Browsing by Subject "allergy"

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  • Vakkilainen, Svetlana; Mäkitie, Riikka; Klemetti, Paula; Valta, Helena; Taskinen, Mervi; Husebye, Eystein Sverre; Mäkitie, Outi (2018)
    Background: Mutations in RMRP, encoding a non-coding RNA molecule, underlie cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), a syndromic immunodeficiency with multiple pathogenetic mechanisms and variable phenotype. Allergy and asthma have been reported in the CHH population and some patients suffer from autoimmune (AI) diseases. Objective: We explored AI and allergic manifestations in a large cohort of Finnish patients with CHH and correlated clinical features with laboratory parameters and autoantibodies. Methods: We collected clinical and laboratory data from patient interviews and hospital records. Serum samples were tested for a range of autoantibodies including celiac, anti-cytokine, and anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies. Nasal cytology samples were analyzed with microscopy. Results: The study cohort included 104 patients with genetically confirmed CHH; their median age was 39.2 years (range 0.6-73.6). Clinical autoimmunity was common (11/104, 10.6%) and included conditions previously undescribed in subjects with CHH (narcolepsy, psoriasis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and multifocal motor axonal neuropathy). Patients with autoimmunity more often had recurrent pneumonia, sepsis, high immunoglobulin (Ig) E and/or undetectable IgA levels. The mortality rates were higher in subjects with AI diseases (X-(2)(2) = 14.056, p = 0.0002). Several patients demonstrated serum autoantibody positivity without compatible symptoms. We confirmed the high prevalence of asthma (23%) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (39%). Gastrointestinal complaints, mostly persistent diarrhea, were also frequently reported (32/104, 31%). Despite the history of allergic rhinitis, no eosinophils were observed in nasal cytology in five tested patients. Conclusions: AI diseases are common in Finnish patients with CHH and are associated with higher mortality, recurrent pneumonia, sepsis, high IgE and/or undetectable IgA levels. Serum positivity for some autoantibodies was not associated with clinical autoimmunity. The high prevalence of persistent diarrhea, asthma, and symptoms of inflammation of nasal mucosa may indicate common pathways of immune dysregulation.
  • PASTURE EFRAIM Study Grp; Metzler, Stefanie; Frei, Remo; Schmausser-Hechfellner, Elisabeth; Pekkanen, Juha; Karvonen, Anne M.; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Roduit, Caroline (2019)
    Background: Allergies are a serious public health issue, and prevalences are rising worldwide. The role of antibiotics in the development of allergies has repeatedly been discussed, as results remain inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between pre-and post-natal antibiotic exposure and subsequent development of allergies (atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma, atopic sensitization and allergic rhinitis). Methods: A total of 1080 children who participated in a European birth cohort study (PASTURE) were included in this analysis. Data on antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and/or first year of life and allergic diseases were collected by questionnaires from pregnancy up to 6 years of age and analysed by performing logistic regressions. To take into account reverse causation, we included models, where children with diagnosis or symptoms of the respective disease in the first year of life were excluded. Results: Antibiotic exposure in utero was significantly and positively associated with atopic dermatitis and food allergy. The strongest effect was on diseases with onset within the first year of life (for atopic dermatitis: aOR 1.66, 95% CI 1.11-2.48 and for food allergy: aOR 3.01, 95% CI 1.22-7.47). Antibiotics in the first year of life were positively associated with atopic dermatitis up to 4 years (aOR 2.73, 95% CI 1.66-4.49) and also suggested a dose-response relationship. A tendency was observed with asthma between 3 and 6 years (aOR 1.65, 95% CI 0.95-2.86). Conclusions: Our findings show positive associations between exposure to antibiotics and allergies, mainly atopic dermatitis and food allergy within the first year of life, after prenatal exposure, and atopic dermatitis and asthma after post-natal exposure to antibiotics in children born in rural settings.
  • Pfaller, Birgit; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José; Agache, Ioana; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Alsalamah, Mohammad; Bavbek, Sevim; Bossios, Apostolos; Boyman, Onur; Chaker, Adam; Chan, Susan; Chatzipetrou, Alexia; du Toit, George; Jutel, Marek; Kauppi, Paula; Kolios, Antonios; Li, Carmen; Matucci, Andrea; Marson, Alanna; Bendien, Sarah; Palomares, Oscar; Rogala, Barbara; Szepfalusi, Zsolt; Untersmayr, Eva; Vultaggio, Alessandra; Eiwegger, Thomas (2021)
    Abstract Biologicals have transformed the management of severe disease phenotypes in asthma, atopic dermatitis, and chronic spontaneous urticaria. As a result, the number of approved biologicals for the treatment of atopic diseases is continuously increasing. Although atopic diseases are among the most common diseases in the reproductive age, investigations, and information on half-life, pharmacokinetics defining the neonatal Fc receptors (FcRn) and most important safety of biologicals in pregnancy are lacking. Given the complex sequence of immunological events that regulate conception, fetal development, and the intrauterine and postnatal maturation of the immune system, this information is of utmost importance. We conducted a systematic review on biologicals in pregnancy for indications of atopic diseases. Evidence in this field is scare and mainly reserved to reports on the usage of omalizumab. This lack of evidence demands the establishment of a multidisciplinary approach for the management of pregnant women who receive biologicals and multicenter registries for long-term follow-up, drug trial designs suitable for women in the reproductive age, and better experimental models that represent the human situation. Due to the very long half-life of biologicals, pre-conception counseling, and health care provider education is crucial to offer the best care for mother and fetus. This position paper integrates available data on safety of biologicals during pregnancy in atopic diseases via a systematic review with a detailed review on immunological considerations how inhibition of different pathways may impact pregnancy.
  • Lätti, Anne M.; Pekkanen, Juha; Koskela, Heikki O. (2018)
    Objectives Chronic cough is linked to various long-standing risk factors like asthma, chronic rhinitis and oesophageal reflux disease. On the contrary, acute and subacute cough are usually considered to be caused by acute respiratory infections. Little is known about the possible long-standing risk factors for acute and subacute cough. In this study, we have identified the long-standing risk factors for acute, subacute and chronic cough in order to identify the risk factors specifically associated with chronic cough.Design A comprehensive 80-item questionnaire was sent via email to the participants.Setting A community-based study to all public service employees of two towns in central Finland.Participants There were 13 980 employees, of them 3697 responded (26.4%). Among the responders, there were 199 subjects with current daily acute cough (duration <3 weeks, prevalence 5.4%), 126 subjects with current daily subacute cough (duration 3–8 weeks, prevalence 3.4%) and 267 subjects with current daily chronic cough (duration >8 weeks, prevalence 7.2%).Primary outcome measures The risk factors that associated with each cough subtype. The subjects without any cough formed the reference group.Results Several risk factors were associated with both short and long cough subtypes namely family history of chronic cough, moisture damage exposure and number of reported somatic symptoms. Furthermore, allergy was associated with acute and subacute cough. Current asthma and chronic rhinitis were associated with subacute and chronic cough. Oesophageal reflux disease and advanced age were associated with chronic cough.Conclusions The specific risk factors for chronic cough were oesophageal reflux disease and advanced age. Acute and subacute cough should not be regarded merely as symptoms of acute respiratory infections but possible manifestations of long-standing risk factors. A new risk factor for all cough types was family history of chronic cough.
  • Diabimmune Study Grp; Schmidt, Felicitas; Hose, Alexander J.; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Ege, Markus J. (2019)
    Background: The prevalence of atopy is associated with a Western lifestyle, as shown by studies comparing neighboring regions with different socioeconomic backgrounds. Atopy might reflect various conditions differing in their susceptibility to environmental factors. Objective: We sought to define phenotypes of atopic sensitization in early childhood and examine their association with allergic diseases and hereditary background in Finland and Estonia. Methods: The analysis included 1603 Finnish and 1657 Estonian children from the DIABIMMUNE multicenter young children cohort. Specific IgE levels were measured at age 3, 4, and 5 years, respectively, and categorized into 3 CAP classes. Latent class analysis was performed with the statistical software package poLCA in R software. Results: Both populations differed in terms of socioeconomic status and environmental determinants, such as pet ownership, farm-related exposure, time spent playing outdoors, and prevalence of allergic diseases (all P Conclusion: Despite profound differences in environmental exposures, there might exist genuine patterns of atopic sensitization. The distribution of these patterns might determine the contribution of atopic sensitization to disease onset.
  • Prescott, Susan L.; Hancock, Trevor; Bland, Jeffrey; van den Bosch, Matilda; Jansson, Janet K.; Johnson, Christine C.; Kondo, Michelle; Katz, David; Kort, Remco; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Logan, Alan C.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Nanan, Ralph; Poland, Blake; Robinson, Jake; Schroeck, Nicholas; Sinkkonen, Aki; Springmann, Marco; Wright, Robert O.; Wegienka, Ganesa (2019)
    inVIVO Planetary Health (inVIVO) is a progressive scientific movement providing evidence, advocacy, and inspiration to align the interests and vitality of people, place, and planet. Our goal is to transform personal and planetary health through awareness, attitudes, and actions, and a deeper understanding of how all systems are interconnected and interdependent. Here, we present the abstracts and proceedings of our 8th annual conference, held in Detroit, Michigan in May 2019, themed "From Challenges, to Opportunities". Our far-ranging discussions addressed the complex interdependent ecological challenges of advancing global urbanization, including the biopsychosocial interactions in our living environment on physical, mental, and spiritual wellbeing, together with the wider community and societal factors that govern these. We had a strong solutions focus, with diverse strategies spanning from urban-greening and renewal, nature-relatedness, nutritional ecology, planetary diets, and microbiome rewilding, through to initiatives for promoting resilience, positive emotional assets, traditional cultural narratives, creativity, art projects for personal and community health, and exploring ways of positively shifting mindsets and value systems. Our cross-sectoral agenda underscored the importance and global impact of local initiatives everywhere by contributing to new normative values as part of a global interconnected grass-roots movement for planetary health.
  • Kujansuu, Eila; Kujansuu, Leena; Paassilta, Marita; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaarala, Outi (2019)
    Background The hygiene hypothesis suggests that a decreased microbial load contributes to an increased risk of allergies. In the Finnish municipality of Nokia, sewage water was accidentally mixed with drinking water for 2 days. We studied the association between exposure and the emergence of allergies in children. Methods Children aged 2-5 years living in the accident area and an age-matched cohort from the control municipality were recruited. Based on the questionnaires, we identified 139 children exposed to the contaminated water and selected age- and sex-matched controls for them (mean age 16.59 months at the time of the accident). Allergic symptoms and diseases were recorded by ISAAC questionnaires and skin prick tests (SPTs) performed 2 and 5 years after the accident. Results SPT positivity at 5 years of follow-up was decreased in the children exposed to the sewage water below 1 year of age (OR 0.311, 95% CI 0.118-0.820; P = 0.019), particularly in children who did not develop gastroenteritis at exposure. In contrast, the children over 1 year of age at the exposure tended more likely to be SPT-positive at 5 years of follow-up (OR 1.997, 95% CI 0.963-4.143; P = 0.070). Conclusions Sewage water exposure during the first year of life, but not later, decreased the risk of IgE sensitization emphasizing the importance of age as a modulator. The modulation of IgE sensitization by the presence of clinical gastroenteritis at the exposure suggests that the nature of microbial load may have importance or alternatively shared host defense mechanisms protect from infection and atopic sensitization.
  • Haahtela, Tari; Alenius, Harri; Lehtimäki, Jenni; Sinkkonen, Aki; Fyhrquist, Nanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Ruokolainen, Lasse; Mäkelä, Mika J. (European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology & John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2021)
    Allergy
    Increase of allergic conditions has occurred at the same pace with the Great Acceleration, which stands for the rapid growth rate of human activities upon earth from 1950s. Changes of environment and lifestyle along with escalating urbanization are acknowledged as the main underlying causes. Secondary (tertiary) prevention for better disease control has advanced considerably with innovations for oral immunotherapy and effective treatment of inflammation with corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and biological medications. Patients are less disabled than before. However, primary prevention has remained a dilemma. Factors predicting allergy and asthma risk have proven complex: Risk factors increase the risk, while protective factors counteract them. Interaction of human body with environmental biodiversity with micro-organisms and biogenic compounds as well as the central role of epigenetic adaptation in immune homeostasis have given new insight. Allergic diseases are good indicators of the twisted relation to environment. In various non-communicable diseases, the protective mode of the immune system indicates low-grade inflammation without apparent cause. Giving microbes, pro- and prebiotics, has shown some promise in prevention and treatment. The real-world public health programme in Finland (2008–2018) emphasized nature relatedness and protective factors for immunological resilience, instead of avoidance. The nationwide action mitigated the allergy burden, but in the lack of controls, primary preventive effect remains to be proven. The first results of controlled biodiversity interventions are promising. In the fast urbanizing world, new approaches are called for allergy prevention, which also has a major cost saving potential.
  • Diabimmune Study Grp; Korhonen, Laura; Oikarinen, Sami; Lehtonen, Jussi; Mustonen, Neea; Tyni, Iiris; Niemelä, Onni; Honkanen, Hanna; Huhtala, Heini; Ilonen, Jorma; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Lönnrot, Maria; Hyöty, Heikki; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Koski, Katriina; Kiviniemi, Minna; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Kondrashova, Anita (2019)
    Previous data about the role of viruses in the development of allergic immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization are contradictory. The aim of this study was to determine the possible associations between exposure to different viruses (rhinovirus, enterovirus, norovirus, and parechovirus) during the first year of life and IgE sensitization. Viruses were analyzed from stool samples collected monthly from infants participating in a prospective birth cohort study. From that study, 244 IgE sensitized case children and 244 nonsensitized control children were identified based on their allergen-specific IgE antibody levels at the age of 6, 18, and 36 months. Stool samples (n = 4576) from the case and control children were screened for the presence of rhinovirus, enterovirus, norovirus, and parechovirus RNA by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The study showed that rhinovirus was the most prevalent virus detected, present in 921 (20%) samples. None of the viruses were associated with IgE sensitization in the full cohort but after stratifying by sex, the number of rhinovirus positive samples was inversely associated with IgE sensitization in boys (odds ratio [OR]: 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.94; P = 0.006). There was also a temporal relation between rhinoviruses and IgE sensitization, as rhinovirus exposure during the first 6 months of life was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent IgE sensitization in boys (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.6-0.94; P = 0.016). In conclusion, early exposure to rhinoviruses was inversely associated with IgE sensitization but this protective association was restricted to boys.
  • Lehtimaki, Jenni; Sinkko, Hanna; Hielm-Bjorkman, Anna; Salmela, Elina; Tiira, Katriina; Laatikainen, Tiina; Mäkelainen, Sanna; Kaukonen, Maria; Uusitalo, Liisa; Hanski, Ilkka; Lohi, Hannes; Ruokolainen, Lasse (2018)
    A rural environment and farming lifestyle are known to provide protection against allergic diseases. This protective effect is expected to be mediated via exposure to environmental microbes that are needed to support a normal immune tolerance. However, the triangle of interactions between environmental microbes, host microbiota, and immune system remains poorly understood. Here, we have studied these interactions using a canine model (two breeds, n = 169), providing an intermediate approach between complex human studies and artificial mouse model studies. We show that the skin microbiota reflects both the living environment and the lifestyle of a dog. Remarkably, the prevalence of spontaneous allergies is also associated with residential environment and lifestyle, such that allergies are most common among urban dogs living in single-person families without other animal contacts, and least common among rural dogs having opposite lifestyle features. Thus, we show that living environment and lifestyle concurrently associate with skin microbiota and allergies, suggesting that these factorsmight be causally related. Moreover, microbes commonly found on human skin tend to dominate the urban canine skin microbiota, while environmental microbes are rich in the rural canine skin microbiota. This in turn suggests that skin microbiota is a feasible indicator of exposure to environmental microbes. As short-term exposure to environmental microbes via exercise is not associated with allergies, we conclude that prominent and sustained exposure to environmental microbiotas should be promoted by urban planning and lifestyle changes to support health of urban populations.