Browsing by Subject "algae"

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  • Michel, Fabienne; Knaapila, Antti; Hartmann, Christina; Siegrist, Michael (2021)
    Within recent years, demand as well as supply of products to replace meat, so called meat alternatives, have increased. For future products, new plant-based protein sources are of high interest. Protein from pea and especially from algae provide huge potential for human nutrition as well as for the environment. To provide insight on consumers' opinions on the development of new meat alternatives, this study investigated consumers' opinions of pea and algae burgers compared to the traditional beef burger in terms of taste, health, and environmental friendliness. It has also explored the influence of factors such as meat commitment, food neophobia, and the attitude towards vegetarians and vegans; it has then compared the findings between three European countries with different culinary backgrounds. The online survey was conducted with meat-eating participants from Germany (N=567), France (N=605), and the United Kingdom (N=562). Participants in all three countries expected pea and algae burgers to be less tasty, but healthier and more environmentally friendly compared to the beef burger. Expectations of taste, health, and environmental friendliness of pea and algae burgers were negatively influenced by higher levels of meat commitment, more negative attitudes towards vegetarian and vegan lifestyles, and higher food neophobia. Although the attitudes towards vegetarian lifestyles were generally negative, pea and algae emerged as promising protein sources because of their favorable health and environmental friendliness expectations. Nevertheless, negative taste expectations and attitudes towards meat-free diets remain a challenge for the adoption of more plant-based diets.
  • Roiha, Petra (2019)
    Finnish Meteorological Institute Contributions 157
    Managing the sea environment is a complicated interdisciplinary task. To understand changes in the sea, knowledge of the present state is essential. Many variables are monitored constantly, and long historical data sets exist. However, the spatial and temporal data coverage varies widely over the Baltic Sea. The preparation for the emerging circumstances demands the ability to forecast the future marine conditions. Thus, improved modelling and forecasting systems are needed. In this thesis, methods were developed to 1) understand the present state of the sea and 2) predict future conditions. The study areas were the Bothnian Sea and the Eastern Gotland Basin. Argo floats are a common tool in the oceans, but so far they have not been used in shallow marginal seas, such as the Baltic Sea. The autonomous measurement device brings possibilities to fill the gaps in the existing observation network (e.g. research vessels, moorings) as well as to enable new scientific experiments. To better understand the present state of the Northern Baltic Sea, methods were developed using the Argo floats. The salinity, temperature and GPS data collected with these floats from the area is analysed in this thesis for the first time and its applicability for studying the different physical phenomena, such as currents at the float diving depth and wind induced mixing, are evaluated. The usability of Argo data was compared with the ship-borne CTD data. Due to the higher frequency of the Argo data, the seasonal variations can be studied in detail with this method. However, the spatial coverage of the Argo data is not as good as the CTD data collected with a research vessel due to the fact that the floats only operate near the deep areas of the Baltic Sea. To be able to predict the future conditions of the Baltic Sea, monthly ensemble forecasting system was developed. A 3D biogeochemical model was forced with monthly ensembles of the atmospheric forcing and the results were applied to forecast upwelling events and harmful algal blooms. The monthly ensemble forecasts for upwelling events were evaluated. The result was that the upwelling events could be forecasted on a weekly scale. This enables, for example, better planning of the scientific study of upwelling events or the improvement of local-scale weather forecasts. The same probability-based ensemble prediction system was used to produce harmful algal bloom forecasts. The forecasts showed the effects of the weather scenarios on marine biogeochemistry. In the future, it will be possible to interconnect the observations and forecasts better than before. The more dense observations can be used to improve the computational methods, for example, by assimilation. The probability-based forecasts can help, for example, to mitigate the environmental risks.
  • Lähteenmäki-Uutela, Anu; Rahikainen, Moona; Lonkila, Annika; Yang, Baoru (Butterworth Scientific, 2021)
    Food Control 130: 108336
    We ask how European food law impacts the transformative potential of alternative proteins, including single-cell proteins, plant-based novel proteins, cultured meat,macroalgae, and insects. The Novel Food Regulation may prove insurmountable for small companies, and it is demanding and time-consuming even for larger companies,dampening the transformative potential of all novel foods and traditional foods from third countries. Several microalgae and macroalgae are non-novel in the EU, which eases their way into the markets. The unclear novel food status of some potential green macroalgae species is a hindrance. All insects are novel, and none has EU-level authorization yet, although some Member States allow insect food. The GM Food Regulation is procedurally and scientifically demanding, and it forces GM labelling. The Regulation dampens the transformative potential of food GM technology. In addition to crops and fruit, GM Food Regulation applies to genetically modified or edited microbes,microalgae, cultured meat, and insects. The naming and labelling rules of plant-based products have caused controversy. From the business perspective, the health claims process is similarly challenging as the novel food process. EU food law must guarantee food safety and consumer rights while applying the principles of nondiscrimination and proportionality.
  • Sörenson, Eva; Bertos-Fortis, Mireia; Farnelid, Hanna; Kremp, Anke; Krüger, Karen; Lindehoff, Elin; Legrand, Catherine (Wiley & Sons, 2019)
    Environmental Microbiology Reports, 11: 425-433
    Phytoplankton and bacteria interactions have a significant role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Associations can range from mutualistic to parasitic, shaping biogeochemical cycles and having a direct influence on phytoplankton growth. How variations in phenotype and sampling location, affect the phytoplankton microbiome is largely unknown. A high-resolution characterization of the bacterial community in cultures of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium was performed on strains isolated from different geographical locations and at varying anthropogenic impact levels. Microbiomes of Baltic Sea Alexandrium ostenfeldii isolates were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and were consistent over phenotypic and genotypic Alexandrium strain variation, resulting in identification of an A. ostenfeldii core microbiome. Comparisons with in situ bacterial communities showed that taxa found in this A. ostenfeldii core were specifically associated to dinoflagellate dynamics in the Baltic Sea. Microbiomes of Alexandrium tamarense and minutum, isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, differed from those of A. ostenfeldii in bacterial diversity and composition but displayed high consistency, and a core set of bacterial taxa was identified. This indicates that Alexandrium isolates with diverse phenotypes host predictable, species-specific, core microbiomes reflecting the abiotic conditions from which they were isolated. These findings enable in-depth studies of potential interactions occurring between Alexandrium and specific bacterial taxa.
  • Vuorio, Kristiina; Mäki, Anita; Salmi, Pauliina; Aalto, Sanni L.; Tiirola, Marja (Frontiers Media S.A., 2020)
    Frontiers in Microbiology 11 (2020) 96
    The composition of phytoplankton community is the basis for environmental monitoring and assessment of the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Community composition studies of phytoplankton have been based on time-consuming and expertise-demanding light microscopy analyses. Molecular methods have the potential to replace microscopy, but the high copy number variation of ribosomal genes and the lack of universal primers for simultaneous amplification of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes complicate data interpretation. In this study, we used our previously developed directional primer-independent high-throughput sequencing (HTS) approach to analyze 16S and 18S rRNA community structures. Comparison of 83 boreal lake samples showed that the relative abundances of eukaryotic phytoplankton at class level and prokaryotic cyanobacteria at order level were consistent between HTS and microscopy results. At the genus level, the results had low correspondence, mainly due to lack of sequences in the reference library. HTS was superior to identify genera that are extensively represented in the reference databases but lack specific morphological characteristics. Targeted metatranscriptomics proved to be a feasible method to complement the microscopy analysis. The metatranscriptomics can also be applied without linking the sequences to taxonomy. However, direct indexing of the sequences to their environmental indicator values needs collections of more comprehensive sample sets, as long as the coverage of molecular barcodes of eukaryotic species remains insufficient.
  • Lähteenmäki-Uutela, Anu; Rahikainen, Moona; Camarena-Gómez, María Teresa; Piiparinen, Jonna; Spilling, Kristian; Yang, Baoru (Springer Nature, 2021)
    Aquaculture International 29 (2021), 487–509
    Macroalgae-based products are increasing in demand also in Europe. In the European Union, each category of macroalgae-based products is regulated separately. We discuss EU legislation, including the law on medicinal products, foods including food supplements and food additives, feed and feed additives, cosmetics, packaging materials, fertilizers and biostimulants, as well as biofuels. Product safety and consumer protection are the priorities with any new products. Macroalgae products can be sold as traditional herbal medicines. The novel food regulation applies to macroalgae foods that have not previously been used as food, and organic macroalgae are a specific regulatory category. The maximum levels of heavy metals may be a barrier for macroalgae foods, feeds, and fertilizers. Getting health claims approved for foods based on macroalgae is demanding. In addition to the rules on products, the macroalgae business is strongly impacted by the elements of the general regulatory environment such as agricultural/aquacultural subsidies, maritime spatial planning and aquaculture licensing, public procurement criteria, tax schemes, and trade agreements.
  • Kraft, Kaisa; Seppälä, Jukka; Hällfors, Heidi; Suikkanen, Sanna; Ylöstalo, Pasi; Anglès, Sílvia; Kielosto, Sami; Kuosa, Harri; Laakso, Lauri; Honkanen, Martti; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Oja, Johanna; Tamminen, Timo (Frontiers Media S.A., 2021)
    Frontiers in Marine Science 8: 594144
    Cyanobacteria are an important part of phytoplankton communities, however, they are also known for forming massive blooms with potentially deleterious effects on recreational use, human and animal health, and ecosystem functioning. Emerging high-frequency imaging flow cytometry applications, such as Imaging FlowCytobot (IFCB), are crucial in furthering our understanding of the factors driving bloom dynamics, since these applications provide community composition information at frequencies impossible to attain using conventional monitoring methods. However, the proof of applicability of automated imaging applications for studying dynamics of filamentous cyanobacteria is still scarce. In this study we present the first results of IFCB applied to a Baltic Sea cyanobacterial bloom community using a continuous flow-through setup. Our main aim was to demonstrate the pros and cons of the IFCB in identifying filamentous cyanobacterial taxa and in estimating their biomass. Selected environmental parameters (water temperature, wind speed and salinity) were included, in order to demonstrate the dynamics of the system the cyanobacteria occur in and the possibilities for analyzing high-frequency phytoplankton observations against changes in the environment. In order to compare the IFCB results with conventional monitoring methods, filamentous cyanobacteria were enumerated from water samples using light microscopical analysis. Two common bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea, Aphanizomenon flosaquae and Dolichospermum spp. dominated the bloom, followed by an increase in Oscillatoriales abundance. The IFCB results compared well with the results of the light microscopical analysis, especially in the case of Dolichospermum. Aphanizomenon biomass varied slightly between the methods and the Oscillatoriales results deviated the most. Bloom formation was initiated as water temperature increased to over 15°C and terminated as the wind speed increased, dispersing the bloom. Community shifts were closely related to movements of the water mass. We demonstrate how using a high-frequency imaging flow cytometry application can help understand the development of cyanobacteria summer blooms.
  • Truchy, Amélie; Sarremejane, Romain; Muotka, Timo; Mykrä, Heikki; Angeler, David G.; Lehosmaa, Kaisa; Huusko, Ari; Johnson, Richard K.; Sponseller, Ryan A.; McKie, Brendan G. (Wiley, 2020)
    Global Change Biology 26 6 (2020)
    Ongoing climate change is increasing the occurrence and intensity of drought episodes worldwide, including in boreal regions not previously regarded as drought prone, and where the impacts of drought remain poorly understood. Ecological connectivity is one factor that might influence community structure and ecosystem functioning post-drought, by facilitating the recovery of sensitive species via dispersal at both local (e.g. a nearby habitat patch) and regional (from other systems within the same region) scales. In an outdoor mesocosm experiment, we investigated how impacts of drought on boreal stream ecosystems are altered by the spatial arrangement of local habitat patches within stream channels, and variation in ecological connectivity with a regional species pool. We measured basal ecosystem processes underlying carbon and nutrient cycling: (a) algal biomass accrual; (b) microbial respiration; and (c) decomposition of organic matter, and sampled communities of aquatic fungi and benthic invertebrates. An 8-day drought event had strong impacts on both community structure and ecosystem functioning, including algal accrual, leaf decomposition and microbial respiration, with many of these impacts persisting even after water levels had been restored for 3.5 weeks. Enhanced connectivity with the regional species pool and increased aggregation of habitat patches also affected multiple response variables, especially those associated with microbes, and in some cases reduced the effects of drought to a small extent. This indicates that spatial processes might play a role in the resilience of communities and ecosystem functioning, given enough time. These effects were however insufficient to facilitate significant recovery in algal growth before seasonal dieback began in autumn. The limited resilience of ecosystem functioning in our experiment suggests that even short-term droughts can have extended consequences for stream ecosystems in the world's vast boreal region, and especially on the ecosystem processes and services mediated by algal biofilms.
  • Karlson, Bengt; Andersen, Per; Arneborg, Lars; Cembella, Allan; Eikrem, Wenche; John, Uwe; West, Jennifer Joy; Klemm, Kerstin; Kobos, Justyna; Lehtinen, Sirpa; Lundholm, Nina; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Naustvoll, Lars; Poelman, Marnix; Provoost, Pieter; De Rijcke, Maarten; Suikkanen, Sanna (Elsevier, 2021)
    Harmful Algae 102 (2021), 101989
    Harmful algal blooms (HAB) are recurrent phenomena in northern Europe along the coasts of the Baltic Sea, Kattegat-Skagerrak, eastern North Sea, Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. These HABs have caused occasional massive losses for the aquaculture industry and have chronically affected socioeconomic interests in several ways. This status review gives an overview of historical HAB events and summarises reports to the Harmful Algae Event Database from 1986 to the end of year 2019 and observations made in long term monitoring programmes of potentially harmful phytoplankton and of phycotoxins in bivalve shellfish. Major HAB taxa causing fish mortalities in the region include blooms of the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina leadbeateri in northern Norway in 1991 and 2019, resulting in huge economic losses for fish farmers. A bloom of the prymesiophyte Prymnesium polylepis (syn. Chrysochromulina polylepis) in the Kattegat-Skagerrak in 1988 was ecosystem disruptive. Blooms of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis spp. have caused accumulations of foam on beaches in the southwestern North Sea and Wadden Sea coasts and shellfish mortality has been linked to their occurrence. Mortality of shellfish linked to HAB events has been observed in estuarine waters associated with influx of water from the southern North Sea. The first bloom of the dictyochophyte genus Pseudochattonella was observed in 1998, and since then such blooms have been observed in high cell densities in spring causing fish mortalities some years. Dinoflagellates, primarily Dinophysis spp., intermittently yield concentrations of Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins (DST) in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, above regulatory limits along the coasts of Norway, Denmark and the Swedish west coast. On average, DST levels in shellfish have decreased along the Swedish and Norwegian Skagerrak coasts since approximately 2006, coinciding with a decrease in the cell abundance of D. acuta. Among dinoflagellates, Alexandrium species are the major source of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST) in the region. PST concentrations above regulatory levels were rare in the Skagerrak-Kattegat during the three decadal review period, but frequent and often abundant findings of Alexandrium resting cysts in surface sediments indicate a high potential risk for blooms. PST levels often above regulatory limits along the west coast of Norway are associated with A. catenella (ribotype Group 1) as the main toxin producer. Other Alexandrium species, such as A. ostenfeldii and A. minutum, are capable of producing PST among some populations but are usually not associated with PSP events in the region. The cell abundance of A. pseudogonyaulax, a producer of the ichthyotoxin goniodomin (GD), has increased in the Skagerrak-Kattegat since 2010, and may constitute an emerging threat. The dinoflagellate Azadinium spp. have been unequivocally linked to the presence of azaspiracid toxins (AZT) responsible for Azaspiracid Shellfish Poisoning (AZP) in northern Europe. These toxins were detected in bivalve shellfish at concentrations above regulatory limits for the first time in Norway in blue mussels in 2005 and in Sweden in blue mussels and oysters (Ostrea edulis and Crassostrea gigas) in 2018. Certain members of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia produce the neurotoxin domoic acid and analogs known as Amnesic Shellfish Toxins (AST). Blooms of Pseudo-nitzschia were common in the North Sea and the Skagerrak-Kattegat, but levels of AST in bivalve shellfish were rarely above regulatory limits during the review period. Summer cyanobacteria blooms in the Baltic Sea are a concern mainly for tourism by causing massive fouling of bathing water and beaches. Some of the cyanobacteria produce toxins, e.g. Nodularia spumigena, producer of nodularin, which may be a human health problem and cause occasional dog mortalities. Coastal and shelf sea regions in northern Europe provide a key supply of seafood, socioeconomic well-being and ecosystem services. Increasing anthropogenic influence and climate change create environmental stressors causing shifts in the biogeography and intensity of HABs. Continued monitoring of HAB and phycotoxins and the operation of historical databases such as HAEDAT provide not only an ongoing status report but also provide a way to interpret causes and mechanisms of HABs.
  • Janssen, Annette B. G.; Janse, Jan H.; Beusen, Arthur H. W.; Chang, Manqi; Harrison, John A.; Huttunen, Inese; Kong, Xiangzhen; Rost, Jasmijn; Teurlincx, Sven; Troost, Tineke A.; van Wijk, Dianneke; Mooij, Wolf M. (Elsevier, 2019)
    Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 36 (2019), 1-10
    Algal blooms increasingly threaten lake and reservoir water quality at the global scale, caused by ongoing climate change and nutrient loading. To anticipate these algal blooms, models to project future algal blooms worldwide are required. Here we present the state-of-the-art in algal projection modelling and explore the requirements of an ideal algal projection model. Based on this, we identify current challenges and opportunities for such model development. Since most building blocks are present, we foresee that algal projection models for any lake on earth can be developed in the near future. Finally, we think that algal bloom projection models at a global scale will provide a valuable contribution to global policymaking, in particular with respect to SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation).
  • Taipale, Sami J.; Kuoppamäki, Kirsi; Strandberg, Ursula; Peltomaa, Elina; Vuorio, Kristiina (SpringerLink, 2020)
    Hydrobiologia 847 21 (2020)
    Food quality is one of the key factors influencing zooplankton population dynamics. Eutrophication drives phytoplankton communities toward the dominance of cyanobacteria, which means a decrease in the availability of sterols and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The effects of different restoration measures on the nutritional quality of the phytoplankton community and subsequent impacts on zooplankton biomass have rarely been considered. We analyzed the nutritional quality of phytoplankton in the eutrophic Lake Vesijärvi in southern Finland over a 37-year period, and studied the impacts of two restoration measures, biomanipulation and hypolimnetic aeration, on the abundance of high-quality phytoplankton. We found that biomanipulation had a positive impact on the abundance of taxa synthesizing sterols, EPA, and DHA and, concurrently, on the biomass of the keystone species Daphnia. In contrast, hypolimnetic aeration did not result in such a beneficial outcome, manifested as a decrease in the abundance of Daphnia and frequent phytoplankton blooms dominated by cyanobacteria suggesting reduction in the nutritional quality of food for Daphnia. Our analysis shows that the determination of the nutritional value of algae and the contribution of essential fatty acids and sterols is an effective method to evaluate the success of various restoration measures.
  • Campbell, Karley; Matero, Ilkka; Bellas, Christopher; Turpin-Jelfs, Thomas; Anhaus, Philipp; Graeve, Martin; Fripiat, Francois; Tranter, Martyn; Landy, Jack Christopher; Sanchez-Baracaldo, Patricia; Leu, Eva; Katlein, Christian; Mundy, C. J; Rysgaard, Søren; Tedesco, Letizia; Haas, Christian; Nicolaus, Marcel (Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, 2022)
    Ambio
    Sea ice continues to decline across many regions of the Arctic, with remaining ice becoming increasingly younger and more dynamic. These changes alter the habitats of microbial life that live within the sea ice, which support healthy functioning of the marine ecosystem and provision of resources for human-consumption, in addition to influencing biogeochemical cycles (e.g. air–sea CO2 exchange). With the susceptibility of sea ice ecosystems to climate change, there is a pressing need to fill knowledge gaps surrounding sea ice habitats and their microbial communities. Of fundamental importance to this goal is the development of new methodologies that permit effective study of them. Based on outcomes from the DiatomARCTIC project, this paper integrates existing knowledge with case studies to provide insight on how to best document sea ice microbial communities, which contributes to the sustainable use and protection of Arctic marine and coastal ecosystems in a time of environmental change.
  • Zhang, You; Cheng, Long; Li, Kuanyi; Zhang, Lu; Cai, Yongjiu; Wang, Xiaolong; Heino, Jani (2019)
    Limnology and Oceanography 64 (3): 1047-1058
    Eutrophication alters the trophic dynamics in lakes and may result in biotic homogenization. How nutrient enrichment drives patterns of taxonomic and functional (i.e., trait‐based) homogenization of macroinvertebrate assemblages at within‐lake (local) and among‐lake (regional) scales is, however, not well understood. Taxonomic and functional compositions of macroinvertebrate assemblages in 41 lakes of the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and Huaihe River were analyzed at within‐lake and among‐lake scales. Our results indicated that there was a significant difference in macroinvertebrate assemblages among lakes under different trophic status, and that total phosphorus was the major environmental factor that regulated both taxonomic and functional beta diversity of macroinvertebrate assemblages. That the abundances of pollution‐tolerant species (e.g., Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri and Microchironomus tabarui) increased with trophic state contributed the most to among‐lake dissimilarity. Functional beta diversity was significantly positively correlated with taxonomic beta diversity, while functional beta diversity was on average lower than taxonomic beta diversity. A combination of univariate and multivariate techniques revealed that nutrient enrichment homogenized taxonomic and functional diversity of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in shallow lakes at within‐lake and among‐lake scales, and that there was an overall trend toward taxonomic homogenization that exceeded the trend of functional homogenization. Thus, taxonomic and functional compositions should be considered simultaneously to improve understanding of the response of aquatic communities to anthropogenic disturbance, as the loss and gain of species may be influenced by species‐specific features, and functional composition may exhibit a relatively high correspondence with changes in environmental conditions.
  • Salmi, Pauliina; Eskelinen, Matti A.; Leppänen, Matti T.; Pölönen, Ilkka (MDPI AG, 2021)
    Plants 2021, 10(2), 341
    Spectral cameras are traditionally used in remote sensing of microalgae, but increasingly also in laboratory-scale applications, to study and monitor algae biomass in cultures. Practical and cost-efficient protocols for collecting and analyzing hyperspectral data are currently needed. The purpose of this study was to test a commercial, easy-to-use hyperspectral camera to monitor the growth of different algae strains in liquid samples. Indices calculated from wavebands from transmission imaging were compared against algae abundance and wet biomass obtained from an electronic cell counter, chlorophyll a concentration, and chlorophyll fluorescence. A ratio of selected wavebands containing near-infrared and red turned out to be a powerful index because it was simple to calculate and interpret, yet it yielded strong correlations to abundances strain-specifically (0.85 < r < 0.96, p < 0.001). When all the indices formulated as A/B, A/(A + B) or (A − B)/(A + B), where A and B were wavebands of the spectral camera, were scrutinized, good correlations were found amongst them for biomass of each strain (0.66 < r < 0.98, p < 0.001). Comparison of near-infrared/red index to chlorophyll a concentration demonstrated that small-celled strains had higher chlorophyll absorbance compared to strains with larger cells. The comparison of spectral imaging to chlorophyll fluorescence was done for one strain of green algae and yielded strong correlations (near-infrared/red, r = 0.97, p < 0.001). Consequently, we described a simple imaging setup and information extraction based on vegetation indices that could be used to monitor algae cultures.
  • Turunen, Jarno; Elbrecht, Vasco; Steinke, Dirk; Aroviita, Jukka (Blackwell Scientific, 2021)
    Freshwater Biology 66: 4, 785-798
    1. Riparian forests are commonly advocated as a key management option to mitigate the effects of agriculture on headwater stream biodiversity and ecosystem func tions. However, the benefits of riparian forests might be reduced by uninterrupted catchment-scale pollution. 2. We studied the effects of riparian land use on multiple ecological endpoints in head water streams in an agricultural landscape. We studied stream habitat characteristics, water temperature and algal accrual, and macrophyte, benthic macroinvertebrate and fish communities in 11 paired forested and open agricultural headwater stream reaches that differed in their extent of riparian forest cover but had similar water quality. 3. Hydromorphological habitat quality was higher in forested reaches than in open reaches. Riparian forest had a strong effect on the summer water temperature regime, with maximum and mean water temperatures and temperature variation in forested reaches substantially lower than in open reaches. 4. Macrophyte communities differed between forested and open reaches. The mean abundance of bryophytes was higher in forested reaches but the difference to open reaches was only marginally significant, whereas graminoids were significantly more abundant in open reaches. Within-stream dissimilarity of benthic macroinvertebrate community structure was significantly related to the difference in riparian land use between reach pairs. The relative DNA sequence abundance of pollution-sensitive Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera species tended to be higher in forested reaches than in open reaches. Finally, fish densities were not significantly different be tween forested and open reaches, although densities were higher in forested reaches. 5. This unequivocal evidence for the ecological benefits of forested riparian reaches in agricultural headwater streams suggests that riparian forest can partly mitigate the adverse impacts of agricultural diffuse pollution on biota. The strong effect of forests on stream water temperature suggest that riparian forest could also miti gate harmful effects on headwater stream biodiversity and ecosystem functions of the predicted more frequent high summer temperatures.
  • Taipale, Sami J.; Hiltunen, Minna; Vuorio, Kristiina; Peltomaa, Elina (2016)
    The composition and abundance of phytoplankton is an important factor defining ecological status of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Chemotaxonomic markers (e.g., pigments and fatty acids) are needed for monitoring changes in a phytoplankton community and to know the nutritional quality of seston for herbivorous zooplankton. Here we investigated the suitability of sterols along with fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers using multivariate statistics, by analyzing the sterol and fatty acid composition of 10 different phytoplankton classes including altogether 37 strains isolated from freshwater lakes. We were able to detect a total of 47 fatty acids and 29 sterols in our phytoplankton samples, which both differed statistically significantly between phytoplankton classes. Due to the high variation of fatty acid composition among Cyanophyceae, taxonomical differentiation increased when Cyanophyceae were excluded from statistical analysis. Sterol composition was more heterogeneous within class than fatty acids and did not improve separation of phytoplankton classes when used alongside fatty acids. However, we conclude that sterols can provide additional information on the abundance of specific genera within a class which can be generated by using fatty acids. For example, whereas high C-16 omega-3 PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) indicates the presence of Chlorophyceae, a simultaneous high amount of ergosterol could specify the presence of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae). Additionally, we found specific 4 alpha-methyl sterols for distinct Dinophyceae genera, suggesting that 4a-methyl sterols can potentially separate freshwater dinoflagellates from each other.
  • Huovinen, Lena (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Lake ecosystems are shaped by water chemistry processes that affect the lake environment and the species communities within. Changes in the water chemistry thus have far-reaching consequences. Water colour is one variable that affects water chemistry and stems from humic substances in the water. Dark water reduces light availability and also affects nutrient and oxygen availability. A trend of brownification of freshwater systems has been observed in recent years and it is expected to influence species community’s diversity and composition. The aim of this thesis was to study whether brownification is an ongoing issue in the study lakes and whether it has had a negative effect on phytoplankton diversity and resulted in shifts in the phytoplankton composition. A data set including about a 100 lakes in Finland with measurements from 1965 up until now served as the study system which was analysed with statistical methods. The results indicated a brownification trend in the past decades. The brownification so far had a positive impact on species richness but a negative impact on beta diversity. Brownification also affected species composition. Flagellates and autotrophic species increased in darker waters but mixotrophic species that are known to dominate in dark water colour, did not show a clear increase with water colour. Other hydrological variables than water colour could have had a bigger impact on the phytoplankton community than water colour but future monitoring of the phytoplankton community is recommended to see if water colour will have a negative impact on species diversity in the future.