Browsing by Subject "blood pressure"

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  • Tietäväinen, Johanna; Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Huhtala, Heini; Pörsti, Ilkka; Vaheri, Antti; Mustonen, Jukka (2021)
    Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. We aimed to evaluate whether ABO and rhesus blood groups associate with the susceptibility or the severity of PUUV infection. We analyzed blood groups in 289 adult patients treated in Tampere University hospital due to PUUV infection during the years 1982-2017. Patients' blood group distribution was compared to that of healthy, voluntary blood donors living in the Tampere University Hospital responsibility area (n = 21,833). The severity of PUUV infection, as judged by the severity of acute kidney injury (AKI), thrombocytopenia, inflammation, capillary leakage, and the length of hospital care, was analyzed across the groups. The ABO and rhesus blood group distributions did not differ between the patients and blood donors. Patients with non-O blood groups had lower systolic blood pressure compared to patients with blood group O, but there was no difference in other markers of capillary leakage or in the severity of AKI. Minor deviations in the number of platelets and leukocytes were detected between the O and non-O blood groups. To conclude, patients with blood group O may be less susceptible to hypotension, but otherwise blood groups have no major influences on disease susceptibility or severity during acute PUUV infection.
  • Eriksson, Johan G.; Salonen, Minna K.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.; Wasenius, Niko; Kajantie, Eero; Kautiainen, Hannu; Mikkola, Tuija M. (2022)
    The main objective of this study was to study predictors of vascular health with focus on adiposity-related factors. Glucose metabolism, blood lipids, inflammatory markers and body composition were assessed 15 years before assessment of vascular health which was assessed with pulse wave velocity (PWV) in 660 subjects born 1934-44. In a univariate analysis in women the strongest association with PWV was seen for age, systolic blood pressure, dysglycemia, dyslipidemia, inflammatory markers and body fat percentage measured in late midlife and PWV measured 15 years later. In men age, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, dysglycemia, and body fat percentage in late midlife were associated with PWV. One novel finding was that adiposity-related factors were strong predictors of vascular health, something not fully encapsulated in BMI, lean body mass or body fat percentage alone. A higher fat mass index was associated with worse vascular health, which was not ameliorated by a higher lean mass index. Our findings stress the importance to study body composition and fat and lean body mass simultaneously because of their close interaction with each other also in relation to vascular health.
  • Al-Ahmadi, Jawaher; Enani, Sumia; Bahijri, Suhad; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Jambi, Hanan; Eldakhakhny, Basmah; Borai, Anwar; Ajabnoor, Ghada; Tuomilehto, Jaakko (2022)
    Context: Waist circumference (WC) is used in screening for metabolic syndrome (MetS) based on its association with cardiometabolic risk.This might apply differently in ethnically different populations. Associations with other measures are also unclear. Objective: This work aimed to investigate the association between neck circumference (NC), WC, WC:hip circumference, WC:height (VVC:Ht), NC:Ht, fat percentage, body mass index (BMI), conicity index, abdominal volume index, and weight-adjusted waist index with nonanthropometric components of MetS in nondiabetic Saudi adults. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place in public health centers in Jeddah, comprising 1365 Saudi adults (772 men and 593 women) aged 18 years or older not previously diagnosed with diabetes. Main outcome measures included the presence of 2 or more nonanthropometric components of the MetS were used to define clinical metabolic abnormality (CMA). The predictive ability of studied anthropometric indices for CMA was determined using the area under receiver operating characteristics (AUC) curve and binary logistic regression. Results: A total of 157 men and 83 women had CMA. NC and NC:Ht had the highest predictive ability for CMA in men (odds ratio [OR](NC) = 1.79, P < .001 and ORNC:Ht = 1.68, P < .001; AUC(NC) = 0.69 [95% CI, 0.64-0.74] and ALS, = 0.69 [95% CI, 0.64-0.73]). In women, WC had the highest predictive ability ORWC = 1.81, P< .001; AUC(WC) = 0.75 [95% CI, 0.69-0.80]). Conclusion: Upper-body anthropometric indicators that were associated with subcutaneous fat had the highest predictive ability for CMA in men whereas abdominal obesity indictors had the best predictive ability in women, suggesting that fat distribution might contribute to CMA in a sex-specific manner.
  • Palmu, Joonatan; Salosensaari, Aaro; Havulinna, Aki S.; Cheng, Susan; Inouye, Michael; Jain, Mohit; Salido, Rodolfo A.; Sanders, Karenina; Brennan, Caitriona; Humphrey, Gregory C.; Sanders, Jon G.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Knight, Rob; Lahti, Leo; Niiranen, Teemu J. (2020)
    Background Several small-scale animal studies have suggested that gut microbiota and blood pressure (BP) are linked. However, results from human studies remain scarce and conflicting. We wanted to elucidate the multivariable-adjusted association between gut metagenome and BP in a large, representative, well-phenotyped population sample. We performed a focused analysis to examine the previously reported inverse associations between sodium intake and Lactobacillus abundance and between Lactobacillus abundance and BP. Methods and Results We studied a population sample of 6953 Finns aged 25 to 74 years (mean age, 49.212.9 years; 54.9% women). The participants underwent a health examination, which included BP measurement, stool collection, and 24-hour urine sampling (N=829). Gut microbiota was analyzed using shallow shotgun metagenome sequencing. In age- and sex-adjusted models, the alpha (within-sample) and beta (between-sample) diversities of taxonomic composition were strongly related to BP indexes (P diversity was only associated with diastolic BP (P=0.032). However, we observed significant, mainly positive, associations between BP indexes and 45 microbial genera (P Conclusions Although the associations between overall gut taxonomic composition and BP are weak, individuals with hypertension demonstrate changes in several genera. We demonstrate strong negative associations of certain Lactobacillus species with sodium intake and BP, highlighting the need for experimental studies.
  • Nykänen, Tarja; Pihlainen, Kai; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Fogelholm, Mikael (2020)
    Objectives: This observational follow-up study investigated the associations of nutrition and body composition with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including pro-inflammatory biomarkers, in soldiers during a 6-month deployment. Material and Methods: Thirty-five male soldiers were assessed at months 0, 3 and 6, and their parameters, i.e., M +/- SD, were as follows: age 30.0 +/- 8.7 years, height 179 +/- 6 cm, and BMI 24.2 +/- 2.5 kg/m(2). Three-day food diaries were used for monitoring macronutrient intake. Body composition was estimated using bioimpedance. Fasting blood samples for lipids and pro-inflammatory biomarkers were collected, and blood pressure measurements were performed. Results: Carbohydrate intake increased and protein intake decreased at month 3 (p = 0.034, p <0.001), while body composition remained stable. Systolic blood pressure increased at month 6, while other CVD risk factors remained within the reference values. Fat mass and body fat percentage were associated positively with total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations at all measurement points. A negative association was found between the change in fiber intake vs. the change in total (r = -0.36, p = 0.033) and LDL cholesterol (R = -0.39, p = 0.019). Conclusions: Lower fiber intake and a greater amount of body fat were associated with high total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. Nevertheless, the measured CVD risk factors remained within the reference values, except for the higher systolic blood pressure. A regular screening of body composition and a higher consumption of fiber-rich foods may promote cardiometabolic health in soldiers.
  • Rovio, Suvi P.; Pahkala, Katja; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Juonala, Markus; Salo, Pia; Kahonen, Mika; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Lehtimaki, Terho; Jokinen, Eero; Laitinen, Tomi; Taittonen, Leena; Tossavainen, Paivi; Viikari, Jorma S. A.; Rinne, Juha O.; Raitakari, Olli T. (2017)
    BACKGROUND In adults, high blood pressure (BP), adverse serum lipids, and smoking associate with cognitive deficits. The effects of these risk factors from childhood on midlife cognitive performance are unknown. OBJECTIVES This study sought to investigate the associations between childhood/adolescence cardiovascular risk factors and midlife cognitive performance. METHODS From 1980, a population-based cohort of 3,596 children (baseline age: 3 to 18 years) have been followed for 31 years in 3- to 9-year intervals. BP, serum lipids, body mass index, and smoking were assessed in all follow-ups. Cumulative exposure as the area under the curve for each risk factor was determined in childhood (6 to 12 years), adolescence (12 to 18 years), and young adulthood (18 to 24 years). In 2011, cognitive testing was performed in 2,026 participants aged 34 to 49 years. RESULTS High systolic BP, elevated serum total-cholesterol, and smoking from childhood were independently associated with worse midlife cognitive performance, especially memory and learning. The number of early life risk factors, including high levels (extreme 75th percentile for cumulative risk exposure between ages 6 and 24 years) of systolic BP, total-cholesterol, and smoking associated inversely with midlife visual and episodic memory and visuospatial associative learning (-0.140 standard deviations per risk factor, p <0.0001) and remained significant after adjustment for contemporaneous risk factors. Individuals with all risk factors within recommended levels between ages 6 and 24 years performed 0.29 standard deviations better (p = 0.006) on this cognitive domain than those exceeding all risk factor guidelines at least twice. This difference corresponds to the effect of 6 years aging on this cognitive domain. CONCLUSIONS Cumulative burden of cardiovascular risk factors from childhood/adolescence associate with worse midlife cognitive performance independent of adulthood exposure. (C) 2017 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
  • Palmu, Joonatan; Tikkanen, Emmi; Havulinna, Aki S.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Lundqvist, Annamari; Ruuskanen, Matti O.; Perola, Markus; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Jousilahti, Pekka; Wurtz, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Lahti, Leo; Niiranen, Teemu (2022)
    Objective: Previous studies on the association between metabolic biomarkers and hypertension have been limited by small sample sizes, low number of studied biomarkers, and cross-sectional study design. In the largest study to date, we assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between high-abundance serum biomarkers and blood pressure (BP). Methods: We studied cross-sectional (N = 36 985; age 50.5 +/- 14.2; 53.1% women) and longitudinal (N = 4197; age 49.4 +/- 11.8, 55.3% women) population samples of Finnish individuals. We included 53 serum biomarkers and other detailed lipoprotein subclass measures in our analyses. We studied the associations between serum biomarkers and BP using both conventional statistical methods and a machine learning algorithm (gradient boosting) while adjusting for clinical risk factors. Results: Fifty-one of 53 serum biomarkers were cross-sectionally related to BP (adjusted P < 0.05 for all). Conventional linear regression modeling demonstrated that LDL cholesterol, remnant cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and acetate were positively, and HDL particle size was negatively, associated with SBP change over time (adjusted P < 0.05 for all). Adding serum biomarkers (cross-sectional root-mean-square error: 16.27 mmHg; longitudinal: 17.61 mmHg) in the model with clinical measures (cross-sectional: 16.70 mmHg; longitudinal 18.52 mmHg) improved the machine learning model fit. Glucose, albumin, triglycerides in LDL, glycerol, VLDL particle size, and acetoacetate had the highest importance scores in models related to current or future BP. Conclusion: Our results suggest that serum lipids, and particularly LDL-derived and VLDL-derived cholesterol measures, and glucose metabolism abnormalities are associated with hypertension onset. Use of serum metabolite determination could improve identification of individuals at high risk of developing hypertension.
  • Huang, Yisong; Ollikainen, Miina; Sipilä, Pyry; Mustelin, Linda; Wang, Xin; Su, Shaoyong; Huan, Tianxiao; Levy, Daniel; Wilson, James; Snieder, Harold; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xiaoling (2018)
    Recently, 2 transcriptome-wide studies identified 40 genes that were differentially expressed in relation to blood pressure. However, to what extent these BP-related gene expression signatures and their associations with BP are driven by genetic or environmental factors has not been investigated. In this study of 391 twins (193 twin pairs and 5 singletons; age 55-69 years; 40% male; 57% monozygous) recruited from the Finnish Twin Cohort, transcriptome-wide data on peripheral leukocytes were obtained using the Illumina HT12 V4 array. Our transcriptome-wide analysis identified 1 gene (MOK [MAPK/MAK/MRK overlapping kinase], P=7.16x10(-8)) with its expression levels associated with systolic BP at the cutoff of false-discovery rate
  • SUMMIT Steering Comm; CARDIOGRAMplusC4D Steering Comm; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Ladenvall, Claes; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Salomaa, Veikko; Groop, Leif; Ripatti, Samuli (2020)
    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is accelerated in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). METHODS: To test whether this reflects differential genetic influences on CAD risk in subjects with T2D, we performed a systematic assessment of genetic overlap between CAD and T2D in 66 643 subjects (27 708 with CAD and 24 259 with T2D). Variants showing apparent association with CAD in stratified analyses or evidence of interaction were evaluated in a further 117 787 subjects (16 694 with CAD and 11 537 with T2D). RESULTS: None of the previously characterized CAD loci was found to have specific effects on CAD in T2D individuals, and a genome-wide interaction analysis found no new variants for CAD that could be considered T2D specific. When we considered the overall genetic correlations between CAD and its risk factors, we found no substantial differences in these relationships by T2D background. CONCLUSIONS: This study found no evidence that the genetic architecture of CAD differs in those with T2D compared with those without T2D.
  • Salo, Perttu P.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Tukiainen, Taru; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Männikkö, Minna; Eriksson, Johan G.; Jula, Antti; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Salomaa, Veikko; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus (2017)
    Background Cardiomyocytes secrete atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in response to mechanical stretching, making them useful clinical biomarkers of cardiac stress. Both human and animal studies indicate a role for ANP as a regulator of blood pressure with conflicting results for BNP. Methods and Results We used genome-wide association analysis (n=6296) to study the effects of genetic variants on circulating natriuretic peptide concentrations and compared the impact of natriuretic peptide-associated genetic variants on blood pressure (n=27059). Eight independent genetic variants in 2 known (NPPA-NPPB and POC1B-GALNT4) and 1 novel locus (PPP3CC) associated with midregional proANP (MR-proANP), BNP, aminoterminal proBNP (NT-proBNP), or BNP:NT-proBNP ratio. The NPPA-NPPB locus containing the adjacent genes encoding ANP and BNP harbored 4 independent cis variants with effects specific to either midregional proANP or BNP and a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism in NT-proBNP seriously altering its measurement. Variants near the calcineurin catalytic subunit gamma gene PPP3CC and the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 4 gene GALNT4 associated with BNP:NT-proBNP ratio but not with BNP or midregional proANP, suggesting effects on the post-translational regulation of proBNP. Out of the 8 individual variants, only those correlated with midregional proANP had a statistically significant albeit weak impact on blood pressure. The combined effect of these 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms also associated with hypertension risk (P=8.2x10(-4)). Conclusions Common genetic differences affecting the circulating concentration of ANP associated with blood pressure, whereas those affecting BNP did not, highlighting the blood pressure-lowering effect of ANP in the general population.
  • Singh, Sonal; Warren, Helen R.; Hiltunen, Timo P.; McDonough, Caitrin W.; El Rouby, Nihal; Salvi, Erika; Wang, Zhiying; Garofalidou, Tatiana; Fyhrquist, Frej; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Glorioso, Valeria; Zaninello, Roberta; Glorioso, Nicola; Pepine, Carl J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Turner, Stephan T.; Chapman, Arlene B.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Johnson, Julie A.; Gong, Yan; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M. (2019)
    Background-There exists a wide interindividual variability in blood pressure (BP) response to beta(1)-blockers. To identify the genetic determinants of this variability, we performed a pharmacogenomic genome-wide meta-analysis of genetic variants beta(1)-influencing blocker BP response. Methods and Results-Genome-wide association analysis for systolic BP and diastolic BP response to beta(1)-blockers from 5 randomized clinical trials consisting of 1254 patients with hypertension of European ancestry were combined in meta-analysis and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with P Conclusions-Data from randomized clinical trials of 8 European ancestry and 2 black cohorts support the assumption that BST1 containing locus on chromosome 4 is associated with beta(1)-blocker BP response. Given the previous associations of this region with BP, this is a strong candidate region for future functional studies and potential use in precision medicine approaches for BP management and risk prediction.
  • Cooper, Mark E.; Perkovic, Vlado; Groop, Per-Henrik; Hocher, Berthold; Hehnke, Uwe; Meinicke, Thomas; Koitka-Weber, Audrey; van der Walt, Sandra; von Eynatten, Maximilian (2019)
    Objective: Concomitant treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors is increasingly common. Pharmacological studies have suggested a potential adverse drug interaction between ACE inhibitors and DPP-4 inhibitors resulting in unfavorable hemodynamic changes; very few studies have examined such an interaction between angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) and DPP-4 inhibitors. We investigated blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) during treatment with the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin in individuals receiving either ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the MARLINA-T2D trial. Methods: In this study, 360 individuals with type 2 diabetes and albuminuria receiving unchanged doses of ACE inhibitors or ARBs were randomized to linagliptin or placebo. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, an exploratory endpoint, was conducted at baseline and after 24 weeks. Results: Ambulatory BP monitoring data were available for 208 individuals (linagliptin: n = 111; placebo: n = 97). Baseline mean +/- SD 24-h SBP and DBP were 132.5 +/- 12.4 mmHg and 75.9 +/- 9.4 mmHg, respectively; mean 24-h HR was 76.3 +/- 10.1 bpm. At week 24, no overall effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor versus placebo was seen on mean 24-h SBP, DBP, or HR. Furthermore, in the subgroups receiving either an ACE inhibitor or an ARB, no effect on these hemodynamic parameters was seen as a result of concomitant DPP-4 inhibitor treatment. Conclusion: Adding linagliptin to treatment with ACE inhibitors or ARBs was not associated with any hemodynamic changes, supporting their concomitant use in individuals with type 2 diabetes and albuminuria.
  • Mellembakken, Jan Roar; Mahmoudan, Azita; Morkrid, Lars; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Hirschberg, Angelica Linden; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vanky, Eszter; Ravn, Pernille; Jensen, Richard Christian; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Glintborg, Dorte (2021)
    Objective: Obesity is considered to be the strongest predictive factor for cardio-metabolic risk in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of the study was to compare blood pressure (BP) in normal weight women with PCOS and controls matched for age and BMI. Methods: From a Nordic cross-sectional base of 2615 individuals of Nordic ethnicity, we studied a sub cohort of 793 normal weight women with BMI <25 k g/m(2) (512 women with PCOS according to Rotterdam criteria and 281 age and BMI-matched controls). Participants underwent measurement of BP and body composition (BMI, waist-hip ratio), lipid status, and fasting BG. Data were presented as median (quartiles). Results: The median age for women with PCOS were 28 (25, 32) years and median BMI was 22.2 (20.7, 23.4) kg/m(2). Systolic BP was 118 (109, 128) mmHg in women with PCOS compared to 110 (105, 120) mmHg in controls and diastolic BP was 74 ( 67, 81) vs 70 (64, 75) mmHg, both P <0.001. The prevalence of women with BP >= 140/90 mmHg was 11.1% (57/ 512) in women with PCOS vs 1.8% (5/281) in controls, P <0.001. In women >= 35 years the prevalence of BP >= 140/90 mmHg was comparable in women with PCOS and controls (12.7% vs 9.8%, P = 0.6). Using multiple regression analyses, the strongest association with BP was found for age, waist circumference, and total cholesterol in women with PCOS. Conclusions: Normal weight women with PCOS have higher BP than controls. BP and metabolic screening are relevant also in young normal weight women with PCOS.
  • Benetos, Athanase; Petrovic, Mirko; Strandberg, Timo (2019)
    The prevalence of arterial hypertension, particularly systolic hypertension, is constantly rising worldwide. This is mainly the clinical expression of arterial stiffening as a result of the population's aging. Chronic elevation in blood pressure represents a major risk factor not only for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality but also for cognitive decline and loss of autonomy later in life. Clinical evidence obtained in community-dwelling older people with few comorbidities and preserved autonomy supports the beneficial effects of lowering blood pressure in older hypertensive subjects even after the age of 80 years. However, observational studies in frail older individuals treated for hypertension have shown higher morbidity and mortality rates compared with those with lower blood pressure levels. Clearly, in very old subjects, the therapeutic strategy of one size fits all cannot be applied because of the enormous functional heterogeneity in these individuals. Geriatric medicine proposes taking into account the function/ frailty/ autonomy status of older people. In the present review, we propose to adapt the antihypertensive treatment using an easy-to-apply visual numeric scale allowing the identification of 3 different patient profiles according to the functional status and autonomy for activities of daily living. For the preserved function profile, strategies should be those proposed for younger old adults. For the loss of function/ preserved activities of daily living' profile, a more detailed geriatric assessment is needed to define the benefit/ risk balance as well as requirements for the tailoring of the various therapeutic strategies. Lastly, for the loss of function and altered activities of daily living' profile, therapeutic strategies should be thoroughly reassessed, including deprescribing (when considered appropriate). In the near future, controlled trials are necessary for the most frail older subjects (ie, in those systematically excluded from previous clinical trials) to gain stronger evidence regarding the benefits of the various therapeutic strategies.
  • Huang, Yisong; Ollikainen, Miina; Muniandy, Maheswary; Zhang, Tao; van Dongen, Jenny; Hao, Guang; van Der Most, Peter J.; Pan, Yue; Pervjakova, Natalia; Sun, Yan; Hui, Qin; Lahti, Jari; Fraszczyk, Eliza; Lu, Xueling; Sun, Dianjianyi; Richard, Melissa A.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Heikkila, Kauko; Leach, Irene Mateo; Mononen, Nina; Kähönen, Mika; Hurme, Mikko A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Drake, Amanda J.; Perola, Markus; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Huang, Yunfeng; Khulan, Batbayar; Räikkönen, Katri; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Fu, Jingyuan; Zhu, Haidong; Dong, Yanbin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Franke, Lude; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fornage, Myriam; Milani, Lili; Lehtimäki, Terho; Vaccarino, Viola; Boomsma, Dorret; van Der Harst, Pim; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Salomaa, Veikko; Li, Shengxu; Chen, Wei; Su, Shaoyong; Wilson, James; Snieder, Harold; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xiaoling (2020)
    We conducted an epigenome-wide association study meta-analysis on blood pressure (BP) in 4820 individuals of European and African ancestry aged 14 to 69. Genome-wide DNA methylation data from peripheral leukocytes were obtained using the Infinium Human Methylation 450k BeadChip. The epigenome-wide association study meta-analysis identified 39 BP-related CpG sites withP
  • Skrifvars, Markus B.; Aneman, Anders; Ameloot, Koen (2020)
    Purpose of review To discuss recent findings relevant to optimizing blood pressure targets in adult, postcardiac arrest (PCA) patients and whether to tailor these based on specific patient, cardiac arrest or treatment characteristics. Recent findings Observational data suggest that mean arterial pressure (MAP) below 65-75 mmHg in PCA patients is associated with worse outcome. A higher MAP could be beneficial in patients with chronic hypertension who more frequently have a right shift of the cerebral autoregulation curve. Two recent randomized pilot trials compared lower and higher MAP targets during PCA care and found no significant effect on biomarkers of neurological injury. The haemodynamic interventions in those studies did not use any cerebral perfusion endpoints beyond a static MAP targets during ICU stay. Individualized, dynamic MAP targets based on assessments of cerebral perfusion and tailored to the specifics of the patient, cardiac arrest circumstances and treatment responses may be more conducive to improved outcomes. Pilot data suggest that near infrared spectroscopy monitoring may be used to determine the cerebral autoregulatory capacity and an optimal MAP, but this approach is yet to be tested in clinical trials. Current evidence suggests targeting a MAP of at least 65-75 mmHg in PCA patients. Future studies should focus on whether certain patient groups could benefit from higher and dynamic MAP targets.
  • Heiskanen, Jarkko S.; Hernesniemi, Jussi A.; Ruohonen, Saku; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Kähönen, Mika; Jokinen, Eero; Tossavainen, Paivi; Kallio, Merja; Laitinen, Tomi; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma; Juonala, Markus; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Raitakari, Olli T. (2021)
    Background Increased left ventricular mass (LVM) predicts cardiovascular events and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine whether early-life exposures to body mass index (BMI) and systolic blood pressure (SPB) affects the left ventricular structure in adulthood. Methods We used longitudinal data from a 31-year follow-up to examine the associations between early-life (between ages 6-18) BMI and SPB on LVM in an adult population (N = 1864, aged 34-49). The burden of early-life BMI and SBP was defined as area under the curve. Results After accounting for contemporary adult determinants of LVM, early-life BMI burden associated significantly with LVM (3.61 g/SD increase in early-life BMI; [1.94 - 5.28], p <0.001). Overweight in early-life (age- and sex-specific BMI values corresponding to adult BMI > 25 kg/m(2)) associated with 4.7% (2.5-6.9%, p <0.0001) higher LVM regardless of BMI status in adulthood. Overweight in early-life combined with obesity in adulthood (BMI > 30kg/m(2)) resulted in a 21% (17.3-32.9%, p <0.0001) increase in LVM. Higher early-life BMI was associated with a risk of developing eccentric hypertrophy. The burden of early-life SPB was not associated with adult LVM or left ventricular remodeling. Conclusions High BMI in early-life confers a sustained effect on LVM and the risk for eccentric hypertrophy independently of adulthood risk factors. KEY MESSAGES Excess in BMI in early-life has an independent effect on LVM and the risk of developing eccentric hypertrophy regardless of overweight status in adulthood. Systolic blood pressure levels in early-life did not have an independent effect on LVM or LV remodeling. The clinical implication of this study is that primary prevention of obesity in early-life may prevent the development of high LVM and eccentric hypertrophy.
  • Ehlers, Pauliina (2022)
    Research around food-derived compounds possessing pharmacological effects and potentially also affecting health status beneficially has during the recent years increased. At the same time, new regulations have been put in place to direct the use of different claims on food products. Distinction between food and drugs needs to be clear and consumers and patients cannot be misled. One of the focus areas in research has been products affecting cardiovascular function. The aim of this licentiate thesis was to find out if already developed high blood pressure can be decreased and endothelial dysfunction improved by bioactive milk-derived tripeptides isoleucine-prolineproline (Ile-Pro-Pro) and valine-proline-proline (Val-Pro-Pro) and plant sterols in an experimental animal model (spontaneously hypertensive rats, SHR). In addition, one of the aims was to investigate if combining tripeptides and plant sterols could have positive, synergistic effects on the development of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. As pre-clinical studies precede extensive clinical studies in humans also during the drug development process, some comparison between food-derived substances and blood pressure-lowering drugs was made and interfaces between functional foods and drugs was discussed. This licentiate thesis showed that long-term treatment with fermented milk enriched with tripeptides and plant sterols decreased systolic blood pressure, improved endothelial dysfunction and affected signaling pathways related to inflammatory responses in SHR with already established hypertension. Long-term treatment with plant sterols had only a slight but not significant effect for the development of hypertension. Plant sterols did not provide any beneficial effects on endothelial function in hypertensive rats; however, treatment with both plant sterols and tripeptides showed mild anti-inflammatory effects. To get a better picture of the magnitude of the effect of the studied food-derived substances on blood pressure and vascular function, further studies (either with animals or humans) would benefit from including both food-derived substances and drugs as different treatment arms in the same study. Taken together, there are some similarities between functional foods and drugs what comes to product approval processes or claims made on the products, research and effects on blood pressure, for example, but studying food-derived substances brings several challenges compared to drugs what comes to study set-up and interpretation of the results. However, reflecting on the results of the present studies and available literature, food-derived substances such as tripeptides from milk could be a good alternative for subjects with increased blood pressure who do not yet implicitly need drug treatment and can still try to improve their health status with lifestyle changes, such as nutrition.
  • Virtanen, Marianna; Hansson, Linda Magnusson; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Stenholm, Sari; Vahtera, Jussi; Westerlund, Hugo; Kivimäki, Mika (2019)
    Background Although long working hours have been shown to be associated with the onset of cardiometabolic diseases, the clinical risk factor profile associated with long working hours remains unclear. We compared the clinical risk profile between people who worked long hours and those who reported being never exposed to long hours. Methods A cross-sectional study in 22 health screening centres in France was based on a random population-based sample of 75 709 participants aged 18-69 at study inception in 2012-2016 (the CONSTANCES study). The data included survey responses on working hours (never, former or current exposure to long working hours), covariates and standardised biomedical examinations including anthropometry, lung function, blood pressure and standard blood-based biomarkers. Results Among men, long working hours were associated with higher anthropometric markers (Body Mass Index, waist circumference and waist:hip ratio), adverse lipid levels, higher glucose, creatinine, white blood cells and higher alanine transaminase (adjusted mean differences in the standardised scale between the exposed and unexposed 0.02-0.12). The largest differences were found for Body Mass Index and waist circumference. A dose-response pattern with increasing years of working long hours was found for anthropometric markers, total cholesterol, glucose and gamma-glutamyltransferase. Among women, long working hours were associated with Body Mass Index and white blood cells. Conclusion In this study, men who worked long hours had slightly worse cardiometabolic and inflammatory profile than those who did not work long hours, especially with regard to anthropometric markers. In women, the corresponding associations were weak or absent.
  • LifeLines Cohort Study; Sun, Daokun; Richard, Melissa A.; Musani, Solomon K.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O. (2021)
    Psychological and social factors are known to influence blood pressure (BP) and risk of hypertension and associated cardiovascular diseases. To identify novel BP loci, we carried out genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic, diastolic, pulse, and mean arterial BP, taking into account the interaction effects of genetic variants with three psychosocial factors: depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and social support. Analyses were performed using a two-stage design in a sample of up to 128,894 adults from five ancestry groups. In the combined meta-analyses of stages 1 and 2, we identified 59 loci (p value < 5e−8), including nine novel BP loci. The novel associations were observed mostly with pulse pressure, with fewer observed with mean arterial pressure. Five novel loci were identified in African ancestry, and all but one showed patterns of interaction with at least one psychosocial factor. Functional annotation of the novel loci supports a major role for genes implicated in the immune response (PLCL2), synaptic function and neurotransmission (LIN7A and PFIA2), as well as genes previously implicated in neuropsychiatric or stress-related disorders (FSTL5 and CHODL). These findings underscore the importance of considering psychological and social factors in gene discovery for BP, especially in non-European populations.