Browsing by Subject "YERSINIA-ENTEROCOLITICA"

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  • Elina, Felin; Outi, Hälli; Mari, Heinonen; Jukola, Elias; Maria, Fredriksson-Ahomaa (2019)
    Current macroscopic meat inspection cannot detect the most common pork-borne pathogens (Salmonella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica and Toxoplasma gondii). Furthermore, food chain information (FCI) may not provide sufficient data for visual-only inspection, which is supposed to be the common way of inspection of pigs in the European Union. Our observational study aimed to evaluate the serological monitoring and the clinical evaluation of on-farm health status of pigs and assess the feasibility of these data as part of the FCI in meat inspection. We studied the serological status of Salmonella spp., Yersinia spp. and T. gondii in pigs during the fattening period. Additionally, we evaluated the association between on-farm health status and meat inspection findings. On 57 indoor fattening pig farms in Finland, we collected blood samples (mean of 20 pigs/farm) and assessed the on-farm health (coughing, tail biting, lameness) at the end of the fattening period. We visited 34 of these farms also at the beginning of the fattening for sampling and on-farm health evaluation of the same pigs. Meat inspection results were obtained after slaughter for all 57 farms. Salmonella seroprevalence was low at the end of the fattening period: it was 17.6%, 10.6% or 1.9%, with the cut-off values of OD15% (recommended by the test manufacturer), OD20% (used by Danish monitoring programme) and OD40% (used by German monitoring programme), respectively. The overall seroprevalence of Salmonella spp. and Yersinia spp. increased significantly (P 
  • Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; London, Laura; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Kantala, Tuija; Laamanen, Ilona; Bistrom, Mia; Maunula, Leena; Gadd, Tuija (2020)
    The northern European wild boar population has increased during the last decade. Highest wild boar numbers in Finland have been reported in the southeastern part near the Russian border. Wild boars may be infected with several human and animal pathogens. In this study, we investigated the presence of important foodborne pathogens in wild boars hunted in 2016 in Finland using serology, PCR and culturing. Seroprevalence of Salmonella (38%) and Yersinia (56%) infections was high in wild boars. Antibodies to hepatitis E virus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella were found in 18%, 9% and 9% of the wild boars, respectively. Trichinella antibodies were detected in 1% of the animals. We recorded no differences in the seroprevalence between males and females. However, Yersinia and T. gondii antibodies were detected significantly more often in adults than in young individuals. Listeria monocytogenes (48%) and stx-positive Escherichia coli (33%) determinants were frequently detected in the visceral organs (spleen and kidneys) by PCR. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis O:1 and L. monocytogenes 2a and 4b were identified by culturing from the PCR-positive samples. Brucella suis biovar 2 was isolated from visceral organs. No African swine fever, classical swine fever or Aujeszky's disease were detected in the wild boars. Our study shows that wild boars are important reservoirs of foodborne pathogens.
  • Ho, Derek K.; Tissari, Jorma; Jarvinen, Hanna M.; Blom, Anna M.; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna (2011)
  • van Belkum, Alex; Almeida, Carina; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Barrass, Sarah V.; Butcher, Sarah J.; Çaykara, Tuğçe; Chowdhury, Sounak; Datar, Rucha; Eastwood, Ian; Goldman, Adrian; Goyal, Manisha; Izadi-Pruneyre, Nadia; Jacobsen, Theis; Johnson, Pirjo H.; Kempf, Volkhard A.J.; Kiessling, Andreas; Bueno, Juan Leva; Malik, Anchal; Malmström, Johan; Meuskens, Ina; Milner, Paul A.; Nilges, Michael; Pamme, Nicole; Peyman, Sally A.; Rodrigues, Ligia R.; Rodriguez-Mateos, Pablo; Sande, Maria G.; Silva, Carla Joana; Stehle, Thilo; Thibau, Arno; Vaca, Diana J.; Linke, Dirk (2021)
    Infectious diseases are an existential health threat, potentiated by emerging and re-emerging viruses and increasing bacterial antibiotic resistance. Targeted treatment of infectious diseases requires precision diagnostics, especially in cases where broad-range therapeutics such as antibiotics fail. There is thus an increasing need for new approaches to develop sensitive and specific in vitro diagnostic (IVD) tests. Basic science and translational research are needed to identify key microbial molecules as diagnostic targets, to identify relevant host counterparts, and to use this knowledge in developing or improving IVD. In this regard, an overlooked feature is the capacity of pathogens to adhere specifically to host cells and tissues. The molecular entities relevant for pathogen-surface interaction are the so-called adhesins. Adhesins vary from protein compounds to (poly-)saccharides or lipid structures that interact with eukaryotic host cell matrix molecules and receptors. Such interactions co-define the specificity and sensitivity of a diagnostic test. Currently, adhesin-receptor binding is typically used in the pre-analytical phase of IVD tests, focusing on pathogen enrichment. Further exploration of adhesin-ligand interaction, supported by present high-throughput "omics" technologies, might stimulate a new generation of broadly applicable pathogen detection and characterization tools. This review describes recent results of novel structure-defining technologies allowing for detailed molecular analysis of adhesins, their receptors and complexes. Since the host ligands evolve slowly, the corresponding adhesin interaction is under selective pressure to maintain a constant receptor binding domain. IVD should exploit such conserved binding sites and, in particular, use the human ligand to enrich the pathogen. We provide an inventory of methods based on adhesion factors and pathogen attachment mechanisms, which can also be of relevance to currently emerging pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19.
  • Weirich, Johanna; Braeutigam, Cornelia; Muehlenkamp, Melanie; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Meuskens, Ina; Skurnik, Mikael; Leskinen, Katarzyna; Bohn, Erwin; Autenrieth, Ingo; Schuetz, Monika (2017)
    The emergence of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria requires new therapies for combating bacterial infections. Targeting the biogenesis of virulence factors could be an alternative strategy instead of killing bacteria with antibiotics. The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria acts as a physical barrier. At the same time it facilitates the exchange of molecules and harbors a multitude of proteins associated with virulence. In order to insert proteins into the OM, an essential oligomeric membrane-associated protein complex, the ss-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) is required. Being essential for the biogenesis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) the BAM and also periplasmic chaperones may serve as attractive targets to develop novel antiinfective agents. Herein, we aimed to elucidate which proteins belonging to the OMP biogenesis machinery have the most important function in granting bacterial fitness, OM barrier function, facilitating biogenesis of dedicated virulence factors and determination of overall virulence. To this end we used the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica as a model system. We individually knocked out all non-essential components of the BAM (BamB, C and E) as well as the periplasmic chaperones DegP, SurA and Skp. In summary, we found that the most profound phenotypes were produced by the loss of BamB or SurA with both knockouts resulting in significant attenuation or even avirulence of Ye in a mouse infection model. Thus, we assume that both BamB and SurA are promising targets for the development of new antiinfective drugs in the future.
  • Thibau, Arno; Dichter, Alexander A.; Vaca, Diana J.; Linke, Dirk; Goldman, Adrian; Kempf, Volkhard A. J. (2020)
    The current problem of increasing antibiotic resistance and the resurgence of numerous infections indicate the need for novel vaccination strategies more than ever. In vaccine development, the search for and the selection of adequate vaccine antigens is the first important step. In recent years, bacterial outer membrane proteins have become of major interest, as they are the main proteins interacting with the extracellular environment. Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are important virulence factors in many Gram-negative bacteria, are localised on the bacterial surface, and mediate the first adherence to host cells in the course of infection. One example is the Neisseria adhesin A (NadA), which is currently used as a subunit in a licensed vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis. Other TAAs that seem promising vaccine candidates are the Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter (Ata), the Haemophilus influenzae adhesin (Hia), and TAAs of the genus Bartonella. Here, we review the suitability of various TAAs as vaccine candidates.
  • Tuomala, Henni; Verkola, Marie; Meller, Anna; Van der Auwera, Jasper; Patpatia, Sheetal; Järvinen, Asko; Skurnik, Mikael; Heikinheimo, Annamari; Kiljunen, Saija (2021)
    The increase of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) causes a threat to human health. LA-MRSA can be transmitted from animals to animal caretakers, which may further spread MRSA to communities and health care facilities. The objective of this work was to study the efficacy of phage treatment in the eradication of LA-MRSA from healthy carrier pigs. A total of 19 MRSA -positive weanling pigs were assigned to a test (n = 10) and a control group (n = 9). A phage cocktail containing three Staphylococcus phages, or a control buffer was administered to the nares and skin of the pigs three times every two days, after which the phage and MRSA levels in nasal and skin swab samples were monitored for a three-week period. The sensitivity of the strains isolated during the follow-up period to the phage cocktail and each phage individually was analyzed and the pig sera were tested for antibodies against the phages used in the cocktail. The phage treatment did not cause any side effects to the pigs. Phages were found in the skin and nasal samples on the days following the phage applications, but there was no reduction in the MRSA levels in the sampled animals. Phage-resistant strains or phage-specific antibodies were not detected during the experiment. The MRSA load in these healthy carrier animals was only 10–100 CFU/swab or nasal sample, which was likely below the replication threshold of phages. The effectiveness of phage treatment to eradicate MRSA from the pigs could thus not be (reliably) determined.
  • Laaksonen, Sauli; Oksanen, Antti; Julmi, Jerome; Zweifel, Claudio; Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria; Stephan, Roger (2017)
    Background: Various food-producing animals were recognized in recent years as healthy carriers of bacterial pathogens causing human illness. In northern Fennoscandia, the husbandry of semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) is a traditional livelihood and meat is the main product. This study determined the presence of selected foodborne pathogens, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthy semi-domesticated reindeer at slaughter in northern Finland and Norway. Results: All 470 reindeer fecal samples tested negative for Salmonella spp., whereas L. monocytogenes was detected in 3%, Yersinia spp. in 10%, and Shiga toxins genes (stx1 and/or stx2) in 33% of the samples. Listeria monocytogenes isolates belonged to the serotype 1/2a (14/15) and 4b, Yersinia spp. were identified mainly as Y. kristensenii (30/46) and Y. enterocolitica (8/46), and stx2 predominated among the Shiga toxin genes (stx2 alone or in combination with stx1 was found in 25% of the samples). With regard to the frequency and distribution of stx1/stx2, striking differences were evident among the 10 different areas of origin. Hence, reindeer could constitute a reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), but strain isolation and characterization is required for verification purposes and to assess the potential human pathogenicity of strains. On the other hand, the favorable antibiotic resistance profiles (only 5% of 95 E. coli isolates were resistant to one or more of the tested antibiotics) and the absence of MRSA and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (when applying selective methods) suggest only a limited risk of transmission to humans. Conclusions: Healthy semi-domesticated reindeer in northern Finland and Norway can be carriers of certain bacterial foodborne pathogens. Strict compliance with good hygiene practices during any step of slaughter (in particular during dehiding and evisceration) is therefore of central importance to avoid carcass contamination and to prevent foodborne pathogens from entering the food chain.
  • Elovaara, Heli; Huusko, Teija; Maksimow, Mikael; Elima, Kati; Yegutkin, Gennady G.; Skurnik, Mikael; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Siitonen, Anja; McPherson, Michael J.; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa (2015)
    Escherichia coli amine oxidase (ECAO), encoded by the tynA gene, catalyzes the oxidative deamination of aromatic amines into aldehydes through a well-established mechanism, but its exact biological role is unknown. We investigated the role of ECAO by screening environmental and human isolates for tynA and characterizing a tynA-deletion strain using microarray analysis and biochemical studies. The presence of tynA did not correlate with pathogenicity. In tynA+ Escherichia coli strains, ECAO enabled bacterial growth in phenylethylamine, and the resultant H2O2 was released into the growth medium. Some aminoglycoside antibiotics inhibited the enzymatic activity of ECAO, which could affect the growth of tynA+ bacteria. Our results suggest that tynA is a reserve gene used under stringent environmental conditions in which ECAO may, due to its production of H2O2, provide a growth advantage over other bacteria that are unable to manage high levels of this oxidant. In addition, ECAO, which resembles the human homolog hAOC3, is able to process an unknown substrate on human leukocytes.
  • Kiessling, Andreas R.; Malik, Anchal; Goldman, Adrian (2020)
    Adhesion is the initial step in the infection process of gram-negative bacteria. It is usually followed by the formation of biofilms that serve as a hub for further spread of the infection. Type V secretion systems engage in this process by binding to components of the extracellular matrix, which is the first step in the infection process. At the same time they provide protection from the immune system by either binding components of the innate immune system or by establishing a physical layer against aggressors. Trimeric autotransporter adhesins (TAAs) are of particular interest in this family of proteins as they possess a unique structural composition which arises from constraints during translocation. The sequence of individual domains can vary dramatically while the overall structure can be very similar to one another. This patchwork approach allows researchers to draw conclusions of the underlying function of a specific domain in a structure-based approach which underscores the importance of solving structures of yet uncharacterized TAAs and their individual domains to estimate the full extent of functions of the protein a priori. Here, we describe recent advances in understanding the translocation process of TAAs and give an overview of structural motifs that are unique to this class of proteins. The role of BpaC in the infection process of Burkholderia pseudomallei is highlighted as an exceptional example of a TAA being at the centre of infection initiation.
  • Filik, Karolina; Szermer-Olearnik, Bozena; Wernecki, Maciej; Happonen, Lotta J.; Pajunen, Maria I.; Nawaz, Ayesha; Qasim, Muhammad Suleman; Jun, Jin Woo; Mattinen, Laura; Skurnik, Mikael; Brzozowska, Ewa (2020)
    We report here the complete genome sequence and characterization ofYersiniabacteriophage vB_YenP_phi 80-18. phi 80-18 was isolated in 1991 using aY. enterocoliticaserotype O:8 strain 8081 as a host from a sewage sample in Turku, Finland, and based on its morphological and genomic features is classified as a podovirus. The genome is 42 kb in size and has 325 bp direct terminal repeats characteristic for podoviruses. The genome contains 57 predicted genes, all encoded in the forward strand, of which 29 showed no similarity to any known genes. Phage particle proteome analysis identified altogether 24 phage particle-associated proteins (PPAPs) including those identified as structural proteins such as major capsid, scaffolding and tail component proteins. In addition, also the DNA helicase, DNA ligase, DNA polymerase, 5 '-exonuclease, and the lytic glycosylase proteins were identified as PPAPs, suggesting that they might be injected together with the phage genome into the host cell to facilitate the take-over of the host metabolism. The phage-encoded RNA-polymerase and DNA-primase were not among the PPAPs. Promoter search predicted the presence of four phage and eleven host RNA polymerase -specific promoters in the genome, suggesting that early transcription of the phage is host RNA-polymerase dependent and that the phage RNA polymerase takes over later. The phage tolerates pH values between 2 and 12, and is stable at 50 degrees C but is inactivated at 60 degrees C. It grows slowly with a 50 min latent period and has apparently a low burst size. Electron microscopy revealed that the phage has a head diameter of about 60 nm, and a short tail of 20 nm. Whole-genome phylogenetic analysis confirmed that phi 80-18 belongs to theAutographivirinaesubfamily of thePodoviridaefamily, that it is 93.2% identical toYersiniaphage fHe-Yen3-01. Host range analysis showed that phi 80-18 can infect in addition toY. enterocoliticaserotype O:8 strains also strains of serotypes O:4, O:4,32, O:20 and O:21, the latter ones representing similar toY. enterocoliticaserotype O:8, the American pathogenic biotype 1B strains. In conclusion, the phage phi 80-18 is a promising candidate for the biocontrol of the American biotype 1BY. enterocolitica.
  • Fredriksson-Ahomaa, Maria (2019)
    Wild boar populations around the world have increased dramatically over past decades. Climate change, generating milder winters with less snow, may affect their spread into northern regions. Wild boars can serve as reservoirs for a number of bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which are transmissible to humans and domestic animals through direct interaction with wild boars, through contaminated food or indirectly through contaminated environment. Disease transmission between wild boars, domestic animals, and humans is an increasing threat to human and animal health, especially in areas with high wild boar densities. This article reviews important foodborne zoonoses, including bacterial diseases (brucellosis, salmonellosis, tuberculosis, and yersiniosis), parasitic diseases (toxoplasmosis and trichinellosis), and the viral hepatitis E. The focus is on the prevalence of these diseases and the causative microbes in wild boars. The role of wild boars in transmitting these pathogens to humans and livestock is also briefly discussed.