Browsing by Subject "WRIST"

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  • Chen, Bozhi; Bernard, Jonathan Y.; Padmapriya, Natarajan; Ning, Yilin; Cai, Shirong; Lanca, Carla; Tan, Kok Hian; Yap, Fabian; Chong, Yap-Seng; Shek, Lynette; Godfrey, Keith M.; Saw, Seang Mei; Chan, Shiao-Yng; Eriksson, Johan G.; Tan, Chuen Seng; Muller-Riemenschneider, Falk (2020)
    Background Screen viewing is a sedentary behaviour reported to interfere with sleep and physical activity. However, few longitudinal studies have assessed such associations in children of preschool age (0-6 years) and none have accounted for the compositional nature of these behaviours. We aimed to investigate the associations between total and device-specific screen viewing time at age 2-3 years and accelerometer-measured 24 h movement behaviours, including sleep, sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) at age 5.5 years. Methods The Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study is an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort study in Singapore, which began in June 2009. We recruited pregnant women during their first ultrasound scan visit at two major public maternity units in Singapore. At clinic visits done at age 2-3 years, we collected parent-reported information about children's daily total and device-specific screen viewing time (television, handheld devices, and computers). At 5.5 years, children's movement behaviours for 7 consecutive days were measured using wrist-worn accelerometers. We assessed the associations between screen viewing time and movement behaviours (sedentary behaviour, light physical activity, MVPA, and sleep) using Dirichlet regression, which accounts for the compositional nature of such behaviours. This study is active but not recruiting and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01174875. Findings Between June 1, 2009, and Oct 12, 2010, 1247 pregnant women enrolled and 1171 singleton births were enrolled. 987 children had parent-reported screen data at either 2 or 3 years, of whom 840 attended the clinic visit at age 5.5 years, and 577 wore an accelerometer. 552 children had at least 3 days of accelerometer data and were included in the analysis. Total screen viewing time at age 2-3 years had a significant negative association with sleep (p=0.008), light physical activity (p= 3 h screen viewing time]), and less light physical activity (384.6 vs 356.2 mins per day), and MVPA (76.2 vs 63.4 mins per day) at age 5.5 years. No significant differences in time spent sleeping were observed between the groups (539.5 vs 540.4 mins per day). Similar trends were observed for television viewing and handheld device viewing. Interpretation Longer screen viewing time in children aged 2-3 years was associated with more time spent engaged in sedentary behaviour and shorter time engaged in light physical activity and MVPA in later childhood. Our findings indicate that screen viewing might displace physical activity during early childhood, and suggest that reducing screen viewing time in early childhood might promote healthier behaviours and associated outcomes later in life. Copyright (C) 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Harju, Jarkko; Vehkaoja, Antti; Lindroos, Ville; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Liuhanen, Sasu; Yli-Hankala, Arvi; Oksala, Niku (2017)
    Alterations in arterial blood oxygen saturation, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) are strongly associated with intra-hospital cardiac arrests and resuscitations. A wireless, easy-to-use, and comfortable method for monitoring these important clinical signs would be highly useful. We investigated whether the Nellcor (TM) OxiMask MAX-FAST forehead sensor could provide data for vital sign measurements when located at the distal forearm instead of its intended location at the forehead to provide improved comfortability and easy placement. In a prospective setting, we recruited 30 patients undergoing surgery requiring postoperative care. At the postoperative care unit, patients were monitored for two hours using a standard patient monitor and with a study device equipped with a Nellcor (TM) Forehead SpO(2) sensor. The readings were electronically recorded and compared in post hoc analysis using Bland-Altman plots, Spearman's correlation, and root-mean-square error (RMSE). Bland-Altman plot showed that saturation (SpO(2)) differed by a mean of -0.2 % points (SD, 4.6), with a patient-weighted Spearman's correlation (r) of 0.142, and an RMSE of 4.2 points. For HR measurements, the mean difference was 0.6 bpm (SD, 2.5), r = 0.997, and RMSE = 1.8. For RR, the mean difference was -0.5 1/min (4.1), r = 0.586, and RMSE = 4.0. The SpO(2) readings showed a low mean difference, but also a low correlation and high RMSE, indicating that the Nellcor (TM) saturation sensor cannot reliably assess oxygen saturation at the forearm when compared to finger PPG measurements.
  • Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Barreira, Tiago V.; Schuna, John M.; Mire, Emily F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Fogelholm, Mikael; Hu, Gang; Kuriyan, Rebecca; Kurpad, Anura; Lambert, Estelle V.; Maher, Carol; Maia, Jose; Matsudo, Victor; Olds, Tim; Onywera, Vincent; Sarmiento, Olga L.; Standage, Martyn; Tremblay, Mark S.; Zhao, Pei; Church, Timothy S.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; ISCOLE Res Grp (2015)
    Background: We compared 24-hour waist-worn accelerometer wear time characteristics of 9-11 year old children in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE) to similarly aged U.S. children providing waking-hours waist-worn accelerometer data in the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods: Valid cases were defined as having >= 4 days with >= 10 hours of waking wear time in a 24-hour period, including one weekend day. Previously published algorithms for extracting total sleep episode time from 24-hour accelerometer data and for identifying wear time (in both the 24-hour and waking-hours protocols) were applied. The number of valid days obtained and a ratio (percent) of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer were computed for both ISCOLE and NHANES. Given the two surveys' discrepant sampling designs, wear time (minutes/day, hours/day) from U.S. ISCOLE was compared to NHANES using a meta-analytic approach. Wear time for the 11 additional countries participating in ISCOLE were graphically compared with NHANES. Results: 491 U.S. ISCOLE children (9.92 +/- 0.03 years of age [M +/- SE]) and 586 NHANES children (10.43 +/- 0.04 years of age) were deemed valid cases. The ratio of valid cases to the number of participants originally wearing an accelerometer was 76.7% in U.S. ISCOLE and 62.6% in NHANES. Wear time averaged 1357.0 +/- 4.2 minutes per 24-hour day in ISCOLE. Waking wear time was 884.4 +/- 2.2 minutes/day for U.S. ISCOLE children and 822.6 +/- 4.3 minutes/day in NHANES children (difference = 61.8 minutes/day, p <0.001). Wear time characteristics were consistently higher in all ISCOLE study sites compared to the NHANES protocol. Conclusions: A 24-hour waist-worn accelerometry protocol implemented in U.S. children produced 22.6 out of 24 hours of possible wear time, and 61.8 more minutes/day of waking wear time than a similarly implemented and processed waking wear time waist-worn accelerometry protocol. Consistent results were obtained internationally. The 24-hour protocol may produce an important increase in wear time compliance that also provides an opportunity to study the total sleep episode time separate and distinct from physical activity and sedentary time detected during waking-hours.