Browsing by Subject "WORKING PARTY"

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  • Garderet, Laurent; Ziagkos, Dimitris; Van Biezen, Anja; Iacobelli, Simona; Finke, Juergen; Maertens, Johan; Volin, Liisa; Ljungman, Per; Chevallier, Patrice; Passweg, Jakob; Schaap, Nicolaas; Beelen, Dietrich; Nagler, Arnon; Blaise, Didier; Poire, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Lenhoff, Stig; Craddock, Charles; Schots, Rik; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Sanz, Jaime; Jindra, Pavel; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Robin, Marie; Kroeger, Nicolaus (2018)
    The deletion (5q) karyotype (del [5q]) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is the most common karyotypic abnormality in de novo MDS. An increased number of blasts and additional karyotypic abnormalities (del [al]+) are associated with a poor outcome. We analyzed the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) in patients suffering from MDS with only del (5q) or del (5q)+. A total of 162 patients, of median age 54 years (range, 9 to 73), having MDS and del (5q) abnormalities received HCT from identical siblings (n = 87) or unrelated donors (n = 75). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidence at 4 years was 29% (95% CI, 22 to 36) and 46% (95% CI, 38 to 54), whereas the estimated 4 year survival, relapse-free and overall, was 25% (95% CI, 18 to 33) and 30% (95% CI, 23 to 38), respectively. In a multivariate analysis patients with del (5q) and a blast excess displayed poorer survival (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.93; P
  • Saraceni, Francesco; Labopin, Myriam; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Blaise, Didier; Tabrizi, Reza; Volin, Liisa; Cornelissen, Jan; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chevallier, Patrice; Craddock, Charles; Wu, Depei; Huynh, Anne; Arcese, William; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2016)
    Background: Optimal post-remission strategy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is matter of intense debate. Recent reports have shown stronger anti-leukemic activity but similar survival for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) from matched sibling donor compared to autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT); however, there is scarcity of literature confronting auto-HSCT with allo-HSCT from unrelated donor (UD-HSCT), especially mismatched UD-HSCT. Methods: We retrospectively compared outcome of allogeneic transplantation from matched (10/10 UD-HSCT) or mismatched at a single HLA-locus unrelated donor (9/10 UD-HSCT) to autologous transplantation in patients with AML in first complete remission (CR1). A total of 2879 patients were included; 1202 patients received auto-HSCT, 1302 10/10 UD-HSCT, and 375 9/10 UD-HSCT. A propensity score-weighted analysis was conducted to control for disease risk imbalances between the groups. Results: Matched 10/10 UD-HSCT was associated with the best leukemia-free survival (10/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.7, rho = 0.0016). Leukemia-free survival was not statistically different between auto-HSCT and 9/10 UD-HSCT (9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.8, rho = 0.2). Overall survival was similar across the groups (10/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.98, rho = 0.84; 9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 1.1, rho = 0.49). Notably, in intermediate-risk patients, OS was significantly worse for 9/10 UD-HSCT (9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 1.6, rho = 0.049), while it did not differ between auto-HSCT and 10/10 UD-HSCT (HR 0.95, rho = 0.88). In favorable risk patients, auto-HSCT resulted in 3-year LFS and OS rates of 59 and 78 %, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in AML patients in CR1 lacking an HLA-matched sibling donor, 10/10 UD-HSCT significantly improves LFS, but this advantage does not translate in better OS compared to auto-HSCT. In intermediate-risk patients lacking a fully HLA-matched donor, auto-HSCT should be considered as a valid option, as better survival appears to be provided by auto-HSCT compared to mismatched UD-HSCT. Finally, auto-HSCT provided an encouraging outcome in patients with favorable risk AML.
  • Canaani, Jonathan; Labopin, Myriam; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Blaise, Didier; Socie, Gerard; Forcade, Edouard; Maertens, Johan; Wu, Depei; Malladi, Ram; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Huynh, Anne; Bourhis, Jean Henri; Esteve, Jordi; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2019)
    Baseline cytogenetic studies at diagnosis remain the single most important determinant of outcome in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the prognostic role of the complete gamut of cytogenetic aberrations in AML patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is currently undefined. In addition, their significance in conjunction with FLT3-ITD status has not been addressed thus far. Using the ALWP/EBMT registry we conducted a retrospective analysis to determine the clinical outcomes of AML patients undergoing allo-HSCT with respect to specific recurring cytogenetic abnormalities complemented with FLT3-ITD status. We analyzed a cohort consisting of 8558 adult AML patients who underwent allo-HSCT from either a matched sibling or a matched unrelated donor. Patients with inv(3)(q21q26)/t(3;3)(q21;q26), del(5q), monosomy 7, chromosome 17p abnormalities, t(10;11)(p11-14;q13-23), t(6;11)(q27;q23), as well as those patients with a monosomal or complex karyotype experienced significantly inferior leukemia-free survival (LFS) compared to patients with a normal karyotype. Trisomy 14, del(9q), and loss of chromosome X were associated with improved LFS rates. A novel prognostic model delineating 5 distinct groups incorporating cytogenetic complexity and FLT3-ITD status was constructed with significant prognostic implications. Our analysis supports the added prognostic significance of FLT3-ITD to baseline cytogenetics in patients undergoing allo-HSCT.
  • Stukenborg, J. -B.; Alves-Lopes, J. P.; Kurek, M.; Albalushi, H.; Reda, A.; Keros, V.; Töhönen, V.; Bjarnason, R.; Romerius, P.; Sundin, M.; Nyström, U. Noren; Langenskiöld, C.; Vogt, H.; Henningsohn, L.; Mitchell, R. T.; Söder, O.; Petersen, C.; Jahnukainen, K. (2018)
    STUDY QUESTION: Does chemotherapy exposure (with or without alkylating agents) or primary diagnosis affect spermatogonial quantity in human prepubertal testicular tissue? SUMMARY ANSWER: Spermatogonial quantity is significantly reduced in testes of prepubertal boys treated with alkylating agent therapies or with hydroxyurea for sickle cell disease. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Cryopreservation of spermatogonial stem cells, followed by transplantation into the testis after treatment, is a proposed clinical option for fertility restoration in children. The key clinical consideration behind this approach is a sufficient quantity of healthy cryopreserved spermatogonia. However, since most boys with malignancies start therapy with agents that are not potentially sterilizing, they will have already received some chemotherapy before testicular tissue cryopreservation is considered. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: We examined histological sections of prepubertal testicular tissue to elucidate whether chemotherapy exposure or primary diagnosis affects spermatogonial quantity. Quantity of spermatogonia per transverse tubular cross-section (S/T) was assessed in relation to treatment characteristics and normative reference values in histological sections of paraffin embedded testicular tissue samples collected from 32 consecutive boy patients (aged 6.3 +/- 3.8 [mean +/- SD] years) between 2014 and 2017, as part of the NORDFERTIL study, and in 14 control samples (from boys aged 5.6 +/- 5.0 [mean +/- SD] years) from an internal biobank. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Prepubertal boys in Sweden, Finland and Iceland who were facing treatments associated with a very high risk of infertility, were offered the experimental procedure of testicular cryopreservation. Exclusion criteria were testicular volumes > 10 ml and high bleeding or infection risk. There were 18 patients with a diagnosis of malignancy and 14 patients a nonmalignant diagnosis. While 20 patients had the testicular biopsy performed 1-45 days after chemotherapy, 12 patients had not received any chemotherapy. In addition, 14 testicular tissue samples of patients with no reported testicular pathology, obtained from the internal biobank of the Department of Pathology at Karolinska University Hospital, were included as control samples in addition to reference values obtained from a recently published meta-analysis. The quantity of spermatogonia was assessed by both morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The main finding was a significant reduction in spermatogonial cell counts in boys treated with alkylating agents or with hydroxyurea for sickle cell disease. The mean S/T values in boys exposed to alkylating agents (0.2 +/- 0.3, n = 6) or in boys with sickle cell disease and exposed to hydroxyurea (0.3 +/- 0.6, n = 6) were significantly lower (P = 0.003 and P = 0.008, respectively) than in a group exposed to non-alkylating agents or in biobank control samples (1.7 +/- 1.0, n = 8 and 4.1 +/- 4.6, n = 14, respectively). The mean S/T values of the testicular tissue samples included in the biobank control group and the patient group exposed to nonalkylating agents were within recently published normative reference values. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Normal testicular tissue samples included in this study were obtained from the internal biobank of Karolinska University Hospital. Samples were considered normal and included in the study if no testicular pathology was reported in the analysed samples. However, detailed information regarding previous medical treatments and testicular volumes of patients included in this biobank were not available. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: This study summarizes, for the first time, spermatogonial quantity in a prepubertal patient cohort just before and after potentially sterilizing treatments. Boys facing cancer and cytotoxic therapies are regarded as the major group who will benefit from novel fertility preservation techniques. There are no previous reports correlating spermatogonial quantity to cumulative exposure to alkylating agents and anthracyclines (non-alkylating agents) and no information about the timing of cytotoxic exposures among this particular patient cohort. For prepubertal boys in whom fertility preservation is indicated, testicular tissue should be obtained before initiation of chemotherapy with alkylating agents, whilst for those with sickle cell disease and treated with hydroxyurea, this approach to fertility preservation may not be feasible. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): This study was supported by grants from The Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation (PR2016-0124; TJ2016-0093; PR2015-0073, TJ2015-0046) (J.-B.S. and K.J.), the Jane and Dan Olssons Foundation (2016-33) (J.-B.S.), the Finnish Cancer Society (K.J.), the Foundation for Paediatric Research (J.-B.S.), Kronprinsessan Lovisas Forening For Barnasjukvard/Stiftelsen Axel Tielmans Minnesfond, Samariten Foundation (J.-B.S.), the Vare Foundation for Paediatric Cancer Research (K.J.) and the Swedish Research Council (2012-6352) (O.S.). R.T.M. was supported by a Wellcome Trust Fellowship (09822). J.P.A.-L. and M.K. were supported by the ITN Marie Curie program 'Growsperm' (EU-FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN 603568). The authors declare no conflicts of interest.
  • Poire, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Polge, Emmanuelle; Volin, Liisa; Finke, Juergen; Ganser, Arnold; Blaise, Didier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Beelen, Dietrich; Forcade, Edouard; Lioure, Bruno; Socie, Gerard; Niederwieser, Dietger; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Maertens, Johan; Cornelissen, Jan; Craddock, Charles; Mohty, Mohamad; Esteve, Jordi; Nagler, Arnon (2020)
    Monosomy 7 or deletion 7q (-7/7q-) is the most frequent adverse cytogenetic features reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is a common indication for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, -7/7q- occurs frequently with other high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities such as complex karyotype (CK), monosomal karyotype (MK), monosomy 5 or deletion 5q (-5/5q-), 17p abnormalities (abn(17p)) or inversion of chromosome 3 (inv(3)), the presence of which may influence the outcomes after SCT. A total of 1109 patients were allocated to this study. Two-year probability of leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were 30% and 36%, respectively. Two-year probability of non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 20%. We defined five different cytogenetic subgroups: the "-7/7q- +/- CK group- designated group1," the "MK group-designated group 2," the "-5/5q- group- designated group 3," the "abn(17p) group- designated group 4" and the "inv(3) group- designated group 5." The 2-year probability of LFS in first remission was 48% for group 1, 36.4% for group 2, 28.4% for group 3, 19.1% for group 4 and 17.3% for group 5, respectively (P <.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed those significant differences across groups. Note, SCT in -7/7q- AML provides durable responses in one third of the patients. The presence of -7/7q- with or without CK in the absence of MK, abn(17p) or inv (3) is associated with a better survival after SCT. On the contrary, addition of MK, -5/5q-, abn(17p) or inv(3) identifies a sub-group of patients with poor prognosis even after SCT.