Browsing by Subject "WATER-VAPOR"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 24
  • Liu, Yuqin; De Leeuw, Gerrit; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhou, Putian; Nie, Wei; Qi, Ximeng; Hong, Juan; Wang, Yonghong; Ding, Aijun; Guo, Huadong; Kruger, Olaf; Kulmala, Markku; Petaja, Tuukka (2017)
    Aerosol effects on low warm clouds over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD, eastern China) are examined using co-located MODIS, CALIOP and CloudSat observations. By taking the vertical locations of aerosol and cloud layers into account, we use simultaneously observed aerosol and cloud data to investigate relationships between cloud properties and the amount of aerosol particles (using aerosol optical depth, AOD, as a proxy). Also, we investigate the impact of aerosol types on the variation of cloud properties with AOD. Finally, we explore how meteorological conditions affect these relationships using ERA-Interim reanalysis data. This study shows that the relation between cloud properties and AOD depends on the aerosol abundance, with a different behaviour for low and high AOD (i.e. AOD0.35). This applies to cloud droplet effective radius (CDR) and cloud fraction (CF), but not to cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud top pressure (CTP). COT is found to decrease when AOD increases, which may be due to radiative effects and retrieval artefacts caused by absorbing aerosol. Conversely, CTP tends to increase with elevated AOD, indicating that the aerosol is not always prone to expand the vertical extension. It also shows that the COT-CDR and CWP (cloud liquid water path)-CDR relationships are not unique, but affected by atmospheric aerosol loading. Furthermore, separation of cases with either polluted dust or smoke aerosol shows that aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI) is stronger for clouds mixed with smoke aerosol than for clouds mixed with dust, which is ascribed to the higher absorption efficiency of smoke than dust. The variation of cloud properties with AOD is analysed for various relative humidity and boundary layer thermodynamic and dynamic conditions, showing that high relative humidity favours larger cloud droplet particles and increases cloud formation, irrespective of vertical or horizontal level. Stable atmospheric conditions enhance cloud cover horizontally. However, unstable atmospheric conditions favour thicker and higher clouds. Dynamically, upward motion of air parcels can also facilitate the formation of thicker and higher clouds. Overall, the present study provides an understanding of the impact of aerosols on cloud properties over the YRD. In addition to the amount of aerosol particles (or AOD), evidence is provided that aerosol types and ambient environmental conditions need to be considered to understand the observed relationships between cloud properties and AOD.
  • Hoyle, C. R.; Fuchs, C.; Jaervinen, E.; Saathoff, H.; Dias, A.; El Haddad, I.; Gysel, M.; Coburn, S. C.; Troestl, J.; Bernhammer, A. -K.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Corbin, J. C.; Craven, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoeppel, N.; Heinritzi, M.; Kristensen, T. B.; Molteni, U.; Nichman, L.; Pinterich, T.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Vogel, A. L.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Wexler, A. S.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P. M.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flagan, R. C.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Moehler, O.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D. R.; Baltensperger, U. (2016)
    The growth of aerosol due to the aqueous phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone was measured in laboratory-generated clouds created in the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Experiments were performed at 10 and -10 degrees C, on acidic (sulfuric acid) and on partially to fully neutralised (ammonium sulfate) seed aerosol. Clouds were generated by performing an adiabatic expansion-pressurising the chamber to 220 hPa above atmospheric pressure, and then rapidly releasing the excess pressure, resulting in a cooling, condensation of water on the aerosol and a cloud lifetime of approximately 6 min. A model was developed to compare the observed aerosol growth with that predicted using oxidation rate constants previously measured in bulk solutions. The model captured the measured aerosol growth very well for experiments performed at 10 and -10 degrees C, indicating that, in contrast to some previous studies, the oxidation rates of SO2 in a dispersed aqueous system can be well represented by using accepted rate constants, based on bulk measurements. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first laboratory-based measurements of aqueous phase oxidation in a dispersed, supercooled population of droplets. The measurements are therefore important in confirming that the extrapolation of currently accepted reaction rate constants to temperatures below 0 degrees C is correct.
  • Lind, Saara E.; Shurpali, Narasinha J.; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Hyvonen, Niina; Maljanen, Marja; Raty, Mari; Virkajarvi, Perttu; Martikainen, Pertti J. (2016)
    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 exchange of this RCG cultivation system, and to understand the key factors controlling its CO2 exchange, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) was measured from July 2009 until the end of 2011 using the eddy covariance (EC) method. The RCG cultivation thrived well producing yields of 6200 and 6700 kg DW ha(-1) in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Gross photosynthesis (GPP) was controlled mainly by radiation from June to September. Vapour pressure deficit (VPD), air temperature or soil moisture did not limit photosynthesis during the growing season. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) increased with soil temperature, green area index and GPP. Annual NEE was -262 and -256 g C m(-2) in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Throughout the study period from July 2009 until the end of 2011, cumulative NEE was -575 g C m(-2). Carbon balance and its regulatory factors were compared to the published results of a comparison site on drained organic soil cultivated with RCG in the same climate. On this mineral soil site, the RCG had higher capacity to take up CO2 from the atmosphere than on the comparison site.
  • Odeh, Issam; Arar, Sharif; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Sa'aydeh, Hiyam; Hammad, Ghada; Duplissy, Jonathan; Vuollekoski, Henri; Korpela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hussein, Tareq (2017)
    The quality and chemical composition of urban dew collections with dust precipitates without pre-cleaning of the collecting surface WSF (white standard foil) were investigated for 16 out of 20 collected samples with collected volumes ranging from 22 to 230 ml. The collection period was from March to July 2015 at an urban area, Jubaiha, which is located in the northern part of the capital city Amman, Jordan. The obtained results indicated the predominance of Ca2+ and SO42- ions (ratio 2.2: 1) that originated from Saharan soil dust; where the collected samples were alkaline (mean pH = 7.35) with high mineralization (429.22 mg/L) exceeding the previously reported dew values in Amman-Jordan. A relocation of NaCl and to a less extent Mg2+ from sea to land by Saharan wind is indicated by the percent sea-salt fraction calculations (over 100 and 52, respectively). The collected samples exhibited high total organic carbon (TOC) values ranging from 11.86 to 74.60 mg/L, presence of particulate settled material with turbidity ranging from 20.10 to 520.00 NTU, and presence of undesired elements like boron (mean = 1.48 mg/L) that made it different in properties from other dew water collections at clean surfaces, and exceeding the standard limits for drinking water for these parameters set by Jordanian Drinking Water standards (JS286/2015)/WHO standard. The quality of this water is more close to that for raw or agricultural water but if it is meant to be used as potable source of water, at least sand and activated charcoal filters are needed to purify it.
  • Yi, Chuixiang; Ricciuto, Daniel; Li, Runze; Wolbeck, John; Xu, Xiyan; Nilsson, Mats; Aires, Luis; Albertson, John D.; Ammann, Christof; Arain, M. Altaf; de Araujo, Alessandro C.; Aubinet, Marc; Aurela, Mika; Barcza, Zoltan; Barr, Alan; Berbigier, Paul; Beringer, Jason; Bernhofer, Christian; Black, Andrew T.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Bosveld, Fred C.; Broadmeadow, Mark S. J.; Buchmann, Nina; Burns, Sean P.; Cellier, Pierre; Chen, Jiquan; Ciais, Philippe; Clement, Robert; Cook, Bruce D.; Curtis, Peter S.; Dail, D. Bryan; Dellwik, Ebba; Delpierre, Nicolas; Desai, Ankur R.; Dore, Sabina; Dragoni, Danilo; Drake, Bert G.; Dufrene, Eric; Dunn, Allison; Elbers, Jan; Eugster, Werner; Falk, Matthias; Feigenwinter, Christian; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Foken, Thomas; Frank, John; Fuhrer, Juerg; Gianelle, Damiano; Goldstein, Allen; Goulden, Mike; Granier, Andre; Gruenwald, Thomas; Gu, Lianhong; Guo, Haiqiang; Hammerle, Albin; Han, Shijie; Hanan, Niall P.; Haszpra, Laszlo; Heinesch, Bernard; Helfter, Carole; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Ibrom, Andreas; Jacobs, Cor; Johansson, Torbjoern; Jongen, Marjan; Katul, Gabriel; Kiely, Gerard; Klumpp, Katja; Knohl, Alexander; Kolb, Thomas; Kutsch, Werner L.; Lafleur, Peter; Laurila, Tuomas; Leuning, Ray; Lindroth, Anders; Liu, Heping; Loubet, Benjamin; Manca, Giovanni; Marek, Michal; Margolis, Hank A.; Martin, Timothy A.; Massman, William J.; Matamala, Roser; Matteucci, Giorgio; McCaughey, Harry; Merbold, Lutz; Meyers, Tilden; Migliavacca, Mirco; Miglietta, Franco; Misson, Laurent; Moelder, Meelis; Moncrieff, John; Monson, Russell K.; Montagnani, Leonardo; Montes-Helu, Mario; Moors, Eddy; Moureaux, Christine; Mukelabai, Mukufute M.; Munger, J. William; Myklebust, May; Nagy, Zoltan; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter; Oren, Ram; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Kyaw, Tha Paw U.; Pereira, Joao S.; Pilegaard, Kim; Pinter, Krisztina; Pio, Casimiro; Pita, Gabriel; Powell, Thomas L.; Rambal, Serge; Randerson, James T.; von Randow, Celso; Rebmann, Corinna; Rinne, Janne; Rossi, Federica; Roulet, Nigel; Ryel, Ronald J.; Sagerfors, Jorgen; Saigusa, Nobuko; Sanz, Maria Jose; Mugnozza, Giuseppe-Scarascia; Schmid, Hans Peter; Seufert, Guenther; Siqueira, Mario; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Starr, Gregory; Sutton, Mark A.; Tenhunen, John; Tuba, Zoltan; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Valentini, Riccardo; Vogel, Christoph S.; Wang, Shaoqiang; Wang, Weiguo; Welp, Lisa R.; Wen, Xuefa; Wharton, Sonia; Wilkinson, Matthew; Williams, Christopher A.; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Yamamoto, Susumu; Yu, Guirui; Zampedri, Roberto; Zhao, Bin; Zhao, Xinquan (2010)
  • Sabbatini, Simone; Mammarella, Ivan; Arriga, Nicola; Fratini, Gerardo; Graf, Alexander; Hoertriagl, Lukas; Ibrom, Andreas; Longdoz, Bernard; Mauder, Matthias; Merbold, Lutz; Metzger, Stefan; Montagnani, Leonardo; Pitacco, Andrea; Rebmann, Corinna; Sedlak, Pavel; Sigut, Ladislav; Vitale, Domenico; Papale, Dario (2018)
    The eddy covariance is a powerful technique to estimate the surface-atmosphere exchange of different scalars at the ecosystem scale. The EC method is central to the ecosystem component of the Integrated Carbon Observation System, a monitoring network for greenhouse gases across the European Continent. The data processing sequence applied to the collected raw data is complex, and multiple robust options for the different steps are often available. For Integrated Carbon Observation System and similar networks, the standardisation of methods is essential to avoid methodological biases and improve comparability of the results. We introduce here the steps of the processing chain applied to the eddy covariance data of Integrated Carbon Observation System stations for the estimation of final CO2, water and energy fluxes, including the calculation of their uncertainties. The selected methods are discussed against valid alternative options in tenns of suitability and respective drawbacks and advantages. The main challenge is to warrant standardised processing for all stations in spite of the large differences in e.g. ecosystem traits and site conditions. The main achievement of the Integrated Carbon Observation System eddy covariance data processing is making CO2 and energy flux results as comparable and reliable as possible, given the current micrometeorological understanding and the generally accepted state-of-the-art processing methods.
  • Seppälä, Anniina; Puhakka, Eini; Olin, Markus (2016)
    The swelling and cation exchange properties of montmorillonite are fundamental in a wide range of applications ranging from nanocomposites to catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons. The swelling results from several factors and, though widely studied, information on the effects of a single factor at a time is lacking. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to obtain atomic-level information on the swelling of montmorillonite. Molecular dynamics (MD) was used to investigate the swelling properties of montmorillonites with different layer charges and interlayer cationic compositions. Molecular dynamics calculations, with CLAYFF force field, consider three layer charges (-1.0, -0.66 and -0.5 e per unit cell) arising from octahedral substitutions and interlayer counterions of Na, K and Ca. The swelling curves obtained showed that smaller layer charge results in greater swelling but the type of the interlayer cation also has an effect. The DFT calculations were also seen to predict larger d values than MD. The formation of 1, 2 and 3 water molecular layers in the interlayer spaces was observed. Finally, the data from MD calculations were used to predict the self-diffusion coefficients of interlayer water and cations in different montmorillonites and in general the coefficient increased with increasing water content and with decreasing layer charge.
  • Novelli, Anna; Hens, Korbinian; Ernest, Cheryl Tatum; Martinez, Monica; Noelscher, Anke C.; Sinha, Vinayak; Paasonen, Pauli; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Elste, Thomas; Plass-Duelmer, Christian; Phillips, Gavin J.; Kubistin, Dagmar; Williams, Jonathan; Vereecken, Luc; Lelieveld, Jos; Harder, Hartwig (2017)
    We analysed the extensive dataset from the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 and the HOPE 2012 field campaigns in the boreal forest and rural environments of Finland and Germany, respectively, and estimated the abundance of stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs) in the lower troposphere. Based on laboratory tests, we propose that the background OH signal observed in our IPI-LIF-FAGE instrument during the aforementioned campaigns is caused at least partially by SCIs. This hypothesis is based on observed correlations with temperature and with concentrations of unsaturated volatile organic compounds and ozone. Just like SCIs, the background OH concentration can be removed through the addition of sulfur dioxide. SCIs also add to the previously underestimated production rate of sulfuric acid. An average estimate of the SCI concentration of similar to 5.0 x 10(4) molecules cm(-3) (with an order of magnitude uncertainty) is calculated for the two environments. This implies a very low ambient concentration of SCIs, though, over the boreal forest, significant for the conversion of SO2 into H2SO4. The large uncertainties in these calculations, owing to the many unknowns in the chemistry of Criegee intermediates, emphasise the need to better understand these processes and their potential effect on the self-cleaning capacity of the atmosphere.
  • Montagnani, Leonardo; Gruenwald, Thomas; Kowalski, Andrew; Mammarella, Ivan; Merbold, Lutz; Metzger, Stefan; Sedlak, Pavel; Siebicke, Lukas (2018)
    In eddy covariance measureinents, the storage flux represents the variation in time of the dry molar fraction of a given gas in the control volume representative of turbulent flux. Depending on the time scale considered, and on the height above ground of the measurements, it can either be a major component of the overall net ecosystem exchange or nearly negligible. Instrumental configuration and computational procedures must be optimized to measure this change at the time step used for the turbulent flux measurement Three different configurations are suitable within the Integrated Carbon Observation System infrastructure for the storage flux determination: separate sampling, subsequent sampling and mixed sampling. These configurations have their own advantages and disadvantages, and must be carefully selected based on the specific features of the considered station. In this paper, guidelines about number and distribution of vertical and horizontal sampling points are given. Details about suitable instruments, sampling devices, and computational procedures for the quantification of the storage flux of different GHG gases are also provided.
  • Korkiakoski, Mika; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Penttila, Timo; Sarkkola, Sakari; Ojanen, Paavo; Minkkinen, Kari; Rainne, Juuso; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea (2019)
    The most common forest management method in Fennoscandia is rotation forestry, including clear-cutting and forest regeneration. In clear-cutting, stem wood is removed and the logging residues are either removed or left on site. Clear-cutting changes the microclimate and vegetation structure at the site, both of which affect the site's carbon balance. Peat soils with poor aeration and high carbon densities are especially prone to such changes, and significant changes in greenhouse gas exchange can be expected. We measured carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy fluxes with the eddy covariance method for 2 years (April 2016-March 2018) after clear-cutting a drained peatland forest. We observed a significant rise (23 cm) in the water table level and a large CO2 source (first year: 3086 +/- 148 g CO2 m(-2) yr(-1); second year: 2072 +/- 124 g CO2 m(-2) yr(-1)). These large CO2 emissions resulted from the very low gross primary production (GPP) following the removal of photosynthesizing trees and the decline of ground vegetation, unable to compensate for the decomposition of logging residues and peat. During the second summer (June-August) after the clear-cutting, GPP had already increased by 96% and total ecosystem respiration decreased by 14% from the previous summer. The mean daytime ratio of sensible to latent heat flux decreased after harvesting from 2.6 in May 2016 to 1.0 in August 2016, and in 2017 it varied mostly within 0.6-1.0. In April-September, the mean daytime sensible heat flux was 33% lower and latent heat flux 40% higher in 2017, probably due to the recovery of ground vegetation that increased evapotranspiration and albedo of the site. In addition to CO2 and energy fluxes, we measured methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes with manual chambers. After the clear-cutting, the site turned from a small CH4 sink into a small source and from N2O neutral to a significant N2O source. Compared to the large CO2 emissions, the 100-year global warming potential (GWP100) of the CH4 emissions was negligible. Also, the GWP100 due to increased N2O emissions was less than 10% of that of the CO2 emission change.
  • Rebmann, Corinna; Aubinet, Marc; Schmid, Hape; Arriga, Nicola; Aurela, Mika; Burba, George; Clement, Robert; De Ligne, Anne; Fratini, Gerardo; Gielen, Bert; Grace, John; Graf, Alexander; Gross, Patrick; Haapanala, Sami; Herbst, Mathias; Hortnagl, Lukas; Ibrom, Andreas; Joly, Lilian; Kljun, Natascha; Kolle, Olaf; Kowalski, Andrew; Lindroth, Anders; Loustau, Denis; Mammarella, Ivan; Mauder, Matthias; Merbold, Lutz; Metzger, Stefan; Molder, Meelis; Montagnani, Leonardo; Papale, Dario; Pavelka, Marian; Peichl, Matthias; Roland, Marilyn; Serrano-Ortiz, Penelope; Siebicke, Lukas; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Vesala, Timo; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Franz, Daniela (2018)
    The Integrated Carbon Observation System Re-search Infrastructure aims to provide long-term, continuous observations of sources and sinks of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapour. At ICOS ecosystem stations, the principal technique for measurements of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of GHGs is the eddy-covariance technique. The establishment and setup of an eddy-covariance tower have to be carefully reasoned to ensure high quality flux measurements being representative of the investigated ecosystem and comparable to measurements at other stations. To fulfill the requirements needed for flux determination with the eddy-covariance technique, variations in GHG concentrations have to be measured at high frequency, simultaneously with the wind velocity, in order to fully capture turbulent fluctuations. This requires the use of high-frequency gas analysers and ultrasonic anemometers. In addition, to analyse flux data with respect to environmental conditions but also to enable corrections in the post-processing procedures, it is necessary to measure additional abiotic variables in close vicinity to the flux measurements. Here we describe the standards the ICOS ecosystem station network has adopted for GHG flux measurements with respect to the setup of instrumentation on towers to maximize measurement precision and accuracy while allowing for flexibility in order to observe specific ecosystem features.
  • Rannik, U.; Haapanala, S.; Shurpali, Narasinha; Mammarella, I.; Lind, Saara; Hyvönen, Niina; Peltola, O.; Zahniser, Mark; Martikainen, Pertti; Vesala, T. (2015)
    Four gas analysers capable of measuring nitrous oxide (N2O) concentration at a response time necessary for eddy covariance flux measurements were operated from spring until winter 2011 over a field cultivated with reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea, L.), a perennial bioenergy crop in eastern Finland. The instruments were TGA100A (Campbell Scientific Inc.), CW-TILDAS-CS (Aerodyne Research Inc.), N2O / CO-23d (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and QC-TILDAS-76-CS (Aerodyne Research Inc.). The period with high emissions, lasting for about 2 weeks after fertilization in late May, was characterized by an up to 2 orders of magnitude higher emission, whereas during the rest of the campaign the N2O fluxes were small, from 0.01 to 1 nmol m−2 s−1. Two instruments, CW-TILDAS-CS and N2O / CO-23d, determined the N2O exchange with minor systematic difference throughout the campaign, when operated simultaneously. TGA100A produced the cumulatively highest N2O estimates (with 29% higher values during the period when all instruments were operational). QC-TILDAS-76-CS obtained 36% lower fluxes than CW-TILDAS-CS during the first period, including the emission episode, whereas the correspondence with other instruments during the rest of the campaign was good. The reasons for systematic differences were not identified, suggesting further need for detailed evaluation of instrument performance under field conditions with emphasis on stability, calibration and any other factors that can systematically affect the accuracy of flux measurements. The instrument CW-TILDAS-CS was characterized by the lowest noise level (with a standard deviation of around 0.12 ppb at 10 Hz sampling rate) as compared to N2O / CO-23d and QC-TILDAS-76-CS (around 0.50 ppb) and TGA100A (around 2 ppb). We identified that for all instruments except CW-TILDAS-CS the random error due to instrumental noise was an important source of uncertainty at the 30 min averaging level and the total stochastic error was frequently of the same magnitude as the fluxes when N2O exchange was small at the measurement site. Both instruments based on continuous-wave quantum cascade laser, CW-TILDAS-CS and N2O / CO-23d, were able to determine the same sample of low N2O fluxes with a high mutual coefficient of determination at the 30 min averaging level and with minor systematic difference over the observation period of several months. This enables us to conclude that the new-generation instrumentation is capable of measuring small N2O exchange with high precision and accuracy at sites with low fluxes.
  • Sarnela, Nina; Jokinen, Tuija; Duplissy, Jonathan; Yan, Chao; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ehn, Mikael; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Heinritzi, Martin; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Tröstl, Jasmin; Simon, Mario; Kürten, Andreas; Leiminger, Markus; Lawler, Michael J.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Hakala, Jani; Amorim, Antonio; Gonin, Marc; Hansel, Armin; Kirkby, Jasper; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Smith, James N.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Sipilä, Mikko (2018)
    Atmospheric oxidation is an important phenomenon which produces large quantities of low-volatility compounds such as sulfuric acid and oxidized organic compounds. Such species may be involved in the nucleation of particles and enhance their subsequent growth to reach the size of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In this study, we investigate alpha-pinene, the most abundant monoterpene globally, and its oxidation products formed through ozonolysis in the Cosmic Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). By scavenging hydroxyl radicals (OH) with hydrogen (H-2), we were able to investigate the formation of highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) purely driven by ozonolysis and study the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) driven by stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs). We measured the concentrations of HOM and sulfuric acid with a chemical ionization atmospheric-pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer and compared the measured concentrations with simulated concentrations calculated with a kinetic model. We found molar yields in the range of 3.5-6.5% for HOM formation and 22-32% for the formation of stabilized Criegee intermediates by fitting our model to the measured sulfuric acid concentrations. The simulated time evolution of the ozonolysis products was in good agreement with measured concentrations except that in some of the experiments sulfuric acid formation was faster than simulated. In those experiments the simulated and measured concentrations met when the concentration reached a plateau but the plateau was reached 20-50 min later in the simulations. The results shown here are consistent with the recently published yields for HOM formation from different laboratory experiments. Together with the sCI yields, these results help us to understand atmospheric oxidation processes better and make the reaction parameters more comprehensive for broader use.
  • Atashi, Nahid; Rahimi, Dariush; Al Kuisi, Mustafa; Jiries, Anwar; Vuollekoski, Henri; Kulmala, Markku; Vesala, Timo; Hussein, Tareq (2020)
    In this study, we performed model simulations to investigate the spatial, seasonal, and annual dew yield during 40 years (1979-2018) at ten locations reflecting the variation of climate and environmental conditions in Jordan. In accordance with the climate zones in Jordan, the dew formation had distinguished characteristics features with respect to the yield, seasonal variation, and spatial variation. The highest water dew yield (an overall annual mean cumulative dew yield as high as 88 mm) was obtained for theMountains Heights Plateau, which has a Mediterranean climate. The least dew yield (as low as 19 mm) was obtained inBadia, which has an arid climate. The dew yield had a decreasing trend in the past 40 years due to climate change impacts such as increased desertification and the potential of sand and dust storms in the region. In addition, increased anthropogenic air pollution slows down the conversion of vapor to liquid phase change, which also impacts the potential of dew formation. The dew yield showed three distinguished seasonal patterns reflecting the three climates in Jordan. TheMountains Heights Plateau(Mediterranean climate) has the highest potential for dew harvesting (especially during the summer) thanBadia(semi-arid climate).
  • Bellucco, Veronica; Marras, Serena; Grimmond, C. Susan B.; Järvi, Leena; Sirca, Costantino; Spano, Donatella (2017)
    The biogenic CO2 surface atmosphere exchange is investigated and linked to vegetation cover fraction for seven sites (three urban and four non-urban) in the northern hemisphere. The non-rectangular hyperbola (NRH) is used to analyse the light-response curves during period of maximum ecophysiological processes, and to develop two models to simulate biogenic vertical CO2 fluxes. First, a generalised set of NRH coefficients is calculated after linear regression analysis across urban and non-urban ecosystems. Second, site-specific NRH coefficients are calculated for a suburban area in Helsinki, Finland. The model includes a temperature driven equation to estimate ecosystem respiration, and variation of leaf area index to modulate emissions across the year. Eddy covariance measured CO2 fluxes are used to evaluate the two models at the suburban Helsinki site and the generalised model also in Mediterranean ecosystem. Both models can simulate the mean daily trend at monthly and seasonal scales. Modelled data typically fall within the range of variability of the observations (differences of the order of 10%). Additional information improves the models performance, notably the selection of the most vegetated wind direction in Helsinki. The general model performs reasonably well during daytime but it tends to underestimate CO2 emissions at night. This reflects the model capability to catch photosynthesis processes occurring during the day, and the importance of the gross primary production (GPP) in modifying the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of urban sites with different vegetation cover fraction. Therefore, the general model does not capture the differences in ecosystem respiration that skew nocturnal fluxes. The relation between the generalised NRH plateau parameter and vegetation cover improves (R-2 from 0.7 to 0.9) when only summer weekends with wind coming from the most vegetated sector in Helsinki and well-watered conditions for Mediterranean sites are included in the analysis. In the local model, the inclusion of a temperature driven equation for estimating the ecosystem respiration instead of a constant value, does not improve the long-term simulations. In conclusion, both the general and local models have significant potential and offer valid modelling options of biogenic components of carbon exchange in urban and non-urban ecosystems.(C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Alekseychik, Pavel; Mammarella, Ivan; Karpov, Dmitry; Dengel, Sigrid; Terentieva, Irina; Sabrekov, Alexander; Glagolev, Mikhail; Lapshina, Elena (2017)
    Very few studies of ecosystem-atmosphere exchange involving eddy covariance data have been conducted in Siberia, with none in the western Siberian middle taiga. This work provides the first estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) and energy budgets in a typical bog of the western Siberian middle taiga based on May-August measurements in 2015. The footprint of measured fluxes consisted of a homogeneous mixture of tree-covered ridges and hollows with the vegetation represented by typical sedges and shrubs. Generally, the surface exchange rates resembled those of pinecovered bogs elsewhere. The surface energy balance closure approached 100 %. Net CO2 uptake was comparatively high, summing up to CO2 gCm(-2) for the four measurement months, while the Bowen ratio was seasonally stable at 28 %. The ecosystem turned into a net CO2 source during several front passage events in June and July. The periods of heavy rain helped keep the water table at a sustainably high level, preventing a usual drawdown in summer. However, because of the cloudy and rainy weather, the observed fluxes might rather represent the special weather conditions of 2015 than their typical magnitudes.
  • Mammarella, Ivan; Peltola, Olli; Nordbo, Annika; Järvi, Leena; Rannik, Üllar (2016)
    We have carried out an inter-comparison between EddyUH and EddyPro (R), two public software packages for post-field processing of eddy covariance data. Datasets including carbon dioxide, methane and water vapour fluxes measured over 2 months at a wetland in southern Finland and carbon dioxide and water vapour fluxes measured over 3 months at an urban site in Helsinki were processed and analysed. The purpose was to estimate the flux uncertainty due to the use of different software packages and to evaluate the most critical processing steps, determining the largest deviations in the calculated fluxes. Turbulent fluxes calculated with a reference combination of processing steps were in good agreement, the systematic difference between the two software packages being up to 2.0 and 6.7% for half-hour and cumulative sum values, respectively. The raw data preparation and processing steps were consistent between the software packages, and most of the deviations in the estimated fluxes were due to the flux corrections. Among the different calculation procedures analysed, the spectral correction had the biggest impact for closed-path latent heat fluxes, reaching a nocturnal median value of 15% at the wetland site. We found up to a 43% median value of deviation (with respect to the run with all corrections included) if the closed-path carbon dioxide flux is calculated without the dilution correction, while the methane fluxes were up to 10% lower without both dilution and spectroscopic corrections. The Webb-Pearman-Leuning (WPL) and spectroscopic corrections were the most critical steps for open-path systems. However, we found also large spectral correction factors for the open-path methane fluxes, due to the sensor separation effect.
  • Nordbo, Annika; Jarvi, Leena; Vesala, Timo (2012)
    Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat—in addition to net radiation measurements—were conducted for three consecutive years in an urban environment: Helsinki, Finland. The aims were to: (i) quantify the detection limit and random uncertainty of turbulent fluxes, (ii) assess the systematic error caused by EC calculation-procedure choices on the energy balance residual, and (iii) report the energy balance of the world’s northernmost urban flux station. The mean detection limits were about 10% of the observed flux, and the random uncertainty was 9–16%. Of all fluxes, the latent heat flux— as measured with a closed-path gas analyzer—was most prone to systematic calculation errors due to water vapor interactions with tube walls: using a lag window that is too small can cause a 15% lack of data (due to the dependency of lag time on relative humidity) and omitting spectral corrections can cause on average a 26% underestimation of the flux. The systematic errors in EC calculation propagate into the energy balance residual and can be larger than the residual itself: for example, omitting spectral corrections overestimates the residual by 13% or 18% on average, depending on the analyzer.
  • Jarvi, Leena; Havu, Minttu; Ward, Helen C.; Bellucco, Veronica; McFadden, Joseph P.; Toivonen, Tuuli; Heikinheimo, Vuokko; Kolari, Pasi; Riikonen, Anu; Grimmond, C. Sue B. (2019)
    There is a growing need to simulate the effect of urban planning on both local climate and greenhouse gas emissions. Here, a new urban surface carbon dioxide (CO2) flux module for the Surface Urban Energy and Water Balance Scheme is described and evaluated using eddy covariance observations at two sites in Helsinki in 2012. The spatial variability and magnitude of local-scale anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 flux components at high spatial (250 m x 250 m) and temporal (hourly) resolution are examined by combining high-resolution (down to 2 m) airborne lidar-derived land use data and mobility data to account for people's movement. Urban effects are included in the biogenic components parameterized using urban eddy covariance and chamber observations. Surface Urban Energy and Water Balance Scheme reproduces the seasonal and diurnal variability of the CO2 flux well. Annual totals deviate 3% from observations in the city center and 2% in a suburban location. In the latter, traffic is the dominant CO2 source but summertime vegetation partly offsets traffic-related emissions. In the city center, emissions from traffic and human metabolism dominate and the vegetation effect is minor due to the low proportion of vegetation surface cover (22%). Within central Helsinki, human metabolism accounts for 39% of the net local-scale emissions and together with road traffic is to a large extent responsible for the spatial variability of the emissions. Annually, the biogenic emissions and sinks are in near balance and thus the effect of vegetation on the carbon balance is small in this high-latitude city.