Browsing by Subject "annostelu"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-1 of 1
  • Vironen, Aleksi (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Evidence based medicines alongside with age-appropriate dosage forms are essential in enabling appropriate treatment for any patient group. Pediatric pharmacotherapy, however, is lacking age-appropriate dosage forms and research-based evidence regarding the dosing, efficacy, and safety of medicines. Orally administered drugs require manipulation to enable administration and are often used against the indications approved in the marketing authorization and summary of product characteristics (SmPC). This off-label use puts pediatric patients at risk for medicational errors and adverse drug reactions. The aim of this study was to investigate recent trends in oral dosage forms used in pediatric randomized controlled trials (RCTs), with emphasis on age appropriateness. The results could be utilized in developing evidence-based dosage forms, suitable for all pediatric patients aged 0-17 years, and manufacturable in a small scale in a hospital pharmacy. This study was conducted as a systematic review following the PRISMA Statement. The literature search was carried out from Pubmed and Scopus databases and it covered a five-year period of 2015-2020. References from the databases were entered to the Covidence systematic review platform. After removing duplicates 3333 articles were left for screening. Two independent researchers selected the articles first screening by title and abstract, and then by full text review. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on the included articles. Altogether 77 articles met the inclusion criteria. Dosage forms included were tablets (n=37), liquids (n=21), capsules (n=18) and multiparticulates (n=6). Majority of the dosage forms were conventional (n=49) compared to more advanced novel modified release and fixed-dose combination formulations (n=33). Based on our results, orally administered dosage forms used in the recent pediatric RCTs are still limited by poor acceptability, palatability, and the need to manipulate dosage forms to enable administration. These issues are similar to the ones related to the off-label use of medicine that compromise patient safety. Majority of the dosage forms included in our study were tablets, indicating a positive shift towards more safe and acceptable dosage form. Formulations were also evolving towards dispersible, extended-release and fixed-dose combinations that offer additional benefits for pediatric patients. The low number of children < 2 years old included in study populations and the poor acceptability profile reported by most studies limit our conclusions on an ideal age-appropriate dosage form. Further research is needed on unifying the guidelines used in pediatric drug development.