Browsing by Subject "bioequivalence"

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  • Toropainen, Elisa; Fraser-Miller, Sara J.; Novakovic, Dunja; Del Amo, Eva M.; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Ruponen, Marika; Viitala, Tapani; Korhonen, Ossi; Auriola, Seppo; Hellinen, Laura; Reinisalo, Mika; Tengvall, Unni; Choi, Stephanie; Absar, Mohammad; Strachan, Clare; Urtti, Arto (2021)
    Eye drops of poorly soluble drugs are frequently formulated as suspensions. Bioavailability of suspended drug depends on the retention and dissolution of drug particles in the tear fluid, but these factors are still poorly understood. We investigated seven ocular indomethacin suspensions (experimental suspensions with two particle sizes and three viscosities, one commercial suspension) in physical and biological tests. The median particle size (d(50)) categories of the experimental suspensions were 0.37-1.33 and 3.12-3.50 mu m and their viscosity levels were 1.3, 7.0, and 15 mPa center dot s. Smaller particle size facilitated ocular absorption of indomethacin to the aqueous humor of albino rabbits. In aqueous humor the AUC values of indomethacin suspensions with different particle sizes, but equal viscosity, differed over a 1.5 to 2.3-fold range. Higher viscosity increased ocular absorption 3.4-4.3-fold for the suspensions with similar particle sizes. Overall, the bioavailability range for the suspensions was about 8-fold. Instillation of larger particles resulted in higher tear fluid AUC values of total indomethacin (suspended and dissolved) as compared to application of smaller particles. Despite these tear fluid AUC values of total indomethacin, instillation of the larger particles resulted in smaller AUC levels of indomethacin in the aqueous humor. This suggests that the small particles yielded higher concentrations of dissolved indomethacin in the tear fluid, thereby leading to improved ocular bioavailability. This new conclusion was supported by ocular pharmacokinetic modeling. Both particle size and viscosity have a significant impact on drug concentrations in the tear fluid and ocular drug bioavailability from topical suspensions. Viscosity and particle size are the key players in the complex interplay of drug retention and dissolution in the tear fluid, thereby defining ocular drug absorption and bioequivalence of ocular suspensions.
  • Heinonen, Susanna (Helsingfors universitet, 2010)
    Methods for the assessment of the bioequivalence (BE) of drug products are generally well-documented and the approaches for such studies are described in guidances issued by regulatory authorities throughout the world. While in general, the BE requirements of most regulatory bodies have much in common, in various instances specific issues and approaches may differ. In the literature part of the master's thesis these differences in the selected regulatory BE guidelines (Europe, United States and World Health Organization) was examined and also the scientific reasons behind these differences were considered. It was found that the prime differences were in the BE related issues in which the scientific community are not in agreement (multiple dosing, highly variable drugs, moieties to be measured (parent/metabolite), food effect studies etc.). The differences were also related to drug products that have biopharmaceutical, bioavailability (BA), pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic properties that preclude the use of standard approaches that are outlined in regulatory guidelines. In the future the push for international harmonization of regulatory standards is hopefully leading to worldwide discussions and changes regarding BE and other components of the drug approval process (both new and generic drugs). Expensive in vivo BE studies are usually needed for generic drug products or if a formulation is significantly altered during clinical trials. In this master's thesis a pharmacokinetic model (based on a compartmental absorption and transit model, CAT) was constructed and tested to predict relative BA, to assess the risk of bioinequivalency and to probe properties of drugs suitable for the use of the model. Also the errors and uncertainties related to the model were discussed. GI tract physiology, formulation type and drug solubility, dissolution, absorption and elimination rates were taken into account in this pharmacokinetic simulation model. In the model formulation differences were described by dissolution rate constant (Kd) (calculated from experimental dissolution data) and gastric emptying rate (GE) (varies for different formulations). Hence, when integrated with a pharmacokinetic compartment model it was possible to get predictions of concentration-time profiles of different formulations. Generalised rules in BE assessment were used to estimate the risk of bioinequivalency. The resolution power of the model and the errors related to the model was evaluated by theoretical pharmacokinetic simulations. Generally, the simulations suggested that the model predicts the risk in the BE study most accurately when the drug belongs to the class I/III in the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) or to the class II when saturation solubility is not the limiting step in the absorption. Used Kd value is valid if dissolution data is accurate (method discriminative). Also, there has to be enough information about the formulation (type, disintegration, excipients). Otherwise it has to be considered if these factors effect on the resolution power. The weaknesses of the simulation models are assumptions. Hence, when exploring the results it has to be estimated case by case, if they affect on model's ability to separate formulations (reliability of the risk assessment and the ability to predict relative BA). This model is useful tool in formulation development and regulatory applications.
  • Saarikko, Elina (Helsingfors universitet, 2010)
    Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) is a scientific framework for classifying drug substances based on their aqueous solubility and intestinal permeability. When combined with dissolution of the drug product, the BCS takes into account three major factors that govern the rate and extent of drug absorption. For a BCS biowaiver, the in vitro dissolution study may be used as a surrogate for in vivo bioequivalence studies. Currently, BCS I drugs are accepted as biowaiver candidates by EMEA, FDA and WHO. EMEA and WHO also accept class III drugs in some conditions. The main difficulty in classifying drugs according to BCS is the determination of permeability. Biopharmaceutics Drug Distribution Classification System (BDDCS) was introduced to provide a surrogate for permeability. If the major route of elimination is metabolism, then the drug exhibites high permeability. There are two parts in this master thesis. BCS and BDDCS are discussed and evaluated in the literature part. The focus is in the BCS III drugs. The purpose of the experimental part is to evaluate BCS III drug, hydrochlorothiazide as a biowaiver candidate. Solubility of the drug substance and dissolution of the drug product was determined. Aim of the permeability studies with Caco-2 cells were to study if hydrochlorothiazide permeates by passive diffusion across the monolayer. Importance of paracellular diffusion was evaluated by opening tight junctions with EDTA. Influence of dissolution rate was evaluated by theoretical simulation. According to the results of this study, hydrochlorothiazide has good solubility in aqueous buffer. It has been reported to diffuse passively across the epithelial cells but in this study permeability increased when concentration decreased. This may be due to active transport. Hydrochlorothiazide diffuses partially through the tight junctions. Dissolution of the hydrochlrothiazide tablet was very rapid. Drug eliminates almost entirely by metabolism, it is also BDDCS class III drug. EMEA and WHO accept BCS III drugs as biowaiver candidate if dissolution rate is very rapid. According to this, hydrochlorothiazide could be suggested as a biowaiver candidate. There are also other issues to be considered, for example excipients used in tablets. Since hydrochlorothiazide has been discovered to be absorbed in the upper part of the small intestine, the influence of excipients is especially important. This possible influence should be evaluated before the final decision of biowaiver.
  • Tossavainen-Nikki, Linda (2020)
    Subject of this study was referrals in marketing authorisation procedures of medicines, in particular related with bioequivalence studies. The focus was in bioequivalence studies of the generic medicines. Referrals are processes in which controversial questions related with marketing authorisations are solved. Bioequivalence studies are required from the generic medicinal products against the original product. Purpose of the study was to find out if the latest renewed bioequivalence guidance from the year 2010 has had an influence in the number of referrals or the reasons for referral. Research material for the case study has been collected mainly from the European Medicines Agency’s public files where information of the referrals can be found via public assessment reports and other public documents and statistics. A list of all the referrals in which the main reason for referral was related with the bioequivalence studies, altogether thirty eight (38) cases, was created and the product list was further investigated against the updated bioequivalence guidance and categorised according to the year of the referral as well as the detailed description of the reason for referral. As a conclusion of the study, one major group of referrals related with bioequivalence study, was noted: the fed and fasting conditions during bioequivalence studies. The bioequivalence guidance from the year 2010 included improved guidance regarding the fed and fasting conditions. Some medicinal products have a different bioavailability depending weather they have been taken with or without meal. Usually fasting conditions is the most sensitive condition to study bioequivalence. Recommendations of the SPC (Summary of Product Characteristics) of the original medicine are followed when choosing fed or fasting conditions for the study. There was found a connection with the rise of the referral cases was and the fast increase of the generic marketing authorisation applications from year 2005 to year 2010. One reason for the number of generics was the generic substitution. However, it was noted that number of referrals did not increased the same amount and share of the bioequivalence referrals was smaller after introducing the new bioequivalence guideline. In this study, also referrals regarding Good Clinical Practise (GCP) were briefly reviewed since some bioequivalence related referrals dealt with deficiencies in the Contract Research Organisations (CRO’s). Authorities are responsible for inspecting these facilities in order to guarantee the reliability of the clinical studies as well as safety and efficacy of the studies. However, there were only seven referrals regarding CRO’s and therefore it was not possible to make deep conclusions based on these cases due to the narrow material. However, in most of these referral cases the outcome was that there were not such neglects which would have been criteria for suspension of the marketing authorisations.