Browsing by Subject "bacteria"

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  • Harrison, Jesse P.; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Salonen, Iines S.; Jilbert, Tom; Koho, Karoliina A. (2021)
    Metabarcoding analyses of bacterial and eukaryotic communities have been proposed as efficient tools for environmental impact assessment. It has been unclear, however, to which extent these analyses can provide similar or differing information on the ecological status of the environment. Here, we used 16S and 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding to compare eutrophication-induced shifts in sediment bacterial and eukaryotic community structure in relation to a range of porewater, sediment and bottom-water geochemical variables, using data obtained from six stations near a former rainbow trout farm in the Archipelago Sea (Baltic Sea). Shifts in the structure of both community types were correlated with a shared set of variables, including porewater ammonium concentrations and the sediment depth-integrated oxygen consumption rate. Distance-based redundancy analyses showed that variables typically employed in impact assessments, such as bottom water nutrient concentrations, explained less of the variance in community structure than alternative variables (e.g., porewater NH4+ inventories and sediment depth-integrated O2 consumption rates) selected due to their low collinearity (up to 40 vs. 58% of the variance explained, respectively). In monitoring surveys where analyses of both bacterial and eukaryotic communities may be impossible, either 16S or 18S rRNA gene metabarcoding can serve as reliable indicators of wider ecological impacts of eutrophication.
  • Keto-Timonen, R.; Tolvanen, R; Lundén, J.; Korkeala, H. (2007)
    Contamination routes of Listeria monocytogenes were examined in a chilled food processing plant that produced ready-to-eat and ready-to-reheat meals during an 8-year period by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. A total of 319 L. monocytogenes isolates were recovered from raw materials (n=18), the environment (n=77), equipment (n=193), and products (n=31), and 18 different AFLP types were identified, five of which were repeatedly found to be persistent types. The three compartments (I to III) of the plant showed markedly different contamination statuses. Compartment I, which produced cooked meals, was heavily contaminated with three persistent AFLP types. AFLP type A1 dominated, and it comprised 93% of the isolates of the compartment. Compartment II, which produced uncooked chilled food, was contaminated with four persistent and five nonpersistent AFLP types. The equipment of compartment III, which produced cooked ready-to-reheat meals, was free of contamination. In compartments that produced cooked meals, the cleaning routines, product types, and lack of compartmentalization seemed to predispose production lines to persistent contamination. The most contaminated lines harbored L. monocytogenes in coolers, conveyors, and packing machines. Good compartmentalization limited the flow of L. monocytogenes into the postheat -treatment area and prevented the undesired movement of equipment and personnel, thus protecting the production lines from contamination. In compartment II, grated cheese was shown to cause product contamination. Therefore, special attention should be paid to continuous quality control of raw ingredients when uncooked ready-to-eat foods are produced. In compartment II, reconstruction of the production line resulted in reduced prevalence rates of L. monocytogenes and elimination of two persistent AFLP types.
  • Rinta-Kanto, J. M.; Pehkonen, K.; Sinkko, H.; Tamminen, M. V.; Timonen, S. (2018)
    In this study, the abundance and composition of prokaryotic communities associated with the inner tissue of fruiting bodies of Suillus bovinus, Boletus pinophilus, Cantharellus cibarius, Agaricus arvensis, Lycoperdon perlatum, and Piptoporus betulinus were analyzed using culture-independent methods. Our findings indicate that archaea and bacteria colonize the internal tissues of all investigated specimens and that archaea are prominent members of the prokaryotic community. The ratio of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copy numbers to those of bacteria was >1 in the fruiting bodies of four out of six fungal species included in the study. The largest proportion of archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belonged to thaumarchaeotal classes Terrestrial group, Miscellaneous Crenar-chaeotic Group (MCG), and Thermoplasmata. Bacterial communities showed characteristic compositions in each fungal species. Bacterial classes Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacilli, and Clostridia were prominent among communities in fruiting body tissues. Bacterial populations in each fungal species had different characteristics. The results of this study imply that fruiting body tissues are an important habitat for abundant and diverse populations of archaea and bacteria.
  • Kaikkonen, Laura; Enberg, Sara; Blomster, Jaanika; Luhtanen, Anne-Mari; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus (Springer Nature, 2020)
    Polar Biology 43 9 (2020)
    Marine microbial communities undergo drastic changes during the seasonal cycle in high latitude seas. Despite the dominance of microbial biomass in the oceans, comprehensive studies on the seasonal changes of microbial plankton during the complete winter period are lacking. To study the seasonal variation in abundance of the microbial community, water samples were collected weekly in the Northern Baltic Sea from October to May. During ice cover from mid-January to April, samples from the sea ice and the underlying water were taken in addition to the water column samples. Abundances of bacteria, virus-like particles, nanoflagellates, and chlorophyll a concentrations were measured from sea ice, under-ice water, and the water column, and examined in relation to environmental conditions. All studied organisms had clear seasonal changes in abundance, and the sea-ice microbial community had an independent wintertime development compared to the water column. Bacteria were observed to have a key role in the biotic interactions in both ice and the water column, and the dormant period during the cold-water months (October–May) was limited to before ice formation. Our results provide the first insights into the temporal dynamics of bacteria and viruses during the whole cold-water season (October–May) in coastal high latitude seas, and demonstrate that changes in the environmental conditions are likely to affect bacterial dynamics and have implications on trophic interactions.
  • Kallio, Tauno (Suomen metsätieteellinen seura, 1974)
  • Giaretta, Paula R.; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Jergens, Albert E.; Steiner, Jorg M.; Lidbury, Jonathan A.; Cook, Audrey K.; Hanifeh, Mohsen; Spillmann, Thomas; Kilpinen, Susanne; Syrja, Pernilla; Rech, Raquel R. (2020)
    The intestinal microbiota is believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease in humans and chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE) in dogs. While most previous studies have described the gut microbiota using sequencing methods, it is fundamental to assess the spatial distribution of the bacteria for a better understanding of their relationship with the host. The microbiota in the colonic mucosa of 22 dogs with CIE and 11 control dogs was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a universal eubacterial probe (EUB338) and specific probes for select bacterial groups. The number of total bacteria labeled with EUB338 probe was lower within the colonic crypts of dogs with CIE compared to controls. Helicobacter spp. and Akkermansia spp. were decreased on the colonic surface and in the crypts of dogs with CIE. Dogs with CIE had increased number of Escherichia coli/Shigella spp. on the colonic surface and within the crypts compared to control dogs. In conclusion, the bacterial microbiota in the colonic mucosa differed between dogs with and without CIE, with depletion of the crypt bacteria in dogs with CIE. The crypt bacterial species that was intimately associated with the host mucosa in control dogs was composed mainly of Helicobacter spp.
  • Eronen-Rasimus, Eeva Liisa; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Lyra, Christina; Autio, Riitta; Kuosa, Harri; Dieckmann, Gerhard S.; Thomas, David N. (2014)
  • Langenheder, Silke; Wang, Jianjun; Karjalainen, Satu Maaria; Laamanen, Tiina M.; Tolonen, Kimmo T.; Vilmi, Annika; Heino, Jani (2017)
    The spatial structure and underlying assembly mechanisms of bacterial communities have been studied widely across aquatic systems, focusing primarily on isolated sites, such as different lakes, ponds and streams. Here, our main aim was to determine the underlying mechanisms for bacterial biofilm assembly within a large, highly connected lake system in Northern Finland using associative methods based on taxonomic and phylogenetic alpha-and beta-diversity and a large number of abiotic and biotic variables. Furthermore, null model approaches were used to quantify the relative importance of different community assembly processes. We found that spatial variation in bacterial communities within the lake was structured by different assembly processes, including stochasticity, species sorting and potentially even dispersal limitation. Species sorting by abiotic environmental conditions explained more of the taxonomic and particularly phylogenetic turnover in community composition compared with that by biotic variables. Finally, we observed clear differences in alpha diversity (species richness and phylogenetic diversity), which were to a stronger extent determined by abiotic compared with biotic factors, but also by dispersal effects. In summary, our study shows that the biodiversity of bacterial biofilm communities within a lake ecosystem is driven by within-habitat gradients in abiotic conditions and by stochastic and deterministic dispersal processes.
  • Camarena‐Gómez, María Teresa; Ruiz‐González, Clara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Lipsewers, Tobias; Sobrino, Cristina; Logares, Ramiro; Spilling, Kristian (American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, 2021)
    Limnology and Oceanography 66: 1, 255-271
    In parts of the Baltic Sea, the phytoplankton spring bloom communities, commonly dominated by diatoms, are shifting toward the co-occurrence of diatoms and dinoflagellates. Although phytoplankton are known to shape the composition and function of associated bacterioplankton communities, the potential bacterial responses to such a decrease of diatoms are unknown. Here we explored the changes in bacterial communities and heterotrophic production during the spring bloom in four consecutive spring blooms across several sub-basins of the Baltic Sea and related them to changes in environmental variables and in phytoplankton community structure. The taxonomic structure of bacterioplankton assemblages was partially explained by salinity and temperature but also linked to the phytoplankton community. Higher carbon biomass of the diatoms Achnanthes taeniata, Skeletonema marinoi, Thalassiosira levanderi, and Chaetoceros spp. was associated with more diverse bacterial communities dominated by copiotrophic bacteria (Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Betaproteobacteria) and higher bacterial production. During dinoflagellate dominance, bacterial production was low and bacterial communities were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, mainly SAR11. Our results suggest that increases in dinoflagellate abundance during the spring bloom will largely affect the structuring and functioning of the associated bacterial communities. This could decrease pelagic remineralization of organic matter and possibly affect the bacterial grazers communities.
  • Pehkonen, Kati (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Fungi play a crucial role in the ecosystem by recycling nutrients and forming mycorrhizal roots with plants. Many of the decomposer and mycorrhizal fungi are Bacidiomycetes. In the sexual reproduction stage, Bacidiomycetes produce fruiting bodies which enable them to produce and disseminate spores allowing fungi to spread to new growing sites. Fruiting bodies have been discovered to contain bacteria which may have a role in differentiation and maintenance of the fruiting body. They might also protect fruiting bodies against animals and diseases, and influence the nutritional value of the fruiting body. There is little knowledge about the amount of bacteria in the fruiting bodies. All previous research has been carried out entirely by cultivation-based methods and it shows that different fungal species contain very different amounts of bacteria. Some fruiting bodies have been shown not to contain easily cultivatable bacteria. The occurrence of archaea in fruiting bodies has not been previously studied and investigation into their function in fungi has only recently begun. In the present work significant amounts of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA -gene copies were discovered in the fruiting bodies of three ectomycorrhizal and three decomposer fungi species. This is the first time fruiting bodies have been shown to contain archaea. The occurrence of bacteria and archaea and the abundance of their 16S rRNA -genes in the fruiting bodies were determined using PCR ja quantitative PCR methods. Suillus bovinus and Boletus pinophilus fruiting bodies contained significantly more archaeal than bacterial gene copies. Cantharellus cibarius and Lycoperdon perlatum contained more bacterial than archaeal 16S rRNA -gene copies. In two decomposer fungi fruiting bodies, Agaricus arvensis and Piptoporus betulinus, the abundance of bacterial and archaeal gene copy numbers were equal. Suillus bovinus fruiting bodies had the largest copy number of archaeal 16S rRNA -genes from all species investigated. According to the results obtained in this work, the occurrence of bacteria and archaea might be common in fruiting bodies. The presence of bacteria and archaea in significant amounts in fruiting bodies may indicate their necessity for the development and sustainability of the fruiting body and hence to the whole life cycle of fungi.
  • Cairns, Johannes; Koskinen, Katariina; Penttinen, Reetta; Patinen, Tommi; Hartikainen, Anna; Jokela, Roosa; Ruusulehto, Liisa; Viitamäki, Sirja; Mattila, Sari; Hiltunen, Teppo; Jalasvuori, Matti (2018)
    Mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids are responsible for antibiotic resistance phenotypes in many bacterial pathogens. The ability to conjugate, the presence of antibiotics, and ecological interactions all have a notable role in the persistence of plasmids in bacterial populations. Here, we set out to investigate the contribution of these factors when the conjugation network was disturbed by a plasmid-dependent bacteriophage. Phage alone effectively caused the population to lose plasmids, thus rendering them susceptible to antibiotics. Leakiness of the antibiotic resistance mechanism allowing Black Queen evolution (i.e. a "race to the bottom") was a more significant factor than the antibiotic concentration (lethal vs sublethal) in determining plasmid prevalence. Interestingly, plasmid loss was also prevented by protozoan predation. These results show that outcomes of attempts to resensitize bacterial communities by disrupting the conjugation network are highly dependent on ecological factors and resistance mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Bacterial antibiotic resistance is often a part of mobile genetic elements that move from one bacterium to another. By interfering with the horizontal movement and the maintenance of these elements, it is possible to remove the resistance from the population. Here, we show that a so-called plasmid-dependent bacteriophage causes the initially resistant bacterial population to become susceptible to antibiotics. However, this effect is efficiently countered when the system also contains a predator that feeds on bacteria. Moreover, when the environment contains antibiotics, the survival of resistance is dependent on the resistance mechanism. When bacteria can help their contemporaries to degrade antibiotics, resistance is maintained by only a fraction of the community. On the other hand, when bacteria cannot help others, then all bacteria remain resistant. The concentration of the antibiotic played a less notable role than the antibiotic used. This report shows that the survival of antibiotic resistance in bacterial communities represents a complex process where many factors present in real-life systems define whether or not resistance is actually lost.
  • Snellman, Marja (2007)
    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe disease and a major cause of death worldwide especially among the elderly. The most common causative pathogen is Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumococcus. The diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia is difficult because there is no gold standard, a diagnostic test that would identify all cases and yet be definite. National Public Health Institute has launched a Finnish Community-Acquired Pneumonia study investigating the frequency and causes of CAP among the elderly aged 65 years and above. Sputum, urine, blood and nasopharyngeal swab samples are the collected from the subjects enrolled in the study and a large number of microbiological assays are performed on samples. One of the main objectives is to find a case definition for pneumococcal pneumonia in the elderly. For this purpose, the accuracy of diagnostic tests performed in the study need to be evaluated. In the absence of gold standard, the true disease status of the subjects is latent and the sensitivities and the specificities of the tests cannot be estimated using conventional methods. The aim of this thesis is to to estimate the sensitivities and the specificities of diagnostic tests and estimate the prevalence of pneumococcal pneumonia among the elderly population in Finland using latent class analysis. The method is applied to data collected in the Finnish Community-Acquired Pneumonia study. Methodological issues in latent class analysis are discussed. In addition, a function for estimating the model parameters using statistical program R is presented. The main sources are: Agresti, Alan 2002: Categorical Data Analysis. Wiley. New York. Hagenaars, Jacques A. 1990: Categorical Longitudinal Data. Sage Publication. London Formann, A. - Kohlmann, T. 1996: Latent class analysis in medical research. Statistical Methods in Medical Research, 5, 179-211.
  • Sörenson, Eva; Bertos-Fortis, Mireia; Farnelid, Hanna; Kremp, Anke; Krüger, Karen; Lindehoff, Elin; Legrand, Catherine (Wiley & Sons, 2019)
    Environmental Microbiology Reports, 11: 425-433
    Phytoplankton and bacteria interactions have a significant role in aquatic ecosystem functioning. Associations can range from mutualistic to parasitic, shaping biogeochemical cycles and having a direct influence on phytoplankton growth. How variations in phenotype and sampling location, affect the phytoplankton microbiome is largely unknown. A high-resolution characterization of the bacterial community in cultures of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium was performed on strains isolated from different geographical locations and at varying anthropogenic impact levels. Microbiomes of Baltic Sea Alexandrium ostenfeldii isolates were dominated by Betaproteobacteria and were consistent over phenotypic and genotypic Alexandrium strain variation, resulting in identification of an A. ostenfeldii core microbiome. Comparisons with in situ bacterial communities showed that taxa found in this A. ostenfeldii core were specifically associated to dinoflagellate dynamics in the Baltic Sea. Microbiomes of Alexandrium tamarense and minutum, isolated from the Mediterranean Sea, differed from those of A. ostenfeldii in bacterial diversity and composition but displayed high consistency, and a core set of bacterial taxa was identified. This indicates that Alexandrium isolates with diverse phenotypes host predictable, species-specific, core microbiomes reflecting the abiotic conditions from which they were isolated. These findings enable in-depth studies of potential interactions occurring between Alexandrium and specific bacterial taxa.
  • Vuorio, Kristiina; Mäki, Anita; Salmi, Pauliina; Aalto, Sanni L.; Tiirola, Marja (Frontiers Media S.A., 2020)
    Frontiers in Microbiology 11 (2020) 96
    The composition of phytoplankton community is the basis for environmental monitoring and assessment of the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems. Community composition studies of phytoplankton have been based on time-consuming and expertise-demanding light microscopy analyses. Molecular methods have the potential to replace microscopy, but the high copy number variation of ribosomal genes and the lack of universal primers for simultaneous amplification of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes complicate data interpretation. In this study, we used our previously developed directional primer-independent high-throughput sequencing (HTS) approach to analyze 16S and 18S rRNA community structures. Comparison of 83 boreal lake samples showed that the relative abundances of eukaryotic phytoplankton at class level and prokaryotic cyanobacteria at order level were consistent between HTS and microscopy results. At the genus level, the results had low correspondence, mainly due to lack of sequences in the reference library. HTS was superior to identify genera that are extensively represented in the reference databases but lack specific morphological characteristics. Targeted metatranscriptomics proved to be a feasible method to complement the microscopy analysis. The metatranscriptomics can also be applied without linking the sequences to taxonomy. However, direct indexing of the sequences to their environmental indicator values needs collections of more comprehensive sample sets, as long as the coverage of molecular barcodes of eukaryotic species remains insufficient.
  • Vilmi, A.; Zhao, W.; Picazo, F.; Li, M.; Heino, J.; Soininen, J.; Wang, J. (2019)
    Science of the Total Environment 702: 134974
    Understanding the role of climatic variation on biodiversity is of chief importance due to the ongoing biodiversity loss and climate change. Freshwaters, one of the most threatened ecosystems in the world, offer a valuable context to study biodiversity patterns of distinct organism groups in relation to climatic variation. In the Tibetan Plateau biodiversity hotspot - Hengduan Mountain region, we studied the effects of climate and local physico-chemical factors on stream microorganisms (i.e. bacteria) and macroorganisms (i.e. macroinvertebrates) in two parallel catchments with contrasting precipitation and temperature, that is, the Nujiang and Lancang Rivers. Diversities and community structures were better explained by climatic and local environmental variables in the drier and colder catchment and at higher elevations, than in the warmer and wetter conditions and at lower elevations. This suggests that communities may be more strongly assembled by deterministic processes in the former, comparatively harsher conditions, compared to the latter, more benign conditions. Macroinvertebrates were more strongly affected by climatic and local environmental factors compared to bacteria, but the diversities and community structures of the two groups showed spatially similar responses to overall abiotic variation, being especially evident with their community structures' responses to climate. Furthermore, bacterial and macroinvertebrate diversities were positively correlated in the drier and colder catchment, implying that these biologically and ecologically distinct organism groups are likely to be driven by similar processes in areas with such climatic conditions. We conclude that changes in climatic and local environmental conditions may affect the diversity of macroorganisms more strongly than that of microorganisms, at least in subtropical mountainous stream ecosystems studied here, but simultaneous responses of both groups to environmental changes can also be expected.
  • Hogle, Shane L.; Hepolehto, Iina; Ruokolainen, Lasse; Cairns, Johannes; Hiltunen, Teppo (2022)
    A popular idea in ecology is that trait variation among individuals from the same species may promote the coexistence of competing species. However, theoretical and empirical tests of this idea have yielded inconsistent findings. We manipulated intraspecific trait diversity in a ciliate competing with a nematode for bacterial prey in experimental microcosms. We found that intraspecific trait variation inverted the original competitive hierarchy to favour the consumer with variable traits, ultimately resulting in competitive exclusion. This competitive outcome was driven by foraging traits (size, speed and directionality) that increased the ciliate's fitness ratio and niche overlap with the nematode. The interplay between consumer trait variation and competition resulted in non-additive cascading effects-mediated through prey defence traits-on prey community assembly. Our results suggest that predicting consumer competitive population dynamics and the assembly of prey communities will require understanding the complexities of trait variation within consumer species.
  • Teittinen, Anette; Virta, Leena; Li, Mingjia; Wang, Jianjun (2021)
    Islands provide ideal model systems to examine the factors influencing biodiversity, yet knowledge of microbial biodiversity on islands remains scarce. We collected a dataset from 101 rock pools along a freshwater to brackish water transition on islands of the Baltic Sea and investigated the patterns and drivers of community composition and species richness of diatoms, cyanobacteria and non-cyanobacteria bacteria among islands. We also examined whether environmental heterogeneity increased beta diversity and species richness within islands. Among islands, the patterns in community composition were concordant among the microbial groups, with distinct changes along the freshwater-brackish gradient. The patterns in species richness were context-dependent for each microbial group. In general, richness patterns were most strongly associated with nutrient concentrations or the distances to potential sources of immigrants, whereas no positive relationships between ecosystem size and richness were found. Within islands, environmental heterogeneity was positively correlated with the beta diversity of each microbial group, but not species richness. Our findings provide novel insights into the factors influencing microbial biodiversity. The results suggest that island microbial biodiversity patterns are influenced by species sorting and dispersal-related mechanisms and highlight the importance of environmental heterogeneity for beta diversity.
  • Huuki, Hanna; Ahvenjaervi, Seppo; Lidauer, Paula; Popova, Milka; Vilkki, Johanna; Vanhatalo, Aila; Tapio, Ilma (2022)
    The development of the functional rumen in calves involves a complex interplay between the host and host-related microbiome. Attempts to modulate rumen microbial community establishment may therefore have an impact on weaning success, calf health, and animal performance later in life. In this experiment, we aimed to elucidate how rumen liquid inoculum from an adult cow, provided to calves during the pre-weaning period, influences the establishment of rumen bacterial, archaeal, fungal, and ciliate protozoan communities in monozygotic twin calves (n = 6 pairs). The calves were divided into treatment (T-group) and control (C-group) groups, where the T-group received fresh rumen liquid as an oral inoculum during a 2-8-week period. The C-group was not inoculated. The rumen microbial community composition was determined using bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene, protozoal 18S rRNA gene, and fungal ITS1 region amplicon sequencing. Animal weight gain and feed intake were monitored throughout the experiment. The T-group tended to have a higher concentrate intake (Treatment: p < 0.08) and had a significantly higher weekly weight gain (Treatment: p < 0.05), but no significant difference in volatile fatty acid concentrations between the groups was observed. In the T-group, the inoculum stimulated the earlier establishment of mature rumen-related bacterial taxa, affecting significant differences between the groups until 6 weeks of age. The inoculum also increased the archaeal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) diversity (Treatment: p < 0.05) but did not affect the archaeal quantity. Archaeal communities differed significantly between groups until week 4 (p = 0.02). Due to the inoculum, ciliate protozoa were detected in the T-group in week 2, while the C-group remained defaunated until 6 weeks of age. In week 8, Eremoplastron dilobum was the dominant ciliate protozoa in the C-group and Isotricha sp. in the T-group, respectively. The Shannon diversity of rumen anaerobic fungi reduced with age (Week: p < 0.01), and community establishment was influenced by a change of diet and potential interaction with other rumen microorganisms. Our results indicate that an adult cow rumen liquid inoculum enhanced the maturation of bacterial and archaeal communities in pre-weaning calves' rumen, whereas its effect on eukaryotic communities was less clear and requires further investigation.
  • Yu, Dahai; Meng, Xin; de Vos, Willem M.; Wu, Hao; Fang, Xuexun; Maiti, Amit K. (2021)
    Humans, throughout the life cycle, from birth to death, are accompanied by the presence of gut microbes. Environmental factors, lifestyle, age and other factors can affect the balance of intestinal microbiota and their impact on human health. A large amount of data show that dietary, prebiotics, antibiotics can regulate various diseases through gut microbes. In this review, we focus on the role of gut microbes in the development of metabolic, gastrointestinal, neurological, immune diseases and, cancer. We also discuss the interaction between gut microbes and the host with respect to their beneficial and harmful effects, including their metabolites, microbial enzymes, small molecules and inflammatory molecules. More specifically, we evaluate the potential ability of gut microbes to cure diseases through Fecal Microbial Transplantation (FMT), which is expected to become a new type of clinical strategy for the treatment of various diseases.
  • Liu, Xinxin; Hui, Nan; Kontro, Merja H. (2020)
    The triazine herbicide atrazine easily leaches with water through soil layers into groundwater, where it is persistent. Its behavior during short-term transport is poorly understood, and there is no in situ remediation method for it. The aim of this study was to investigate whether water circulation, or circulation combined with bioaugmentation (Pseudomonassp. ADP, or four isolates from atrazine-contaminated sediments) alone or with biostimulation (Na-citrate), could enhance atrazine dissipation in subsurface sediment-water systems. Atrazine concentrations (100 mg L-1) in the liquid phase of sediment slurries and in the circulating water of sediment columns were followed for 10 days. Atrazine was rapidly degraded to 53-64 mg L(-1)in the slurries, and further to 10-18 mg L(-1)in the circulating water, by the inherent microbes of sediments collected from 13.6 m in an atrazine-contaminated aquifer. Bioaugmentation without or with biostimulation had minor effects on atrazine degradation. The microbial number simultaneously increased in the slurries from 1.0 x 10(3)to 0.8-1.0 x 10(8)cfu mL(-1), and in the circulating water from 0.1-1.0 x 10(2)to 0.24-8.8 x 10(4)cfu mL(-1). In sediments without added atrazine, the cultivable microbial numbers remained low at 0.82-8.0 x 10(4)cfu mL(-1)in the slurries, and at 0.1-2.8 x 10(3)cfu mL(-1)in the circulating water. The cultivated microorganisms belonged to the nine generaAcinetobacter,Burkholderia,Methylobacterium,Pseudomonas,Rhodococcus,Sphingomonas,Streptomyces,VariovoraxandWilliamsia; i.e., biodiversity was low. Water flow through the sediments released adsorbed and complex-bound atrazine for microbial degradation, though the residual concentration of 10-64 mg L(-1)was high and could contaminate large groundwater volumes from a point source, e.g., during heavy rain or flooding.