Browsing by Subject "active"

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  • Allevato, V.; Viitanen, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Civano, F.; Suh, H.; Shankar, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Ferrara, A.; Gilli, R.; Miyaji, T.; Marchesi, S.; Cappelluti, N.; Salvato, M. (2019)
    Aims. We perform clustering measurements of 800 X-ray selected Chandra COSMOS Legacy (CCL) Type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGN) with known spectroscopic redshift to probe the halo mass dependence on AGN host galaxy properties, such as galaxy stellar mass M-star, star formation rate (SFR), and specific black hole accretion rate (BHAR; lambda(BHAR)) in the redshift range z;=;[0-3]. Methods. We split the sample of AGN with known spectroscopic redshits according to M-star, SFR and lambda(BHAR), while matching the distributions in terms of the other parameters, including redshift. We measured the projected two-point correlation function w(p)(r(p)) and modeled the clustering signal, for the different subsamples, with the two-halo term to derive the large-scale bias b and corresponding typical mass of the hosting halo. Results. We find no significant dependence of the large-scale bias and typical halo mass on galaxy stellar mass and specific BHAR for CCL Type 2 AGN at mean z;similar to;1, while a negative dependence on SFR is observed, i.e. lower SFR AGN reside in richer environment. Mock catalogs of AGN, matched to have the same X-ray luminosity, stellar mass, lambda(BHAR), and SFR of CCL Type 2 AGN, almost reproduce the observed M-star - M-h, lambda(BHAR) - M-h and SFR-M-h relations, when assuming a fraction of satellite AGN f(AGN)(sat) similar to 0.15fAGNsat similar to 0.15$ f_{\mathrm{AGN}}{\mathrm{sat}} \sim 0.15 $. This corresponds to a ratio of the probabilities of satellite to central AGN of being active Q;similar to;2. Mock matched normal galaxies follow a slightly steeper M-star - M-h relation, in which low mass mock galaxies reside in less massive halos than mock AGN of similar mass. Moreover, matched mock normal galaxies are less biased than mock AGN with similar specific BHAR and SFR, at least for Q > 1.
  • Ylösmäki, Erkko; Fusciello, Manlio; Martins, Beatriz; Feola, Sara; Hamdan, Firas; Chiaro, Jacopo; Ylösmäki, Leena; Vaughan, Matthew J.; Viitala, Tapani; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Cerullo, Vincenzo (2021)
    Background Intratumoral BCG therapy, one of the earliest immunotherapies, can lead to infiltration of immune cells into a treated tumor. However, an increase in the number of BCG-induced tumor-specific T cells in the tumor microenvironment could lead to enhanced therapeutic effects. Methods Here, we have developed a novel cancer vaccine platform based on BCG that can broaden BCG-induced immune responses to include tumor antigens. By physically attaching tumor-specific peptides onto the mycobacterial outer membrane, we were able to induce strong systemic and intratumoral T cell-specific immune responses toward the attached tumor antigens. These therapeutic peptides can be efficiently attached to the mycobacterial outer membrane using a poly-lysine sequence N-terminally fused to the tumor-specific peptides. Results Using two mouse models of melanoma and a mouse model of colorectal cancer, we observed that the antitumor immune responses of BCG could be improved by coating the BCG with tumor-specific peptides. In addition, by combining this novel cancer vaccine platform with anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy, the number of responders to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy was markedly increased. Conclusions This study shows that intratumoral BCG immunotherapy can be improved by coating the bacteria with modified tumor-specific peptides. In addition, this improved BCG immunotherapy can be combined with ICI therapy to obtain enhanced tumor growth control. These results warrant clinical testing of this novel cancer vaccine platform.
  • Lumme, E.; Kazachenko, M. D.; Fisher, G. H.; Welsch, B. T.; Pomoell, J.; Kilpua, E.K.J. (2019)
    We study how the input-data cadence affects the photospheric energy and helicity injection estimates in eruptive NOAA Active Region 11158. We sample the novel 2.25-minute vector magnetogram and Dopplergram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft to create input datasets of variable cadences ranging from 2.25 minutes to 24 hours. We employ state-of-the-art data processing, velocity, and electric-field inversion methods for deriving estimates of the energy and helicity injections from these datasets. We find that the electric-field inversion methods that reproduce the observed magnetic-field evolution through the use of Faraday's law are more stable against variable cadence: the PDFI (PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal, where PTD refers to Poloidal-Toroidal Decomposition, and FLCT to Fourier Local Correlation Tracking) electric-field inversion method produces consistent injection estimates for cadences from 2.25 minutes up to two hours, implying that the photospheric processes acting on time scales below two hours contribute little to the injections, or that they are below the sensitivity of the input data and the PDFI method. On other hand, the electric-field estimate derived from the output of DAVE4VM (Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms), which does not fulfill Faraday's law exactly, produces significant variations in the energy and helicity injection estimates in the 2.25 minutes - two hours cadence range. We also present a third, novel DAVE4VM-based electric-field estimate, which corrects the poor inductivity of the raw DAVE4VM estimate. This method is less sensitive to the changes of cadence, but it still faces significant issues for the lowest of considered cadences (two hours). We find several potential problems in both PDFI- and DAVE4VM-based injection estimates and conclude that the quality of both should be surveyed further in controlled environments.