Browsing by Subject "atheism"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Gervais, Will M.; van Elk, Michiel; Xygalatas, Dimitris; McKay, Ryan T.; Aveyard, Mark; Buchtel, Emma E.; Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Klocova, Eva Kundtova; Ramsay, Jonathan E.; Riekki, Tapani; Svedholm-Hakkinen, Annika M.; Bulbulia, Joseph (2018)
    Religious belief is a topic of longstanding interest to psychological science, but the psychology of religious disbelief is a relative newcomer. One prominently discussed model is analytic atheism, wherein cognitive reflection, as measured with the Cognitive Reflection Test, overrides religious intuitions and instruction. Consistent with this model, performance-based measures of cognitive reflection predict religious disbelief in WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, & Democratic) samples. However, the generality of analytic atheism remains unknown. Drawing on a large global sample (N = 3461) from 13 religiously, demographically, and culturally diverse societies, we find that analytic atheism as usually assessed is in fact quite fickle cross-culturally, appearing robustly only in aggregate analyses and in three individual countries. The results provide additional evidence for culture's effects on core beliefs.
  • Saarinen, Sampsa (De Gruyter, 2019)
    How does Nietzsche, as psychologist, envision the future of religion and atheism? While there has been no lack of “psychological” studies that have sought to illuminate Nietzsche's philosophy of religion by interpreting his biography, this monograph is the first comprehensive study to approach the topic through the philosopher's own psychological thinking. The author shows how Nietzsche's critical writings on religion, and especially on religious decline and future possibilities, are informed by his psychological thinking about moods. The author furthermore argues that the clarification of this aspect of the philosopher’s work is essential to interpreting some of the most ambiguous words found in his writings; the words that God is dead. Instead of merely denying the existence of God in a way that leaves a melancholic need for religion or a futile search for replacements intact, Nietzsche arguably envisions the possibility of a radical atheism, which is characterized by a mood of joyful doubt. The examination of this vision should be of great interest to scholars of Nietzsche and of the history of philosophy, but also of relevance to all those who take an interest in the interdisciplinary discourse on secularization.