Browsing by Subject "adult"

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  • Malkamäki, S.; Näreaho, A.; Lavikainen, A.; Oksanen, A.; Sukura, A. (2019)
    Berries and vegetables are potential transmission vehicles for eggs of pathogenic parasites, such as Echinococcus spp. We developed a SYBR Green based semi-quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) method for detection of Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus canadensis DNA from berry samples. A set of primers based on the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene was designed and evaluated. To assess the efficacy of the assay, we spiked bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus) with a known amount of E. multilocularis eggs. The detection limit for the assay using the NAD1_88 primer set was 4.37 × 10−5 ng/μl of E. multilocularis DNA. Under artificial contamination of berries, 50 E. multilocularis eggs were reliably detected in 250 g of bilberries. Analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 100% with three eggs. As an application of the assay, 21 bilberry samples from Finnish market places and 21 bilberry samples from Estonia were examined. Previously described sieving and DNA extraction methods were used, and the samples were analyzed for E. multilocularis and E. canadensis DNA using semi-quantitative real-time PCR and a melting curve analysis of the amplified products. Echinococcus DNA was not detected in any of the commercial berry samples. This easy and fast method can be used for an efficient detection of E. multilocularis and E. canadensis in bilberries or other berries, and it is applicable also for fruits and vegetables. © 2019 The Authors
  • Vehkalahti, M. M.; Palotie, U.; Valaste, Maria (2020)
    Aim To evaluate age-specific aspects and changes in volume and content of endodontic treatment for adults visiting private dentists in Finland in 2012 and 2017. Methodology This study utilized register-based data of private dental care. The observation unit of the aggregated macro-level data was age group, with 5-year age groups from 20 to 24 years onwards and the oldest group combining all patients aged 90 years and over. Data from years 2012 and 2017 included all the oral health care of 2.04 million patients receiving reimbursement for treatment by private dentists; a total of 183 932 patients received at least one endodontic treatment and were analysed. The number of teeth receiving endodontic treatment was counted separately as pulp cappings, pulpotomies and root canal fillings according to number of canals filled per tooth. Statistical associations were assessed as correlation coefficients. Results The mean age of endodontic patients was 53.6 years in 2012 and 55.9 years in 2017. In both years, 38% were aged from 50 to 64 years. In 2012, 9.9%, and in 2017, 8.0% of patients received at least one endodontic treatment; the older the patients, the fewer received endodontic treatment (r = -0.9). From 2012 to 2017, numbers of all patients and treatments decreased, endodontic patients and treatments even more notably, and in all age groups. Per thousand patients in 2017, 62.1 teeth received root canal treatment and 14.9 pulp capping. Pulp capping comprised 19.2%, pulpotomies 0.8% and root canal fillings 80.0% of teeth receiving endodontic treatment. Of root filled teeth, 45.1% received filling in one canal, 17.0% in two and 37.9% in three or more canals, multi-canal options being less frequent in older patients (r = -0.94). Conclusions Endodontic treatment, received by 9% of adult patients visiting private dentists in Finland, was strongly age-dependent, showing a decreasing trend with age and time.
  • Sagath, L.; Lehtokari, V.-L.; Välipakka, S.; Udd, B.; Wallgren-Pettersson, C.; Pelin, K.; Kiiski, K. (2018)
    Background: Our previous array, the Comparative Genomic Hybridisation design (CGH-array) for nemaline myopathy (NM), named the NM-CGH array, revealed pathogenic copy number variation (CNV) in the genes for nebulin (NEB) and tropomyosin 3 (TPM3), as well as recurrent CNVs in the segmental duplication (SD), i.e. triplicate, region of NEB (TRI, exons 82-89, 90-97, 98-105). In the light of this knowledge, we have designed and validated an extended CGH array, which includes a selection of 187 genes known to cause neuromuscular disorders (NMDs). Objective: Our aim was to develop a reliable method for CNV detection in genes related to neuromuscular disorders for routine mutation detection and analysis, as a much-needed complement to sequencing methods. Methods: We have developed a novel custom-made 4×180 k CGH array for the diagnostics of NMDs. It includes the same tiled ultra-high density coverage of the 12 known or putative NM genes as our 8×60 k NM-CGH-array but also comprises a selection of 175 additional genes associated with NMDs, including titin (TTN), at a high to very high coverage. The genes were divided into three coverage groups according to known and potential pathogenicity in neuromuscular disorders. Results: The array detected known and putative CNVs in all three gene coverage groups, including the repetitive regions of NEB and TTN. Conclusions: The targeted neuromuscular disorder 4×180 k array-CGH (NMD-CGH-array v1.0) design allows CNV detection for a broader spectrum of neuromuscular disorders at a high resolution. © 2018 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
  • Wetselaar, Peter; Manfredini, Daniele; Ahlberg, Jari; Johansson, Anders; Aarab, Ghizlane; Papagianni, Chryssa E.; Sevilla, Marisol Reyes; Koutris, Michail; Lobbezoo, Frank (2019)
    Objectives Tooth wear is a common finding in adult patients with dental sleep disorders. The aim of this paper was to review the literature on the possible associations between tooth wear and the following dental sleep disorders: sleep-related oro-facial pain, oral moistening disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and sleep bruxism. Methods A PubMed search was performed on 1 June 2018 using MeSH terms in the following query: Tooth Wear AND (Facial Pain OR Temporomandibular Joint Disorders OR Xerostomia OR Sialorrhea OR Gastroesophageal Reflux OR Sleep Apnea Syndrome OR Sleep Bruxism). Results The query yielded 706 reports on tooth wear and the mentioned dental sleep disorders. Several associations between tooth wear and the dental sleep disorders were suggested in the literature. It could be concluded that: (a) tooth wear is associated with dental pain and/or hypersensitivity; (b) oral dryness is associated with tooth wear, oro-facial pain and sleep bruxism; (c) GERD is associated with tooth wear, oro-facial pain, oral dryness, OSAS and sleep bruxism; (d) OSAS is associated with oral dryness, GERD and sleep bruxism; and (e) sleep bruxism is associated with tooth wear. Conclusions Tooth wear is associated with the dental sleep disorders oro-facial pain, oral dryness, GERD and sleep bruxism. The dental sleep disorders are interlinked with each other, which leads to indirect associations as well, and makes the consequences of each single condition difficult to disentangle. Knowledge of these associations is clinically relevant, but more research is needed to confirm their validity.
  • Willberg, Tytti; Sivonen, Ville; Linder, Pia; Dietz, Aarno (2021)
    Background: A large number of different speech-in-noise (SIN) tests are available for testing cochlear implant (CI) recipients, but few studies have compared the different tests in the same patient population to assess how well their results correlate. Methods: A clinically representative group of 80 CI users conducted the Finnish versions of the matrix sentence test, the simplified matrix sentence test, and the digit triplet test. The results were analyzed for correlations between the different tests and for differences among the participants, including age and device modality. Results: Strong and statistically significant correlations were observed between all of the tests. No floor or ceiling effects were observed with any of the tests when using the adaptive test procedure. Age or the length of device use showed no correlation to SIN perception, but bilateral CI users showed slightly better results in comparison to unilateral or bimodal users. Conclusions: Three SIN tests that differ in length and complexity of the test material provided comparable results in a diverse CI user group.
  • Auvinen, Raija; Nohynek, Hanna; Syrjänen, Ritva; Ollgren, Jukka; Kerttula, Tuija; Mäntylä, Jarkko; Ikonen, Niina; Loginov, Raisa; Haveri, Anu; Kurkela, Satu; Skogberg, Kirsi (2021)
    Background We compared the clinical characteristics, findings, and outcomes of hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) or influenza to detect relevant differences. Methods From December 2019 to April 2020, we recruited all eligible hospitalized adults with respiratory infection to a prospective observational study at a tertiary care hospital in Finland. Influenza and SARS-CoV-2 infections were confirmed by RT-PCR. Follow-up lasted for 3 months from admission. Results We included 61 patients, of whom 28 were COVID-19 and 33 influenza patients with median ages of 53 and 56 years. Majority of both COVID-19 and influenza patients were men (61% vs. 67%) and had at least one comorbidity (68% vs. 85%). Pulmonary diseases and current smoking were less common among COVID-19 than influenza patients (5 [18%] vs. 15 [45%], p=.03 and 1 [4%] vs. 10 [30%], p=.008). In chest X-ray at admission, ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and consolidations were more frequent among COVID-19 than influenza patients (19 [68%] and 7 [21%], p.001). Severe disease and intensive care unit (ICU) admission occurred more often among COVID-19 than influenza patients (26 [93%] vs. 19 [58%], p=.003 and 8 [29%] vs. 2 [6%], p=.034). COVID-19 patients were hospitalized longer than influenza patients (six days [IQR 4-21] vs. 3 [2-4], p.001). Conclusions Bilateral GGOs and consolidations in chest X-ray may help to differentiate COVID-19 from influenza. Hospitalized COVID-19 patients had more severe disease, required longer hospitalization and were admitted to ICU more often than influenza patients, which has important implications for public health policies.
  • Cowley, Benjamin; Holmstrom, Edua; Juurmaa, Kristiina; Kovarskis, Levas; Krause, Christina M. (2016)
    Background: We report a randomized controlled clinical trial of neurofeedback therapy intervention for ADHD/ADD in adults. We focus on internal mechanics of neurofeedback learning, to elucidate the primary role of cortical self-regulation in neurofeedback. We report initial results; more extensive analysis will follow. Methods: Trial has two phases: intervention and follow-up. The intervention consisted of neurofeedback treatment, including intake and outtake measurements, using a waiting-list control group. Treatment involved 40 h-long sessions 2-5 times per week. Training involved either theta/beta or sensorimotor-rhythm regimes, adapted by adding a novel "inverse-training" condition to promote self-regulation. Follow-up (ongoing) will consist of self-report and executive function tests. Setting: Intake and outtake measurements were conducted at University of Helsinki. Treatment was administered at partner clinic Mental Capital Care, Helsinki. Randomization: We randomly allocated half the sample then adaptively allocated the remainder to minimize baseline differences in prognostic variables. Blinding: Waiting-list control design meant trial was not blinded. Participants: Fifty-four adult Finnish participants (mean age 36 years; 29 females) were recruited after screening by psychiatric review. Forty-four had ADHD diagnoses, 10 had ADD. Measurements: Symptoms were assessed by computerized attention test (T.O.V.A.) and self-report scales, at intake and outtake. Performance during neurofeedback trials was recorded. Results: Participants were recruited and completed intake measurements during summer 2012, before assignment to treatment and control, September 2012. Outtake measurements ran April August 2013. After dropouts, 23 treatment and 21 waiting-list participants remained for analysis. Initial analysis showed that, compared to waiting-list control, neurofeedback promoted improvement of self-reported ADHD symptoms, but did not show transfer of learning to T.O.V.A. Comprehensive analysis will be reported elsewhere.
  • Honkanen, Tuomas; Mäntysaari, M.; Leino, Tuomo; Avela, J.; Kerttula, L.; Haapamäki, V.; Kyröläinen, Heikki (2019)
    Background: A small cross sectional area (CSA) of the paraspinal muscles may be related to low back pain among military aviators but previous studies have mainly concentrated on spinal disc degeneration. Therefore, the primary aim of the study was to investigate the changes in muscle CSA and composition of the psoas and paraspinal muscles during a 5-year follow up among Finnish Air Force (FINAF) fighter pilots. Methods: Study population consisted of 26 volunteered FINAF male fighter pilots (age: 20.6 (±0.6) at the baseline). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were collected at baseline and after 5 years of follow-up. CSA and composition of the paraspinal and psoas muscles were obtained at the levels of 3-4 and 4-5 lumbar spine. Maximal isometric strength tests were only performed on one occasion at baseline. Results: The follow-up comparisons indicated that the mean CSA of the paraspinal muscles increased (p <0.01) by 8% at L3-4 level and 7% at L4-5 level during the 5-year period. There was no change in muscle composition during the follow-up period. The paraspinal and psoas muscles' CSA was positively related to overall maximal isometric strength at the baseline. However, there was no association between LBP and muscle composition or CSA. Conclusions: The paraspinal muscles' CSA increased among FINAF fighter pilots during the first 5 years of service. This might be explained by physically demanding work and regular physical activity. However, no associations between muscle composition or CSA and low back pain (LBP) experienced were observed after the five-year follow-up. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Kaipio, Johanna; Karisalmi, N.; Hiekkanen, K.; Stenhammar, H.; Lahdenne, P. (IOS PRESS, 2019)
    Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
    Patient experience (PX) is an important evaluation criterion for quality in healthcare. Compared to patient satisfaction, however less research has focused on the development of instruments to measure experiences of patients and their families. In the article, we describe the process of developing a PX questionnaire for the parents of pediatric patients in the context of children's hospital and illustrate the questionnaire items for measuring PX. The phases of the development process included retrospective interviews, description of the themes influencing PX and the metrics for measuring PX, as well as iterative development of three versions of questionnaires including data gathering and factor analysis. The final versions of the surveys suggested for implementation at the hospitals include eight PX statements for the outpatient clinic and five statements for the ward. Compared to satisfaction surveys, the developed surveys emphasize the aspects of parent's attitude towards the illness, support for families, and daily arrangements with a child patient. © 2019 American Psychological Association Inc. All rights reserved.
  • COST Action GENIEURI BM1106 Microb; Vork, Lisa; Penders, John; Jalanka, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; de Vos, Willem M.; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E. (2021)
    Introduction Stool consistency has been associated with fecal microbial composition. Stool consistency often varies over time, in subjects with and without gastrointestinal disorders, raising the question whether variability in the microbial composition should be considered in microbiota studies. We evaluated within-subject day-to-day variability in stool consistency and the association with the fecal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy subjects, over seven days. Methods Twelve IBS patients and 12 healthy subjects collected fecal samples during seven consecutive days. Stool consistency was determined by the patient-reported Bristol Stool Scale (BSS) and fecal dry weight percentage. 16S rRNA V4 gene sequencing was performed and microbial richness (alpha diversity; Chao1 index, observed number of species, effective Shannon index) and microbial community structure (beta diversity; Bray-Curtis distance, generalized UniFrac, and taxa abundance on family level) were determined. Results Linear mixed-effects models showed significant associations between stool consistency and microbial richness, but no time effect. This implies that between-subject but not within-subject variation in microbiota over time can partially be explained by variation in stool consistency. Redundancy analysis showed a significant association between stool consistency and microbial community structure, but additional linear mixed-effects models did not demonstrate a time effect on this. Conclusion This study supports an association between stool consistency and fecal microbiota, but no effect of day-to-day fluctuations in stool consistency within seven days. This consolidates the importance of considering stool consistency in gut microbiota research, though confirms the validity of single fecal sampling to represent an individual's microbiota at a given time point. NCT00775060.
  • Kesävuori, Risto; Raivio, Peter; Jokinen, Janne J.; Sahlman, Antero; Teittinen, Kari; Vento, Antti (2018)
    Objective: To report the learning curve and early results of robotic mitral valve repairs in comparison with propensity score-matched sternotomy controls after the adoption of a robotic mitral valve surgery program in a university teaching hospital. Methods: A total of 142 patients underwent robotic mitral valve repair due to degenerative mitral regurgitation between May 2011 and December 2015. Control patients operated on via the conventional sternotomy approach were selected by the use of propensity score analysis resulting in 2 well-matched study groups. Results: Valve repair rate was 98.6% and 97.9% in the robotic and sternotomy groups, respectively. Operation length, cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic crossclamp, and ventilation times were shorter in the sternotomy group. All of these times were statistically significantly reduced within the robotic group during the learning curve. Even though there was no statistically significant difference in the rate of perioperative complications between the groups, 3 patients in the robotic group required postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to low cardiac output, and 1 patient in the robotic group died. In the robotic and sternotomy groups, 86.3% versus 84.7% of patients had grade Conclusions: The present series reports the entire early learning curve related to the introduction of robotic mitral valve repair in our institution. In all, repair rate and early durability were acceptable, but more patients in the robotic group had serious complications. Early major robotic complications that occurred may have been related to the simultaneous use of intra-aortic occlusion.
  • Junna, Liina (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    Self-rated health (SRH) is a frequently used survey indicator of general health. It is periodically utilised in the study of educational health disparities. Several researchers have, however, suggested that systematic population sub group differences in health self-ratings (reporting heterogeneity) may results in SRH reflecting a different health status, or aspects of health, for different educational groups. Previous studies imply that the associations between SRH and other indicators of health may be strengthened by higher education. However, the studies disagree on the strength and the scope of the interaction effect. Comparability is also an issue due to, for example, the variation in the selected health indicators by which SRH is assessed. No such studies have so far been conducted in Norther Europe. The purpose of this Master’s thesis is to address educational SRH reporting heterogeneity. Using quantitative methods, this thesis analyses which aspects of health are included in dichotomised poor or very poor SRH ratings, and whether education moderates the relationship between SRH and the indicators of health. The selected health indicators represent five health dimensions identified in previous studies: clinical health, functional health, health behaviours, mental health and bodily symptoms and experiences. The analyses are conducted using logistic regression and regression –based nonlinear decomposition methods. The study utilises the Health 2000 data (n= 5586) for the household and institution dwelling population over the age of 30 residing in mainland Finland. The data is nationally representative and consists of a clinical- and mental health examination, and survey sections. Overall, a high volume of somatic complaints was found strongly associated with poor self-rated health for all educational groups. Other significant contributors were functional health, diagnosed mental health conditions, and to some extent diagnosed diseases. An educational interaction effect was found for cardiovascular disease, subjective functional limitations in everyday tasks, and high volume of somatic complaints. In all cases education strengthened the association. However, for the majority of the indicators, SRH was associated with, no interaction effect was found. Compared to those respondents with a higher education, those with lower educational attainments more often reported poor SRH, but the selected health indicators and demographic variables explained virtually the whole difference. The study then, to some extent, concurs with earlier findings of higher education strengthening some of the associating between poor SRH and other indicators of health. However, the effect was statistically significant only when comparing basic education to higher educational attainments, and it was less systematic than some of the previous studies have suggested.
  • Komulainen, K; Pulkki-Raback, L; Jokela, M; Lyytikäinen, LP; Pitkänen, N; Laitinen, T; Hintsanen, M; Elovainio, M; Hintsa, T; Jula, A (2018)
    Objectives:The life-course development of body mass index (BMI) may be driven by interactions between genes and obesity-inducing social environments. We examined whether lower parental or own education accentuates the genetic risk for higher BMI over the life course, and whether diet and physical activity account for the educational differences in genetic associations with BMI.Subjects/Methods:The study comprised 2441 participants (1319 women, 3-18 years at baseline) from the prospective, population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. BMI (kg/m 2) trajectories were calculated from 18 to 49 years, using data from six time points spanning 31 years. A polygenic risk score for BMI was calculated as a weighted sum of risk alleles in 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Education was assessed via self-reports, measured prospectively from participants in adulthood and from parents when participants were children. Diet and physical activity were self-reported in adulthood.Results:Mean BMI increased from 22.6 to 26.6 kg/m 2 during the follow-up. In growth curve analyses, the genetic risk score was associated with faster BMI increase over time (b=0.02, (95% CI, 0.01-0.02, P
  • Shulga, A.; Savolainen, S.; Kirveskari, E.; Mäkelä, J.P. (2020)
    Introduction: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) and induces plastic changes in the human corticospinal tract. We have previously shown that PAS consisting of TMS pulses given at 100% of stimulator output and high-frequency PNS is beneficial for motor rehabilitation of patients with a chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The therapeutic possibilities of this PAS variant for walking rehabilitation of paraplegic patients are unexplored. Case presentation: A 47-year old man with traumatic incomplete paraplegia (AIS D, neurological level T7) received PAS to his left leg for 3 months at 12 months post injury (PAS1) and for an additional 3 months at 24 months post injury (PAS2). The right leg had normal AIS scores and was not stimulated. Before PAS, the patient was nonambulatory, could not stand without weight support, and was consequently not eligible for conventional walking rehabilitation. After PAS1, the patient could stand for 1.5 min and take 13 steps (24 steps in follow up) on parallel bars without weight support and was enrolled into conventional walking rehabilitation. He achieved independent walking ability with a rollator. During PAS2, walking distance increased 2.4 times faster than during the preceding year. The left leg AIS score and spinal cord independence measure mobility subscore increased. No adverse effects were detected. Discussion: This is the first report of PAS with a high-frequency peripheral component that enabled and promoted walking rehabilitation. Together with previous reports on this technique, this result encourages further research into its therapeutic potential and mechanism. © 2020, The Author(s).
  • Pajunen, T.; Vuori, E.; Lunetta, P. (2018)
    Background: Post-mortem (PM) ethanol production may hamper the interpretation of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in victims of drowning. Different exclusion criteria (e.g. cases with low BAC or with protracted interval between death and toxicological analysis) have been proposed with no factual figures to reduce the potential bias due to PM ethanol production when examining the prevalence rates for alcohol-related drowning. The aim of this study is to verify the extent to which PM alcohol production may affect the accuracy of studies on drowning and alcohol. Findings: Unintentional fatal drowning cases (n = 967) for which a full medico-legal autopsy and toxicological analysis was performed, in Finland, from 2000 to 2013, and relevant variables (demographic data of the victims, month of incident, PM submersion time, blood alcohol concentration, urine alcohol concentration (UAC), vitreous humour alcohol concentration (VAC) were available. Overall, out of 967 unintentional drownings, 623 (64.4%) were positive for alcohol (BAC > 0 mg/dL), 595 (61.5%) had a BAC ≥ 50 mg/dL, and 567 (58.6%) a BAC ≥ 100 mg/dL. Simultaneous measurements, in each victim, of BAC, UAC, and VAC revealed PM ethanol production in only 4 victims (BAC: 25 mg/dL – 48 mg/dL). These false positive cases represented 0.4% of drownings with BAC > 0 mg/dL and 14.3% of drownings with BAC > 0 mg/dL and <50 mg/dL. Conclusions: The present study suggests that PM ethanol production has a limited impact on research addressing the prevalence rate for alcohol-related drowning and that the use of too rigorous exclusion criteria, such as those previously recommended, may led to a significant underestimation of actual alcohol-positive drowning cases. © 2018, The Author(s).
  • Fagerstedt, K.W.; Salonen, T.; Zhao, F.; Kytölä, S.; Böhling, T.; Andersson, L.C. (2018)
    Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a soft-tissue neoplasm most frequently found in the distal extremities of middle-aged adults. Most myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma are low-grade tumors with propensity for local recurrence after incomplete removal. We report a myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma which developed in the foot of a 41-year-old male and showed an exceptionally aggressive course with metastatic spread and fatal outcome within 16 months. We managed to establish a spontaneously transformed continuous cell line, called JU-PI, from a metastatic lesion. The JU-PI cells have a sub-tetraploid karyotype including the 1;10 chromosomal translocation and amplification of the proximal end of 3p; these features are considered genetic signatures of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Both the primary tumor and the JU-PI cells showed nuclear expression of the TFE3 transcription factor but TFE3-activating chromosomal rearrangements were not found. To our knowledge, JU-PI is the first established myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma cell line. JU-PI cells offer a tool for investigating the molecular oncology of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. © 2018, © The Author(s) 2018.
  • Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Taimela, Simo; Kanto, Kari; Järvinen, Teppo L. N. (2017)
    Introduction: Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) is the most commonly performed surgical intervention for shoulder pain, yet evidence on its efficacy is limited. The rationale for the surgery rests on the tenet that symptom relief is achieved through decompression of the rotator cuff tendon passage. The primary objective of this superiority trial is to compare the efficacy of ASD versus diagnostic arthroscopy (DA) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS), where DA differs only by the lack of subacromial decompression. A third group of supervised progressive exercise therapy (ET) will allow for pragmatic assessment of the relative benefits of surgical versus non-operative treatment strategies. Methods and Analysis: Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial is an ongoing multicentre, three-group randomised controlled study. We performed two-fold concealed allocation, first by randomising patients to surgical (ASD or DA) or conservative (ET) treatment in 2:1 ratio and then those allocated to surgery further to ASD or DA in 1:1 ratio. Our two primary outcomes are pain at rest and at arm activity, assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). We will quantify the treatment effect as the difference between the groups in the change in the VAS scales with the associated 95% CI at 24 months. Our secondary outcomes are functional assessment (Constant score and Simple shoulder test), quality of life (15D and SF-36), patient satisfaction, proportions of responders and non-responders, reoperations/treatment conversions, all at 2 years post-randomisation, as well as adverse effects and complications. We recruited a total of 210 patients from three tertiary referral centres. We will conduct the primary analysis on the intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and Dissemination: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Pirkanmaa Hospital District and duly registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. © 2017 Article author(s).
  • Huang, Yisong; Ollikainen, Miina; Sipilä, Pyry; Mustelin, Linda; Wang, Xin; Su, Shaoyong; Huan, Tianxiao; Levy, Daniel; Wilson, James; Snieder, Harold; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xiaoling (2018)
    Recently, 2 transcriptome-wide studies identified 40 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to blood pressure. However, to what extent these BP-related gene expression signatures and their associations with BP are driven by genetic or environmental factors has not been investigated. In this study of 391 twins (193 twin pairs and 5 singletons; age 55-69 years; 40% male; 57% monozygous) recruited from the Finnish Twin Cohort, transcriptome-wide data on peripheral leukocytes were obtained using the Illumina HT12 V4 array. Our transcriptome-wide analysis identified 1 gene (MOK [MAPK/MAK/MRK overlapping kinase], P=7.16x10(-8)) with its expression levels associated with systolic BP at the cutoff of false-discovery rate
  • Global Burden of Disease Self-Harm Collaboration; Orpana, H.M.; Doku, D.T.; Meretoja, T.J.; Shiri, R.; Vasankari, T. (2019)
    Objectives To use the estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 to describe patterns of suicide mortality globally, regionally, and for 195 countries and territories by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index, and to describe temporal trends between 1990 and 2016. Design Systematic analysis. Main outcome measures Crude and age standardised rates from suicide mortality and years of life lost were compared across regions and countries, and by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index (a composite measure of fertility, income, and education). Results The total number of deaths from suicide increased by 6.7% (95% uncertainty interval 0.4% to 15.6%) globally over the 27 year study period to 817 000 (762 000 to 884 000) deaths in 2016. However, the age standardised mortality rate for suicide decreased by 32.7% (27.2% to 36.6%) worldwide between 1990 and 2016, similar to the decline in the global age standardised mortality rate of 30.6%. Suicide was the leading cause of age standardised years of life lost in the Global Burden of Disease region of high income Asia Pacific and was among the top 10 leading causes in eastern Europe, central Europe, western Europe, central Asia, Australasia, southern Latin America, and high income North America. Rates for men were higher than for women across regions, countries, and age groups, except for the 15 to 19 age group. There was variation in the female to male ratio, with higher ratios at lower levels of Socio-demographic index. Women experienced greater decreases in mortality rates (49.0%, 95% uncertainty interval 42.6% to 54.6%) than men (23.8%, 15.6% to 32.7%). Conclusions Age standardised mortality rates for suicide have greatly reduced since 1990, but suicide remains an important contributor to mortality worldwide. Suicide mortality was variable across locations, between sexes, and between age groups. Suicide prevention strategies can be targeted towards vulnerable populations if they are informed by variations in mortality rates. © Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.
  • Vink, P.; Torrell, J.M.R.; Fructuoso, A.S.; Kim, Sung-Joo; Kim, Sang-Il; Zaltzman, J.; Ortiz, F.; Plana, J.M.C.; Rodriguez, A.M.F.; Rodrigo, H.R.; Marti, M.C.; Perez, R.; Roncero, F.M.G.; Kumar, D.; Chiang, Y.-J.; Doucette, K.; Pipeleers, L.; Morales, M.L.A.; Rodriguez-Ferrero, M.L.; Secchi, Antonio; McNeil, S.A.; Campora, L.; Di Paolo, E.; El Idrissi, M.; López-Fauqued, M.; Salaun, B.; Heineman, T.C.; Oostvogels, L. (2020)
    Background. The incidence of herpes zoster is up to 9 times higher in immunosuppressed solid organ transplant recipients than in the general population. We investigated the immunogenicity and safety of an adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) in renal transplant (RT) recipients ≥18 years of age receiving daily immunosuppressive therapy. Methods. In this phase 3, randomized (1:1), observer-blind, multicenter trial, RT recipients were enrolled and received 2 doses of RZV or placebo 1-2 months (M) apart 4-18M posttransplant. Anti-glycoprotein E (gE) antibody concentrations, gE-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies, and vaccine response rates were assessed at 1M post-dose 1, and 1M and 12M post-dose 2. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded for 7 and 30 days after each dose, respectively. Solicited general symptoms and unsolicited AEs were also collected 7 days before first vaccination. Serious AEs (including biopsy-proven allograft rejections) and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were recorded up to 12M post-dose 2. Results. Two hundred sixty-four participants (RZV: 132; placebo: 132) were enrolled between March 2014 and April 2017. gE-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were higher in RZV than placebo recipients across postvaccination time points and persisted above prevaccination baseline 12M post-dose 2. Local AEs were reported more frequently by RZV than placebo recipients. Overall occurrences of renal function changes, rejections, unsolicited AEs, serious AEs, and pIMDs were similar between groups. Conclusions. RZV was immunogenic in chronically immunosuppressed RT recipients. Immunogenicity persisted through 12M postvaccination. No safety concerns arose. © The Author(s) 2019.