbial communities from the Meurthe River (France). We notably show that adding a supplementary PCR step allowed us to increase the amplicon yield and thus the number of reads obtained after sequencing. A comparison of operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identification approaches when using biological and technical replicates demonstrated that, although OTUs can be validated when obtained from three out of three technical replicates, up to now, results obtained from two or three biological replicates give a similar and even a better confidence level in OTU identification, while allowing us to detect poorly represented SXT/R391 hosts in microbial communities.
  • Castel, Guillaume; Tordo, Noel; Plyusnin, Alexander (2017)
    Because of the great variability of their reservoir hosts, hantaviruses are excellent models to evaluate the dynamics of virus-host co-evolution. Intriguing questions remain about the timescale of the diversification events that influenced this evolution. In this paper we attempted to estimate the first ever timing of hantavirus diversification based on thirty five available complete genomes representing five major groups of hantaviruses and the assumption of co-speciation of hantaviruses with their respective mammal hosts. Phylogenetic analyses were used to estimate the main diversification points during hantavirus evolution in mammals while host diversification was mostly estimated from independent calibrators taken from fossil records. Our results support an earlier developed hypothesis of co-speciation of known hantaviruses with their respective mammal hosts and hence a common ancestor for all hantaviruses carried by placental mammals. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Ling, Jiaxin; Smura, Teemu; Tamarit, Daniel; Huitu, Otso; Voutilainen, Liina; Henttonen, Heikki; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Sironen, Tarja (2018)
    Hantaviruses have co-existed with their hosts for millions of years. Seewis virus (SWSV), a soricomorph-borne hantavirus, is widespread in Eurasia, ranging from Central Siberia to Western Europe. To gain insight into the phylogeography and evolutionary history of SWSV in Finland, lung tissue samples of 225 common shrews (Sorex araneus) trapped from different parts of Finland were screened for the presence of SWSV RNA. Forty-two of the samples were positive. Partial small (S), medium (M) and large (L) segments of the virus were sequenced, and analyzed together with all SWSV sequences available in Genbank. The phylogenetic analysis of the partial S-segment sequences suggested that all Finnish SWSV strains shared their most recent common ancestor with the Eastern European strains, while the L-segment suggested multiple introductions. The difference between the Land S-segment phylogenies implied that reassortment events play a role in the evolution of SWSV. Of the Finnish strains, variants from Eastern Finland occupied the root position in the phylogeny, and had the highest genetic diversity, supporting the hypothesis that SWSV reached Finland first form the east. During the spread in Finland, the virus has formed three separate lineages, identified here by correlation analysis of genetic versus geographic distance combined with median-joining network analysis. These results support the hypothesis that Finnish SWSV recolonized Finland with its host, the common shrew, from east after the last ice age 12,000-8000 years ago, and then subsequently spread along emerging land bridges towards west or north with the migration and population expansion of its host.
  • Brownlie, Demi; Scharenberg, Marlena; Mold, Jeff E.; Hard, Joanna; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Buggert, Marcus; Nguyen, Son; Wilson, Jennifer N.; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Marquardt, Nicole; Michaelsson, Jakob (2021)
    Human adaptive-like "memory" CD56(dim)CD16(+) natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood from cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals have been extensively investigated in recent years and are currently explored as a treatment strategy for hematological cancers. However, treatment of solid tumors remains limited due to insufficient NK cell tumor infiltration, and it is unknown whether large expansions of adaptive-like NK cells that are equipped for tissue residency and tumor homing exist in peripheral tissues. Here, we show that human lung and blood contains adaptive-like CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with hallmarks of tissue residency, including expression of CD49a. Expansions of adaptive-like lung tissue-resident NK (trNK) cells were found to be present independently of adaptive-like CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells and to be hyperresponsive toward target cells. Together, our data demonstrate that phenotypically, functionally, and developmentally distinct subsets of adaptive-like NK cells exist in human lung and blood. Given their tissue-related character and hyperresponsiveness, human lung adaptive-like trNK cells might represent a suitable alternative for therapies targeting solid tumors.
  • Sironen, Tarja; Sane, Jussi; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Meri, Seppo; Andersson, Leif C.; Hautala, Timo; Kauma, Heikki; Vuorinen, Sakari; Rasmuson, Johan; Evander, Magnus; Ahlm, Clas; Vaheri, Antti (2017)
    The case-fatality rate of hantavirus disease depends strongly on the causative hantavirus, ranging from 0.1% to 40%. However, the pathogenesis is not fully understood, and at present no licensed therapies exist. We describe fatal cases caused by Puumala hantavirus indicating involvement of complement activation and vascular leakage.