Browsing by Subject "childhood cancer"

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  • Niemelä, Jussi; Ylänen, Kaisa; Suominen, Anu; Pushparajah, Kuberan; Mathur, Sujeev; Sarkola, Taisto; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Eerola, Anneli; Poutanen, Tuija; Vettenranta, Kim; Ojala, Tiina (2021)
    Background: The majority of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) have been exposed to cardiotoxic treatments and often present with modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. Our aim was to evaluate the value of left ventricular (LV) longitudinal strain for increasing the sensitivity of cardiac dysfunction detection among CCSs. Methods: We combined two national cohorts: neuroblastoma and other childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracyclines. The final data consisted of 90 long-term CCSs exposed to anthracyclines and/or high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue and followed up for > 5 years and their controls (n = 86). LV longitudinal strain was assessed with speckle tracking (Qlab) and LV ejection fraction (EF) by three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). Results: Of the CCSs, 11% (10/90) had abnormal LV longitudinal strain (i.e., < -17.5%); of those, 70% (7/10) had normal 3DE LV EF. Multivariable linear model analysis demonstrated that follow-up time (p = 0.027), sex (p = 0.020), and BMI (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with LV longitudinal strain. Conversely, cardiac risk group, hypertension, age, cumulative anthracycline dose or exposure to chest radiation were not. Conclusion: LV longitudinal strain is a more sensitive method than LV EF for the detection of cardiac dysfunction among CCSs. Therefore, LV longitudinal strain should be added to the screening panel, especially for those with modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.
  • Pampanini, Valentina; Wagner, Magdalena; Asadi-Azarbaijani, Babak; Oskam, Irma C.; Sheikhi, Mona; Sjödin, Marcus O. D.; Lindberg, Johan; Hovatta, Outi; Sahlin, Lena; Bjorvang, Richelle D.; Otala, Marjut; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Jahnukainen, Kirsi (2019)
    STUDY QUESTION: Does first-line chemotherapy affect the quality of ovarian pre-antral follicles and stromal tissue in a population of young patients? SUMMARY ANSWER: Exposure to first-line chemotherapy significantly impacts follicle viability, size of residual intact follicles, steroid secretion in culture and quality of the stromal compartment. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: First-line chemotherapy is considered to have a low gonadotoxic potential, and as such, does not represent an indication for fertility preservation. Studies investigating the effects of chemotherapy on the quality of ovarian tissue stored for fertility preservation in young patients are limited and the results sometimes contradictory. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: We conducted a retrospective cohort study including young patients referred to three centers (Helsinki, Oslo and Tampere) to perform ovarian tissue cryopreservation for fertility preservation between 2003 and 2018. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: A total of 43 patients (age 1-24 years) were included in the study. A total of 25 were exposed to first-line chemotherapy before cryopreservation, whereas 18 patients were not. Density and size of follicles divided by developmental stages, prevalence of atretic follicles, health of the stromal compartment and functionality of the tissue in culture were evaluated and related to age and chemotherapy exposure. Activation of dormant follicles and DNA damage were also assessed. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: Patients exposed to first-line chemotherapy showed a significantly higher density of atretic primordial and intermediary follicles than untreated patients. The intact primordial and intermediary follicles were significantly smaller in size in patients exposed to chemotherapy. Production of steroids in culture was also significantly impaired and a higher content of collagen and DNA damage was observed in the stromal compartment of treated patients. Collectively, these observations may indicate reduced quality and developmental capacity of follicles as a consequence of first-line chemotherapy exposure. Neither increased activation of dormant follicles nor elevated levels of DNA damage in oocyte nuclei were found in patients exposed to chemotherapy. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The two groups were not homogeneous in terms of age and the patients were exposed to different treatments, which did not allow us to distinguish the effect of specific agents. The limited material availability did not allow us to perform all the analyses on the entire set of patients. WIDER IMPLICATION OF THE FINDINGS: This study provides for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the effects of first-line chemotherapy on the health, density and functionality of follicles categorized according to the developmental stage in patients under 24 years of age. When exposed to these treatments, patients were considered at low/medium risk of infertility. Our data suggest a profound impact of these relatively safe therapies on ovarian health and encourages further exploration of this effect in follow-up studies in order to optimize fertility preservation for young cancer patients.
  • Seppälä, Laura K.; Vettenranta, Kim; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Hirvonen, Elli; Leinonen, Maarit K.; Madanat-Harjuoja, Laura-Maria (2020)
    An association between maternal diabetes, its medication and childhood cancer has not been previously explored in a registry-based setting. With a case-control design, we aimed to explore whether maternal diabetes is associated with an increased risk of childhood cancer in the offspring. Combining data from population-based registries, we analyzed a total of 2,029 cases, i.e. persons with childhood cancer diagnosed under the age of 20?years between years 1996-2014 and a total of 10,103 matched population controls. The mothers of the cases/controls and their diagnoses of diabetes (DM) before/during pregnancy as well as their insulin/metformin prescriptions during pregnancy were identified. Conditional logistic regression modelling was used to analyze the risk of childhood cancer. The OR for childhood cancer among those exposed to any maternal diabetes was 1.32 (95% CI 1.14-1.54) compared to the offspring of the non-diabetic mothers. The effect of maternal diabetes on the risk of childhood cancer remained elevated even after adjusting for maternal age, parity and smoking. Our data suggest that maternal diabetes medication may reduce the risk for childhood cancer (adjusted OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.36-1.94), especially in gestational diabetes (adjusted OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.05-1.25), compared to the diabetic mothers without medication. The risk of childhood leukemia was significantly higher among children exposed to any maternal diabetes (OR 1.36, CI 1.04-1.77) compared to the unexposed. Maternal diabetes appears to be associated with an increased risk of childhood cancer in the offspring. The possible risk-reducing effect of an exposure to diabetes medication on offspring cancer risk warrants further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • Seppälä, Laura K.; Madanat-Harjuoja, Laura-Maria; Leinonen, Maarit K.; Lääperi, Mitja; Vettenranta, Kim (2021)
    Simple Summary:& nbsp;Maternal thyroid disease, especially hypothyroidism, is known to affect pregnancy and its outcome. We evaluated the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring following exposure to maternal thyroid disease in a case-control setting using registry data. In our study, maternal hypothyroidism was associated with an increased risk of lymphoma in the offspring. The association remained stable when possible familial cancers were excluded.Maternal thyroid disease, especially hypothyroidism, affects pregnancy and its outcome. In-utero exposure to autoimmune thyroid disease has been reported to associate with childhood ALL in the offspring. We evaluated the risk of childhood cancer in the offspring following exposure to maternal thyroid disease in a case-control setting using registry data. All patients with their first cancer diagnosis below the age of 20 years were identified from the Finnish Cancer Registry (n = 2037) and matched for sex and birth year at a 1:5 ratio to population controls identified from the Medical Birth Registry (n = 10,185). We collected national information on maternal thyroid disease from the Medical Birth Registry, Care Register for Health Care, Register for Reimbursed Drug Purchases and Register of Special Reimbursements. We used conditional logistic regression to analyze childhood cancer risk in the offspring. The adjusted OR for any childhood cancer was 1.41 (95%, CI 1.00-2.00) comparing the offspring of mothers with hypothyroidism and those with normal thyroid function. The risk of lymphomas was increased (adjusted OR for maternal hypothyroidism 3.66, 95%, CI 1.29-10.38). The results remained stable when mothers with cancer history were excluded from the analyses. Maternal hypothyroidism appears to be associated with an increased risk for childhood lymphoma in the offspring. The association exists even after excluding possible familial cancers.
  • ALiCCS study group; Oskarsson, Trausti; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Bautz, Andrea; Madanat-Harjuoja, Laura; Falck Winther, Jeanette (2021)
    The dynamic growth of the skeleton during childhood and adolescence renders it vulnerable to adverse effects of cancer treatment. The lifetime risk and patterns of skeletal morbidity have not been described in a population-based cohort of childhood cancer survivors. A cohort of 26 334 1-year cancer survivors diagnosed before 20 years of age was identified from the national cancer registries of Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Sweden as well as a cohort of 127 531 age- and sex-matched comparison subjects randomly selected from the national population registries in each country. The two cohorts were linked with data from the national hospital registries and the observed numbers of first-time hospital admissions for adverse skeletal outcomes among childhood cancer survivors were compared to the expected numbers derived from the comparison cohort. In total, 1987 childhood cancer survivors had at least one hospital admission with a skeletal adverse event as discharge diagnosis, yielding a rate ratio (RR) of 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.42). Among the survivors, we observed an increased risk for osteonecrosis with a RR of 25.9 (15.0-44.5), osteoporosis, RR 4.53 (3.28-6.27), fractures, RR 1.27 (1.20-1.34), osteochondropathies, RR 1.57 (1.28-1.92) and osteoarthrosis, RR 1.48 (1.28-1.72). The hospitalization risk for any skeletal adverse event was higher among survivors up to the age of 60 years, but the lifetime pattern was different for each type of skeletal adverse event. Understanding the different lifetime patterns and identification of high-risk groups is crucial for developing strategies to optimize skeletal health in childhood cancer survivors.
  • Stukenborg, J. -B.; Alves-Lopes, J. P.; Kurek, M.; Albalushi, H.; Reda, A.; Keros, V.; Töhönen, V.; Bjarnason, R.; Romerius, P.; Sundin, M.; Nyström, U. Noren; Langenskiöld, C.; Vogt, H.; Henningsohn, L.; Mitchell, R. T.; Söder, O.; Petersen, C.; Jahnukainen, K. (2018)
    STUDY QUESTION: Does chemotherapy exposure (with or without alkylating agents) or primary diagnosis affect spermatogonial quantity in human prepubertal testicular tissue? SUMMARY ANSWER: Spermatogonial quantity is significantly reduced in testes of prepubertal boys treated with alkylating agent therapies or with hydroxyurea for sickle cell disease. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Cryopreservation of spermatogonial stem cells, followed by transplantation into the testis after treatment, is a proposed clinical option for fertility restoration in children. The key clinical consideration behind this approach is a sufficient quantity of healthy cryopreserved spermatogonia. However, since most boys with malignancies start therapy with agents that are not potentially sterilizing, they will have already received some chemotherapy before testicular tissue cryopreservation is considered. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: We examined histological sections of prepubertal testicular tissue to elucidate whether chemotherapy exposure or primary diagnosis affects spermatogonial quantity. Quantity of spermatogonia per transverse tubular cross-section (S/T) was assessed in relation to treatment characteristics and normative reference values in histological sections of paraffin embedded testicular tissue samples collected from 32 consecutive boy patients (aged 6.3 +/- 3.8 [mean +/- SD] years) between 2014 and 2017, as part of the NORDFERTIL study, and in 14 control samples (from boys aged 5.6 +/- 5.0 [mean +/- SD] years) from an internal biobank. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS: Prepubertal boys in Sweden, Finland and Iceland who were facing treatments associated with a very high risk of infertility, were offered the experimental procedure of testicular cryopreservation. Exclusion criteria were testicular volumes > 10 ml and high bleeding or infection risk. There were 18 patients with a diagnosis of malignancy and 14 patients a nonmalignant diagnosis. While 20 patients had the testicular biopsy performed 1-45 days after chemotherapy, 12 patients had not received any chemotherapy. In addition, 14 testicular tissue samples of patients with no reported testicular pathology, obtained from the internal biobank of the Department of Pathology at Karolinska University Hospital, were included as control samples in addition to reference values obtained from a recently published meta-analysis. The quantity of spermatogonia was assessed by both morphological and immunohistochemical analysis. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: The main finding was a significant reduction in spermatogonial cell counts in boys treated with alkylating agents or with hydroxyurea for sickle cell disease. The mean S/T values in boys exposed to alkylating agents (0.2 +/- 0.3, n = 6) or in boys with sickle cell disease and exposed to hydroxyurea (0.3 +/- 0.6, n = 6) were significantly lower (P = 0.003 and P = 0.008, respectively) than in a group exposed to non-alkylating agents or in biobank control samples (1.7 +/- 1.0, n = 8 and 4.1 +/- 4.6, n = 14, respectively). The mean S/T values of the testicular tissue samples included in the biobank control group and the patient group exposed to nonalkylating agents were within recently published normative reference values. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: Normal testicular tissue samples included in this study were obtained from the internal biobank of Karolinska University Hospital. Samples were considered normal and included in the study if no testicular pathology was reported in the analysed samples. However, detailed information regarding previous medical treatments and testicular volumes of patients included in this biobank were not available. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS: This study summarizes, for the first time, spermatogonial quantity in a prepubertal patient cohort just before and after potentially sterilizing treatments. Boys facing cancer and cytotoxic therapies are regarded as the major group who will benefit from novel fertility preservation techniques. There are no previous reports correlating spermatogonial quantity to cumulative exposure to alkylating agents and anthracyclines (non-alkylating agents) and no information about the timing of cytotoxic exposures among this particular patient cohort. For prepubertal boys in whom fertility preservation is indicated, testicular tissue should be obtained before initiation of chemotherapy with alkylating agents, whilst for those with sickle cell disease and treated with hydroxyurea, this approach to fertility preservation may not be feasible. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S): This study was supported by grants from The Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation (PR2016-0124; TJ2016-0093; PR2015-0073, TJ2015-0046) (J.-B.S. and K.J.), the Jane and Dan Olssons Foundation (2016-33) (J.-B.S.), the Finnish Cancer Society (K.J.), the Foundation for Paediatric Research (J.-B.S.), Kronprinsessan Lovisas Forening For Barnasjukvard/Stiftelsen Axel Tielmans Minnesfond, Samariten Foundation (J.-B.S.), the Vare Foundation for Paediatric Cancer Research (K.J.) and the Swedish Research Council (2012-6352) (O.S.). R.T.M. was supported by a Wellcome Trust Fellowship (09822). J.P.A.-L. and M.K. were supported by the ITN Marie Curie program 'Growsperm' (EU-FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN 603568). The authors declare no conflicts of interest.
  • Ljungman, Lisa; Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Lampic, Claudia; Wettergren, Lena (2020)
    Background: This study protocol describes the Fex-Can Childhood project, comprising two studies: The Fex-Can Childhood observational study (OS) and the Fex-Can Childhood randomized controlled trial (RCT). The Fex-Can Childhood OS aims to determine the prevalence and predictors of sexual dysfunction and fertility-related distress in young adult childhood cancer survivors (aged 19-40) compared to an age matched comparison group; the Fex-Can Childhood RCT will evaluate the effect of a web-based psycho-educational intervention (Fex-Can intervention) on sexual dysfunction and fertility-related distress. Methods: The Fex-Can Childhood OS will have a population-based cross-sectional design. All individuals treated for childhood cancer in Sweden at the age of 0 to 17 years (current age 19-40) will be identified through the National Quality Registry for Childhood Cancer. Established self-reported instruments will be used to measure sexual function, fertility-related distress, body image, anxiety and depression, and health-related quality of life. Self-efficacy related to sexual function and fertility, and fertility-related knowledge, will be assessed by study-specific measures. Clinical variables will be collected from the registry. Results will be compared to an age-matched comparison group from the general population. Participants in the Fex-Can Childhood OS who report a high level of sexual dysfunction and/or fertility-related distress will be invited to participate in the RCT. The Fex-Can intervention comprises two programs: The Fex-Can Sex and the Fex-Can Fertility targeting sexual dysfunction and fertility-related distress, respectively. The control condition will be a wait-list. Sexual function and fertility-related distress will be the primary outcomes. The secondary outcomes include body image, anxiety and depression, health-related quality of life and self-efficacy related to sexual function and fertility. Post- and follow-up assessments will be conducted directly after end of intervention (primary end point), at 3 months and 6 months after end of intervention. Additionally, a process-evaluation including study-specific items and a qualitative interview will be conducted. Discussion: The Fex-Can Childhood project will advance knowledge in the areas of sexual function and fertility-related distress among young adult survivors of childhood cancer. If the Fex-Can intervention proves to be efficacious, steps will be taken to implement it in the follow-up care provided to this population.