Browsing by Subject "YOUNG-CHILDREN"

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  • Stahlmann, Katharina; Hebestreit, Antje; DeHenauw, Stefaan; Hunsberger, Monica; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lissner, Lauren; Molnar, Denes; Ayala-Marin, Aleli M.; Reisch, Lucia A.; Russo, Paola; Tornaritis, Michael; Veidebaum, Toomas; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Bogl, Leonie H. (2020)
    Background There has been an increase in children growing up in non-traditional families, such as single-parent and blended families. Children from such families have a higher prevalence of obesity and poorer health outcomes, but research on the relationship with obesogenic behaviours is limited. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether there are associations between family structures and obesogenic behaviours and related family rules in European children and adolescents. Methods The sample included 7664 children (mean age +/- SD: 10.9 +/- 2.9) from 4923 families who were participants of the multi-centre I.Family study (2013/2014) conducted in 8 European countries. Family structure was assessed by a detailed interview on kinship and household. Obesogenic behaviours (screen time, sleep duration, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)) and family rules (rules for computer and television, bedtime routine, availability of SSBs during meals) were determined by standardized questionnaires. Multilevel mixed-effects linear and logistic regression models were used to model the associations of family structure with obesogenic behaviours and family rules. Sex, age, parental education level, number of children and adults in the household and BMI z-score were covariates in the models. Two-parent biological families were set as the reference category. Results Children from single-parent families were less likely to have family rules regarding screen time (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40-0.94, p = 0.026) with higher reported hours of screen time per week (beta = 2.70 h/week, 95% CI: 1.39-4.00, p <0.001). The frequency of weekly SSB consumption differed by family structure in a sex-specific manner: girls from single-parent (beta = 3.19 frequency/week, 95% CI: 0.91-5.47, p = 0.006) and boys from blended/adoptive families (beta = 3.01 frequency/week, 95% CI: 0.99-5.03, p = 0.004) consumed more SSBs. Sleep duration, bedtime routines and availability of SSBs during meals did not differ between children from these family structures. Parental education did not modify any of these associations. Conclusions Parents in non-traditional family structures appear to experience more difficulties in restricting screen time and the intake of SSBs in their children than parents in traditional two-parent family structures. Our findings therefore suggest that additional support and effective strategies for parents in non-traditional families may help to reduce obesogenic behaviours in children from such family types.
  • Syrjälä, Essi; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Peltonen, Jaakko; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Hakola, Leena; Åkerlund, Mari; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Toppari, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M. (2019)
    Several dietary factors have been suspected to play a role in the development of advanced islet autoimmunity (IA) and/or type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the evidence is fragmentary. A prospective population-based cohort of 6081 Finnish newborn infants with HLA-DQB1-conferred susceptibility to T1D was followed up to 15 years of age. Diabetes-associated autoantibodies and diet were assessed at 3-to 12-month intervals. We aimed to study the association between consumption of selected foods and the development of advanced IA longitudinally with Cox regression models (CRM), basic joint models (JM) and joint latent class mixed models (JLCMM). The associations of these foods to T1D risk were also studied to investigate consistency between alternative endpoints. The JM showed a marginal association between meat consumption and advanced IA: the hazard ratio adjusted for selected confounding factors was 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.12). The JLCMM identified two classes in the consumption trajectories of fish and a marginal protective association for high consumers compared to low consumers: the adjusted hazard ratio was 0.68 (0.44, 1.05). Similar findings were obtained for T1D risk with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.13 (1.02, 1.24) for meat and 0.45 (0.23, 0.86) for fish consumption. Estimates from the CRMs were closer to unity and CIs were narrower compared to the JMs. Findings indicate that intake of meat might be directly and fish inversely associated with the development of advanced IA and T1D, and that disease hazards in longitudinal nutritional epidemiology are more appropriately modeled by joint models than with naive approaches.
  • Ahlberg, Sara; Grace, Delia; Kiarie, Gideon; Kirino, Yumi; Lindahl, Johanna (2018)
    Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1), a human carcinogen, is found in milk products and may have potentially severe health impacts on milk consumers. We assessed the risk of cancer and stunting as a result of AFM1 consumption in Nairobi, Kenya, using worst case assumptions of toxicity and data from previous studies. Almost all (99.5%) milk was contaminated with AFM1. Cancer risk caused by AFM1 was lower among consumers purchasing from formal markets (0.003 cases per 100,000) than for low-income consumers (0.006 cases per 100,000) purchasing from informal markets. Overall cancer risk (0.004 cases per 100,000) from AFM1 alone was low. Stunting is multifactorial, but assuming only AFM1 consumption was the determinant, consumption of milk contaminated with AFM1 levels found in this study could contribute to 2.1% of children below three years in middle-income families, and 2.4% in low-income families, being stunted. Overall, 2.7% of children could hypothetically be stunted due to AFM1 exposure from milk. Based on our results AFM1 levels found in milk could contribute to an average of −0.340 height for age z-score reduction in growth. The exposure to AFM1 from milk is 46 ng/day on average, but children bear higher exposure of 3.5 ng/kg bodyweight (bw)/day compared to adults, at 0.8 ng/kg bw/day. Our paper shows that concern over aflatoxins in milk in Nairobi is disproportionate if only risk of cancer is considered, but that the effect on stunting children might be much more significant from a public health perspective; however, there is still insufficient data on the health effects of AFM1.
  • Larson, Eric D.; Magno, Jose Pedrito M.; Steritz, Matthew J.; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo d; Cardwell, Jonathan; Pedro, Melquiadesa; Roberts, Tori Bootpetch; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Rosanes, Rose Anne Q.; Greenlee, Christopher; Santos, Rachel Ann P.; Yousaf, Ayesha; Streubel, Sven-Olrik; Santos, Aileen Trinidad R.; Ruiz, Amanda G.; Mae Lagrana-Villagracia, Sheryl; Ray, Dylan; Yarza, Talitha Karisse L.; Scholes, Melissa A.; Anderson, Catherine B.; Acharya, Anushree; Gubbels, Samuel P.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Cass, Stephen P.; Lee, Nanette R.; Shaikh, Rehan S.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Prager, Jeremy D.; Cruz, Teresa Luisa G.; Yoon, Patricia J.; Abes, Generoso T.; Schwartz, David A.; Chan, Abner L.; Wine, Todd M.; Maria Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva; Friedman, Norman; Kechris, Katerina; Kere, Juha; Leal, Suzanne M.; Yang, Ivana; Patel, Janak A.; Tantoco, Ma Leah C.; Riazuddin, Saima; Chan, Kenny H.; Mattila, Petri S.; Reyes-Quintos, Maria Rina T.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Jenkins, Herman A.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Hafren, Lena; Chiong, Charlotte M.; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P. (2019)
    A genetic basis for otitis media is established, however, the role of rare variants in disease etiology is largely unknown. Previously a duplication variant within A2ML1 was identified as a significant risk factor for otitis media in an indigenous Filipino population and in US children. In this report exome and Sanger sequencing was performed using DNA samples from the indigenous Filipino population, Filipino cochlear implantees, US probands, Finnish, and Pakistani families with otitis media. Sixteen novel, damaging A2ML1 variants identified in otitis media patients were rare or low-frequency in population-matched controls. In the indigenous population, both gingivitis and A2ML1 variants including the known duplication variant and the novel splice variant c.4061 + 1 G>C were independently associated with otitis media. Sequencing of salivary RNA samples from indigenous Filipinos demonstrated lower A2ML1 expression according to the carriage of A2ML1 variants. Sequencing of additional salivary RNA samples from US patients with otitis media revealed differentially expressed genes that are highly correlated with A2ML1 expression levels. In particular, RND3 is upregulated in both A2ML1 variant carriers and high-A2ML1 expressors. These findings support a role for A2ML1 in keratinocyte differentiation within the middle ear as part of otitis media pathology and the potential application of ROCK inhibition in otitis media.
  • Diabimmune Study Grp; Seppälä, Elina M.; Oikarinen, Sami; Lehtonen, Jussi P.; Neupane, Subas; Honkanen, Hanna; Tyni, Iiris; Siljander, Heli; Ilonen, Jorma; Sillanpää, Saara; Laranne, Jussi; Knip, Mikael; Hyöty, Heikki (2020)
    Background. Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), human enteroviruses (HEVs) and human parechoviruses (HPeVs) have been linked to acute otitis media (AOM). We evaluated this association in a prospective birth cohort setting. Methods. A total of 324 healthy infants were followed up from birth to age 3 years. Nasal swab samples were collected at age 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months and screened for HRV and HEV using real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Stool samples were collected monthly and analyzed for HRV, HEV, and HPeV. AOM episodes diagnosed by physicians were reported by parents in a diary. The association of viruses with AOM was analyzed using generalized estimation equations, and their relative contributions using population-attributable risk percentages. Results. A clear association was found between AOM episodes and simultaneous detection of HEV (adjusted odds ratio for the detection of virus in stools, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-3.91) and HRV (1.54; 1.04-2.30). HPeV showed a similar, yet nonsignificant trend (adjusted odds ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, .81-2.56). HRV and HEV showed higher population-attributable risk percentages (25% and 20%) than HPeV (11%). Conclusions. HEVs and HRVs may contribute to the development of AOM in a relatively large proportion of cases.
  • Pollanen, Petra M.; Lempainen, Johanna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Vahasalo, Paula; Ilonen, Jorma; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael (2017)
    Aims/hypothesis In this study, we aimed to characterise rapid progressors to type 1 diabetes among children recruited from the general population, on the basis of HLA-conferred disease susceptibility. Methods We monitored 7410 HLA-predisposed children participating in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study for the development of beta cell autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes from birth over a median follow-up time of 16.2 years (range 0.9-21.1 years). Islet cell antibodies (ICA) and autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA) and islet antigen 2 (IA-2A) were assessed as markers of beta cell autoimmunity. Rapid progression was defined as progression to clinical type 1 diabetes within 1.5 years of autoantibody seroconversion. We analysed the association between rapid progression and demographic and autoantibody characteristics as well as genetic markers, including 25 non-HLA SNPs predisposing to type 1 diabetes. Results Altogether, 1550 children (21%) tested positive for at least one diabetes-associated autoantibody in at least two samples, and 248 (16%) of seroconverters progressed to type 1 diabetes by the end of 2015. The median time from seroconversion to diagnosis was 0.51 years in rapid progressors (n = 42, 17%) and 5.4 years in slower progressors. Rapid progression was observed both among young (<5 years) and early pubertal children (> 7 years), resulting in a double-peak distribution of seroconversion age. Compared with slower progressors, rapid progressors had a higher frequency of positivity for multiple (>= 2) autoantibodies and had higher titres of ICA, IAA and IA-2A at seroconversion, and there was a higher prevalence of the secretor genotype in the FUT2 gene among those carrying the high-risk HLA genotype. Compared with autoantibody-positive non-progressors, rapid progressors were younger, were more likely to carry the high-risk HLA genotype and a predisposing SNP in the PTPN22 gene, had higher frequency of ICA, IAA, GADA and IA-2A positivity and multipositivity, and had higher titres of all four autoantibodies at seroconversion. Conclusions/interpretation At seroconversion, individuals with rapid progression to type 1 diabetes were characterised by a younger age, higher autoantibody titres, positivity for multiple autoantibodies and higher prevalence of a FUT2 SNP. The double-peak profile for seroconversion age among the rapid progressors demonstrates for the first time that rapid progression may take place not only in young children but also in children in early puberty. Rapid progressors might benefit from careful clinical follow-up and early preventive measures.
  • Pöllänen, Petra M.; Lempainen, Johanna; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael (2019)
    Context: Characterization of slow progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D) may reveal novel means for prevention of T1D. Slow progressors might carry natural immunomodulators that delay beta-cell destruction and mediate preservation of beta-cell function. Objective: To identify demographic, genetic, and immunological characteristics of slow progression from seroconversion to clinical T1D. Design: H LA-susceptible children (n = 7410) were observed from birth for islet cell antibody (ICA), insulin autoantibody (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), and islet antigen-2 autoantibodies (IA-2A), and for clinical T1D. Disease progression that lasted >= 7.26 years (slowest) quartile from initial seroconversion to diagnosis was considered slow. Autoantibody and genetic characteristics including 45 non-HLA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predisposing to T1D were analyzed. Results: By the end of 2015, 1528 children (21 %) had tested autoantibody positive and 247 (16%) had progressed to T1D. The median delay from seroconversion to diagnosis was 8.7 years in slow (n = 62, 25%) and 3.0 years in other progressors. Compared with other progressors, slow progressors were less often multipositive, had lower ICA and IAA titers, and lower frequency of IA-2A at seroconversion. Slow progressors were born more frequently in the fall, whereas other progressors were born more often in the spring. Compared with multipositive nonprogressors, slow progressors were younger, had higher ICA titers, and higher frequency of IAA and multiple autoantibodies at seroconversion. We found no differences in the distributions of non-HLA SNPs between progressors. Conclusions: We observed differences in autoantibody characteristics and the season of birth among progressors, but no characteristics present at seroconversion that were specifically predictive for slow progression.
  • Yeo, L.; Pujol-Autonell, I.; Baptista, R.; Eichmann, M.; Kronenberg-Versteeg, D.; Heck, S.; Dolton, G.; Sewell, A. K.; Härkönen, T.; Mikk, M. -L.; Toppari, J.; Veijola, R.; Knip, M.; Ilonen, J.; Peakman, M. (2020)
    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), autoreactive cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are implicated in the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells. The HLA-B*3906 and HLA-A*2402 class I genes confer increased risk and promote early disease onset, suggesting that CD8(+) T cells that recognize peptides presented by these class I molecules on pancreatic beta cells play a pivotal role in the autoimmune response. We examined the frequency and phenotype of circulating preproinsulin (PPI)-specific and insulin B (InsB)-specific CD8(+) T cells in HLA-B*3906(+) children newly diagnosed with T1D and in high-risk HLA-A*2402(+) children before the appearance of disease-specific autoantibodies and before diagnosis of T1D. Antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected using human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I tetramers and flow cytometry was used to assess memory status. In HLA-B*3906(+) children with T1D, we observed an increase in PPI5-12-specific transitional memory CD8(+) T cells compared to non-diabetic, age- and HLA-matched subjects. Furthermore, PPI5-12-specific CD8(+) T cells in HLA-B*3906(+) children with T1D showed a significantly more antigen-experienced phenotype compared to polyclonal CD8(+) T cells. In longitudinal samples from high-risk HLA-A*2402(+) children, the percentage of terminal effector cells within the InsB(15-24)-specific CD8(+) T cells was increased before diagnosis relative to samples taken before the appearance of autoantibodies. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to report HLA-B*3906-restricted autoreactive CD8(+) T cells in T1D. Collectively, our results provide evidence that beta cell-reactive CD8(+) T cells restricted by disease-associated HLA class I molecules display an antigen-experienced phenotype and acquire enhanced effector function during the period leading to clinical diagnosis, implicating these cells in driving disease.
  • Heikkinen, T.; Silvennoinen, H.; Heinonen, S.; Vuorinen, T. (2016)
    Some studies have assessed the efficacy of influenza vaccination in children separately for moderate-to-severe and any influenza, but the definition used for identifying children with moderate-to-severe illness has not been validated. We analyzed clinical and socioeconomic data from two prospective cohort studies of respiratory infections among children aged
  • Turunen, Katri; Antikainen, Jenni; Lääveri, Tinja; Kirveskari, Juha; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Kantele, Anu (2020)
    Background: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major pathogen causing travellers' diarrhoea (TD) among visitors to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). Scant data are available on rates of travel-acquired ETEC producing heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) toxin or its subtypes, STh (human) and STp (porcine) in various geographic regions, and on clinical pictures associated with each toxin. Methods: Using qPCR, we analysed LT, STh, and STp in stools positive for ETEC in a prospective study among 103 Finnish travellers visiting LMIC. They filled in questionnaires and provided stool samples before and after travel. We scrutinized geographic distribution of LT, STh, and STp ETEC findings, and association between these different ETEC subtypes and moderate/severe TD. Results: Among the 103 stool samples positive for ETEC toxins, the rate for LT was 76%, for STh 26%, and STp 41%. The rate for LT-only was 44%, for 5Th-only 6%, STp-only 16%, LT + STh 10%, LT + STp 15%, STh + STp 3%, and LT + STh + STp 8%. Findings varied by destination; the rates of LT, STh, and STp were 79%, 21%, and 57%, respectively, in Southern Asia (n = 14); 85%, 10%, and 20% in South-eastern Asia (n = 20); 84%, 13%, and 29% in Eastern Africa (n = 31); and 56%, 50%, and 63% in Western Africa (n = 32), respectively. Of travellers positive for LT, STh, and STp, 83%, 100%, and 88%, encountered TD; 35%, 55%, and 41% reported moderate/severe TD. STh was associated with moderate/severe TD. Conclusions: Toxin findings varied by destination; multiple toxins were commonly detected. Moderate/severe TD was reported most frequently by subjects with STh-ETEC.
  • Koivusaari, Katariina; Syrjälä, Essi; Niinistö, Sari; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Ahonen, Suvi; Åkerlund, Mari; Korhonen, Tuuli E.; Toppari, Jorma; Ilonen, Jorma; Peltonen, Jaakko; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Knip, Mikael; Alatossava, Tapani; Veijola, Riitta; Virtanen, Suvi M (2020)
    Several prospective studies have shown an association between cows’ milk consumption and the risk of islet autoimmunity and/or type 1 diabetes. We wanted to study whether processing of milk plays a role. A population-based birth cohort of 6081 children with HLA-DQB1-conferred risk to type 1 diabetes was followed until the age of 15 years. We included 5545 children in the analyses. Food records were completed at the ages of 3 and 6 months and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 years, and diabetes-associated autoantibodies were measured at 3–12-month intervals. For milk products in the food composition database, we used conventional and processing-based classifications. We analysed the data using a joint model for longitudinal and time-to-event data. By the age of 6 years, islet autoimmunity developed in 246 children. Consumption of all cows’ milk products together (energy-adjusted hazard ratio 1·06; 95 % CI 1·02, 1·11; P = 0·003), non-fermented milk products (1·06; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·10; P = 0·011) and fermented milk products (1·35; 95 % CI 1·10, 1·67; P = 0·005) was associated with an increased risk of islet autoimmunity. The early milk consumption was not associated with the risk beyond 6 years. We observed no clear differences based on milk homogenisation and heat treatment. Our results are consistent with the previous studies, which indicate that high milk consumption may cause islet autoimmunity in children at increased genetic risk. The study did not identify any specific type of milk processing that would clearly stand out as a sole risk factor apart from other milk products.
  • Vandenbroucke, Loren; Verschueren, Karine; Desoete, Annemie; Aunio, Pirjo; Ghesquiere, Pol; Baeyens, Dieter (2018)
    Working memory is important for a variety of life domains,. including for children's school functioning. As such, it is crucial to understand its development, antecedents and consequences. The current study investigates the development of different working memory components (phonological loop, visuospatial sketchpad, central executive), the influence of different aspects of the teacher-student relationship (closeness, conflict, dependency) and its predictive value for academic achievement (reading, spelling, mathematics) across the transition from kindergarten to first grade. The sample consisted of 107 kindergarten children. Working memory tasks were administered at the end of kindergarten and first grade. Teachers reported on teacher-student relationship quality in the middle of first grade. Standardized tests were used to assess academic achievement at the end of first grade. Results indicate moderate to large increases in the phonological loop and visuospatial sketchpad and large gains in the central executive. Dependency of the student towards the teacher significantly predicted visuospatial sketchpad performance at the end of first grade. Reading was significantly predicted by the visuospatial sketchpad and phonological loop in kindergarten, while for spelling the visuospatial sketchpad was important. Finally, mathematics was predicted by performance on the phonological loop and the visuospatial sketchpad. The current study indicates the importance of the affective quality of the teacher-student relationship for working memory performance, which in turn is important for academic achievement. It is therefore critical to attend to the early detection and prevention or intervention of working memory problems in the classroom in order to prevent future academic problems. Additionally, maintaining a positive relationship with students and encouraging their independent exploration may be important when preventing such problems, complementary to cognitive or other types of training and intervention.
  • Poyhonen, Heidi; Nurmi, Mirka; Peltola, Ville; Alaluusua, Satu; Ruuskanen, Olli; Lahdesmaki, Tuire (2017)
    Background: The use of doxycycline has been avoided before 8 years of age due to known dental staining caused by tetracyclines, although doxycycline differs from classical tetracyclines in many ways. Doxycycline is still an important antimicrobial agent, but its dental safety is not well studied. Objectives: To examine the state of permanent teeth after doxycycline exposure in children,8 years of age. Methods: Details of doxycycline treatment were collected from medical records. After the eruption of permanent teeth the dental status was examined by an experienced paediatric dentist for detection of dental staining and enamel hypoplasia. The resulting dental photographs were evaluated by a second independent experienced paediatric dentist. Results: The mean age of 38 study subjects at the time of doxycycline treatment was 4.7 years (range 0.6-7.9 years, SD 2.3). The doxycycline dose was 10 mg/kg/day (varying from 8 to 10 mg/kg/day) for the first 2-3 days and 5mg/kg/day (varying from 2.5 to 10mg/kg/day) thereafter. The mean length of the treatment was 12.5days (SD 6.0) and ranged from 2 to 28 days. Tetracycline-like staining or enamel hypoplasia of developing teeth was detected in none of the subjects. Conclusions: Doxycycline treatment of small children does not seem to induce permanent tooth staining.
  • Törmänen, Minna; Roebers, Claudia M. (2018)
    This longitudinal study investigates the differences in cognitive and socio-emotional development and academic achievement between children educated in special education classes (N = 37) and regular classes (N = 37). The study is retrospective. The first measurement point was while children were attending play-oriented kindergarten and no decision about their education had yet been made. The second measurement point followed after 2 years of schooling. Comparing carefully matched groups, no differences in executive functions (EFs) were found before beginning school. Children assigned to special education had poorer language, fine motor skills and a lower pre-academic self-concept, self-regulatory skills and social integration. Notably, every fourth child in special education was an immigrant, 9% of whom later attended regular classes. After 2 years of schooling in either setting, the groups differed significantly in academic achievement, EFs, fine motor skills and cognitive self-regulatory skills. However, it was not - as school officials had intended - that children in special education classes had caught up, except in regard to their academic self-concept and social integration.
  • Cavonius-Rintahaka, Diana; Aho, Anna Liisa; Billstedt, Eva; Gillberg, Christopher (2021)
    Aim: To describe the development and implementation of a Dialogical Family Guidance (DFG) intervention, aimed at families with a child with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). Design: The DFG components are presented and the content of a DFG training course. Professionals' experiences after the DFG training were evaluated. Methods: Dialogical Family Guidance development phases and implementation process are examined. The Revised Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence checklist (SQUIRE 2.0) was used to provide a framework for reporting new knowledge. Results: The DFG training course seemed to increase possibilities of a more independent role as a nurse to deliver the DFG family intervention. The project showed that the use of dialogue can be difficult for some professionals. Analysis of the questionnaire completed after DFG training reported a high level of satisfaction. DFG training offered a new approach to deliver knowledge and understanding to families using dialogue, including tailored psychoeducation and emotional and practical guidance.
  • Pöllänen, Petra M.; Ryhänen, Samppa J.; Toppari, Jorma; Ilonen, Jorma; Vähäsalo, Paula; Veijola, Riitta; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael (2020)
    Context: We set out to characterize the dynamics of islet autoantibodies over the first 15 years of life in children carrying genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). We also assessed systematically the role of zinc transporter 8 autoantibodies (ZnT8A) in this context. Design: HLA-predisposed children (N = 1006, 53.0% boys) recruited from the general population during 1994 to 1997 were observed from birth over a median time of 14.9 years (range, 1.9-15.5 years) for ZnT8A, islet cell (ICA), insulin (IAA), glutamate decarboxylase (GADA), and islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) antibodies, and for T1D. Results: By age 15.5 years, 35 (3.5%) children had progressed to T1D. Islet autoimmunity developed in 275 (27.3%) children at a median age of 7.4 years (range, 0.3-15.1 years). The ICA seroconversion rate increased toward puberty, but the biochemically defined autoantibodies peaked at a young age. Before age 2 years, ZnT8A and IAA appeared commonly as the first autoantibody, but in the preschool years IA-2A- and especially GADA-initiated autoimmunity increased. Thereafter, GADA-positive seroconversions continued to appear steadily until ages 10 to 15 years. Inverse IAA seroconversions occurred frequently (49.3% turned negative) and marked a prolonged delay from seroconversion to diagnosis compared to persistent IAA (8.2 vs 3.4 years; P = .01). Conclusions: In HLA-predisposed children, the primary autoantibody is characteristic of age and might reflect the events driving the disease process toward clinical T1D. Autoantibody persistence affects the risk of T1D. These findings provide a framework for identifying disease subpopulations and for personalizing the efforts to predict and prevent T1D.
  • Korpela, Katri; de Vos, Willem M. (2018)
    Microbes colonising the infant intestine, especially bacteria, are considered important for metabolic and immunological programming in early life, potentially affecting the susceptibility of the host to disease. We combined published data to provide a global view of microbiota development in early life. The results support the concept that the microbiota develops with age in an orchestrated manner, showing common patterns across populations. Furthermore, infants are colonised at birth by specific, selected maternal faecal bacteria and likely their bacteriophages. Therefore, infants are adapted to receiving specific bacterial signals, partly derived from the maternal microbiota, at successive immunological time windows during early development. Birth by caesarean section compromises the initial vertical transmission of microbes whereas antibiotic use shifts the microbiota away from the normal developmental pattern. These disruptions alter the microbial signals that the host receives, potentially affecting child development.
  • Knip, Mikael; Luopajarvi, Kristiina; Harkonen, Taina (2017)
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is perceived as a chronic immune-mediated disease with a subclinical prodromal period characterized by selective loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets in genetically susceptible subjects. The incidence of T1D has increased manifold in most developed countries after World War II in parallel with a series of other immune-mediated diseases. T1D results from gene-environmental interactions. The appearance of disease-associated autoantibodies into the peripheral circulation is the first detectable sign of the initiation of the disease process leading to clinical T1D. The first autoantibodies may appear already before the age of 6 months and the seroconversion rate peaks during the second year of life. This implies that exogenous factors involved in the pathogenesis of T1D must be operative in early life, some of them most likely already during pregnancy. Here, we discuss putative endogenous factors that may contribute to the development of T1D during fetal and early postnatal life. Many environmental factors operative in early life have been implicated in the pathogenesis of T1D, but relatively few have been firmly confirmed.
  • Shaw, Vanessa; Polderman, Nonnie; Renken-Terhaerdt, Jose; Paglialonga, Fabio; Oosterveld, Michiel; Tuokkola, Jetta; Anderson, Caroline; Desloovere, An; Greenbaum, Laurence; Haffner, Dieter; Nelms, Christina; Qizalbash, Leila; Vande Walle, Johan; Warady, Bradley; Shroff, Rukshana; Rees, Lesley (2020)
    Dietary management in pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an area fraught with uncertainties and wide variations in practice. Even in tertiary pediatric nephrology centers, expert dietetic input is often lacking. The Pediatric Renal Nutrition Taskforce (PRNT), an international team of pediatric renal dietitians and pediatric nephrologists, was established to develop clinical practice recommendations (CPRs) to address these challenges and to serve as a resource for nutritional care. We present CPRs for energy and protein requirements for children with CKD stages 2-5 and those on dialysis (CKD2-5D). We address energy requirements in the context of poor growth, obesity, and different levels of physical activity, together with the additional protein needs to compensate for dialysate losses. We describe how to achieve the dietary prescription for energy and protein using breastmilk, formulas, food, and dietary supplements, which can be incorporated into everyday practice. Statements with a low grade of evidence, or based on opinion, must be considered and adapted for the individual patient by the treating physician and dietitian according to their clinical judgment. Research recommendations have been suggested. The CPRs will be regularly audited and updated by the PRNT.
  • Syrjämäki, Marja; Sajaniemi, Nina; Suhonen, Eira; Alijoki, Alisa; Nislin, Mari (2017)
    The aim of this article is to investigate the pedagogical learning environment in early childhood special education (ECSE). The theoretical framework is based on a conception of interaction being as well a basic human need as, according to sociocultural theories, the basis of learning. Our study was conducted in ECSE kindergarten groups (N = 17) in the area of Helsinki, Finland. We were interested in the overall quality of the pedagogical environment, the quality of enhancing peer interaction (EPI) and the pedagogy for EPI amongst children with diverse characteristics and needs. Quality was evaluated using the quantitative Learning Environment Assessment, completed with qualitative data, which consisted of the researcher's observations and interviews. The quantitative data were presented with descriptive statistics. Qualitative content analysis was used to make a closer examination of EPI pedagogy. The study indicated good pedagogical quality. EPI quality was predictably good due to high overall quality. Our findings highlighted ECSE professionals' versatile pedagogical modes in structuring activities and space and intensive methods in EPI and participation, especially in scaffolding communication (with augmentative or alternative communication systems when needed) and supporting social competence.