Browsing by Subject "cancer risk"

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  • Halonen, Pia; Jakobsson, Maija; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Riska, Annika; Gissler, Mika; Pukkala, Eero (2018)
    The association between Lichen planus (LP) and cancer has been under debate for decades. We studied the connection via population-based Finnish register data. All women with the diagnosis of LP (n=13,100) were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Registry from 1969-2012. These patients were linked with subsequent cancer diagnoses from the Finnish Cancer Registry until 2014. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were counted for different cancers by dividing the observed numbers of cancers by expected numbers, which were based on national cancer incidence rates. In total, 1,520 women with LP were diagnosed with cancer (SIR 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.20). LP was associated with an increased risk of cancer of lip (SIR 5.17, 95% CI 3.06-8.16), cancer of tongue (SIR 12.4, 95% CI 9.45-16.0), cancer of oral cavity (SIR 7.97, 95% CI 6.79-9.24), cancer of esophagus (SIR 1.95, 95% CI 1.17-3.04), cancer of larynx (SIR of 3.47, 95% CI 1.13-8.10) and cancer of vulva (SIR 1.99, 95% CI 1.18-3.13). The risk of cancer was not increased in other locations where LP manifests (pharynx and skin). Patients with diagnosed LP have an increased risk of developing cancer of lip, tongue, oral cavity, esophagus, larynx and vulva. These data are important when considering treatment and follow-up of patients with LP diagnosis. What's new?Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic disease of the skin and mucous membranes that is likely autoimmune in origin. Owing to its inflammatory nature, it is also suspected of causing certain cancers. Whether LP possesses malignant potential, however, remains uncertain. Here, in a cohort of 13,100 women diagnosed with LP between 1969 and 2012 in Finland, some 1,520 were eventually diagnosed with cancer. Malignancies with significant increases in incidence in LP patients included those of the lip, tongue, oral cavity, esophagus, larynx and vulva. The findings suggest that LP patients could benefit from multidisciplinary approaches to care.
  • Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, P.; Dennis, J.; Domchek, S.M.; Robson, M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Ramus, S.J.; Mavaddat, N.; Terry, M.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Offit, K.; Couch, F.J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Healey, S.; Lush, M.; Hamann, U.; Southey, M.; John, E.M.; Chung, W.K.; Daly, M. B.; Buys, S.S.; Goldgar, D.E.; Dorfling, C.M.; van Rensburg, E.J.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Hansen, T.V.O.; Slager, S.; Hallberg, E.; Benitez, J.; Osorio, A.; Cohen, N.; Lawler, W.; Weitzel, J.N.; Peterlongo, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Barile, M.; Aittomäki, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Rantala, J. (2017)
    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]-positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2 × 10-53). InBRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BCPRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2 × 10-20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. © The Author 2017.
  • Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration; Fitzmaurice, C.; Doku, D.T.; Hadkhale, K.; Meretoja, T.J.; Neupane, S. (2019)
    Importance: Cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are now widely recognized as a threat to global development. The latest United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs reaffirmed this observation and also highlighted the slow progress in meeting the 2011 Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases and the third Sustainable Development Goal. Lack of situational analyses, priority setting, and budgeting have been identified as major obstacles in achieving these goals. All of these have in common that they require information on the local cancer epidemiology. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is uniquely poised to provide these crucial data. Objective: To describe cancer burden for 29 cancer groups in 195 countries from 1990 through 2017 to provide data needed for cancer control planning. Evidence Review: We used the GBD study estimation methods to describe cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-Adjusted life-years (DALYs). Results are presented at the national level as well as by Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator of income, educational attainment, and total fertility rate. We also analyzed the influence of the epidemiological vs the demographic transition on cancer incidence. Findings: In 2017, there were 24.5 million incident cancer cases worldwide (16.8 million without nonmelanoma skin cancer [NMSC]) and 9.6 million cancer deaths. The majority of cancer DALYs came from years of life lost (97%), and only 3% came from years lived with disability. The odds of developing cancer were the lowest in the low SDI quintile (1 in 7) and the highest in the high SDI quintile (1 in 2) for both sexes. In 2017, the most common incident cancers in men were NMSC (4.3 million incident cases); tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer (1.5 million incident cases); and prostate cancer (1.3 million incident cases). The most common causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for men were TBL cancer (1.3 million deaths and 28.4 million DALYs), liver cancer (572000 deaths and 15.2 million DALYs), and stomach cancer (542000 deaths and 12.2 million DALYs). For women in 2017, the most common incident cancers were NMSC (3.3 million incident cases), breast cancer (1.9 million incident cases), and colorectal cancer (819000 incident cases). The leading causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for women were breast cancer (601000 deaths and 17.4 million DALYs), TBL cancer (596000 deaths and 12.6 million DALYs), and colorectal cancer (414000 deaths and 8.3 million DALYs). Conclusions and Relevance: The national epidemiological profiles of cancer burden in the GBD study show large heterogeneities, which are a reflection of different exposures to risk factors, economic settings, lifestyles, and access to care and screening. The GBD study can be used by policy makers and other stakeholders to develop and improve national and local cancer control in order to achieve the global targets and improve equity in cancer care. © 2019 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
  • Adusei-Mensah, Frank; Essumang, David Kofi; Agjei, Richard Osei; Kauhanen, Jussi; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina; Ekor, Martins (2019)
  • Seppälä, Laura K.; Madanat-Harjuoja, Laura-Maria; Leinonen, Maarit K.; Lääperi, Mitja; Vettenranta, Kim (2021)
    Simple Summary:& nbsp;Maternal thyroid disease, especially hypothyroidism, is known to affect pregnancy and its outcome. We evaluated the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring following exposure to maternal thyroid disease in a case-control setting using registry data. In our study, maternal hypothyroidism was associated with an increased risk of lymphoma in the offspring. The association remained stable when possible familial cancers were excluded.Maternal thyroid disease, especially hypothyroidism, affects pregnancy and its outcome. In-utero exposure to autoimmune thyroid disease has been reported to associate with childhood ALL in the offspring. We evaluated the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring following exposure to maternal thyroid disease in a case-control setting using registry data. All patients with their first cancer diagnosis below the age of 20 years were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry (n = 2037) and matched for sex and birth year at a 1:5 ratio to population controls identified from the Medical Birth Registry (n = 10,185). We collected national information on maternal thyroid disease from the Medical Birth Registry, Care Register for Health Care, Register for Reimbursed Drug Purchases and Register of Special Reimbursements. We used conditional logistic regression to analyze childhood cancer risk in the offspring. The adjusted OR for any childhood cancer was 1.41 (95%, CI 1.00-2.00) comparing the offspring of mothers with hypothyroidism and those with normal thyroid function. The risk of lymphomas was increased (adjusted OR for maternal hypothyroidism 3.66, 95%, CI 1.29-10.38). The results remained stable when mothers with cancer history were excluded from the analyses. Maternal hypothyroidism appears to be associated with an increased risk for childhood lymphoma in the offspring. The association exists even after excluding possible familial cancers.
  • Yu, Hongyao; Frank, Christopher; Hemminki, A.; Sundquist, Kristiina; Hemminki, K. (2017)
    Familial risks of lung cancer are well-established, but whether lung cancer clusters with other discordant cancers is less certain, particularly beyond smoking-related sites, which may provide evidence on genetic contributions to lung cancer aetiology. We used a novel approach to search for familial associations in the Swedish Family-Cancer Database. This involved assessment of familial relative risk for cancer X in families with increasing numbers of lung cancer patients and, conversely, relative risks for lung cancer in families with increasing numbers of patients with cancers X. However, we lacked information on smoking. The total number of lung cancers in the database was 125 563. We applied stringent statistical criteria and found that seven discordant cancers were associated with lung cancer among family members, and six of these were known to be connected with smoking: oesophageal, upper aerodigestive tract, liver, cervical, kidney and urinary bladder cancers. A further novel finding was that cancer of unknown primary also associated with lung cancer. We also factored in histological evidence and found that anal and connective tissue cancers could be associated with lung cancer for reasons other than smoking. For endometrial and prostate cancers, suggestive negative associations with lung cancer were found. Although we lacked information on smoking it is prudent to conclude that practically all observed discordant associations of lung cancer were with cancers for which smoking is a risk factor. © ERS 2017.
  • Zheng, Guoqiao; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Försti, Asta; Hemminki, Akseli; Hemminki, Kari (2020)
    Background Many cancers are increased in immunosuppressed patients and evidence is accumulating that immune dysfunction may be a contributing risk factor for second primary cancers (SPCs). The aim of this study was to explore the potential influence of immune mechanisms in SPC. Methods We used the Swedish Cancer Registry (1990-2015) to select 13 male and 14 female first primary cancers (FPCs) that are known to be related to immune suppression. We assessed relative risks (RRs) for any of these as concordant (same first and second cancer) and discordant FPC-SPC pairs. Hierarchical clustering of significant RRs was performed for cancers as FPC and SPC. Results Concordant risks for SPCs were excessive in men and women for nasal (RRs 59.3 for men and 150.6 for women), tongue/mouth (51.7 and 100.8), and lip (32.4 and 61.2) cancers. Heatmaps showed that some cancers, such as skin cancer, tongue/mouth cancers, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma had multiple bidirectional associations as FPC and SPC. Nasal cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia had associations mainly as FPC while liver and kidney cancers showed most associations as SPC. Conclusions Immune dysfunction may be a plausible contributing factor for most of the associations, which calls for experimental verification.