Browsing by Subject "clinical trials"

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  • Eskelund, Christian W.; Kolstad, Arne; Jerkeman, Mats; Räty, Riikka; Laurell, Anna; Eloranta, Sandra; Smedby, Karin E.; Husby, Simon; Pedersen, Lone B.; Andersen, Niels S.; Eriksson, Mikael; Kimby, Eva; Bentzen, Hans; Kuittinen, Outi; Lauritzsen, Grete F.; Nilsson-Ehle, Herman; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Ehinger, Mats; Sundstrom, Christer; Delabie, Jan; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Workman, Christopher T.; Garde, Christian; Elonen, Erkki; Brown, Peter; Gronbaek, Kirsten; Geisler, Christian H. (2016)
    In recent decades, the prognosis of Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) has been significantly improved by intensified first-line regimens containing cytarabine, rituximab and consolidation with high-dose-therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. One such strategy is the Nordic MCL2 regimen, developed by the Nordic Lymphoma Group. We here present the 15-year updated results of the Nordic MCL2 study after a median follow-up of 114years: For all patients on an intent-to-treat basis, the median overall and progression-free survival was 127 and 85years, respectively. The MCL International Prognostic Index (MIPI), biological MIPI, including Ki67 expression (MIPI-B) and the MIPI-B including mIR-18b expression (MIPI-B-miR), in particular, significantly divided patients into distinct risk groups. Despite very long response durations of the low and intermediate risk groups, we observed a continuous pattern of relapse and the survival curves never reached a plateau. In conclusion, despite half of the patients being still alive and 40% in first remission after more than 12years, we still see an excess disease-related mortality, even among patients experiencing long remissions. Even though we consider the Nordic regimen as a very good choice of regimen, we recommend inclusion in prospective studies to explore the benefit of novel agents in the frontline treatment of MCL.
  • Saellstrom, Sara; Sadeghi, Arian; Eriksson, Emma; Segall, Thomas; Dimopoulou, Maria; Korsgren, Olle; Loskog, Angelica SI.; Totterman, Thomas H.; Hemminki, Akseli; Ronnberg, Henrik (2021)
    Malignant melanoma is a serious disease in both humans and dogs, and the high metastatic potential results in poor prognosis for many patients. Its similarities with human melanoma make spontaneous canine melanoma an excellent model for comparative studies of novel therapies and tumor biology. Gene therapy using adenoviruses encoding the immunostimulatory gene CD40L (AdCD40L) has shown promise in initial clinical trials enrolling human patients with various malignancies including melanoma. We report a study of local AdCD40L treatment in 32 cases of canine melanoma (23 oral, 5 cutaneous, 3 ungual and 1 conjunctival). Eight patients were World Health Organization (WHO) stage I, 9 were stage II, 12 stage III, and 3 stage IV. One to six intratumoral injections of AdCD40L were given every seven days, combined with cytoreductive surgery in 20 cases and only immunotherapy in 12 cases. Tumor tissue was infiltrated with T and B lymphocytes after treatment, suggesting immune stimulation. The best overall response based on result of immunotherapy included 7 complete responses, 5 partial responses, 5 stable and 2 progressive disease statuses according to the World Health Organization response criteria. Median survival was 285 days (range 20-3435 d). Our results suggest that local AdCD40L therapy is safe and could have beneficial effects in dogs, supporting further treatment development. Clinical translation to human patients is ongoing.
  • Pfaar, O; Klimek, L; Jutel, M; Akdis, C A; Bousquet, J; Breiteneder, H; Chinthrajah, S; Diamant, Z; Eiwegger, T; Fokkens, W J; Fritsch, H W; Nadeau, K C; O'Hehir, R E; O'Mahony, L; Rief, W; Sampath, V; Schedlowski, M; Torres, M; Traidl-Hoffmann, C; Wang, D Y; Zhang, L; Bonini, M; Brehler, R; Brough, H A; Chivato, T; Del Giacco, S; Dramburg, S; Gawlik, R; Gelincik, A; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, K; Hox, V; Knol, E; Lauerma, A; Matricardi, P M; Mortz, C G; Ollert, M; Palomares, O; Riggioni, C; Schwarze, J; Skypala, I; Untersmayr, S; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Ansotegui, I; Bachert, C; Bedbrook, A; Bosnic-Anticevich, S; Brussino, L; Canonica, G W; Cardona, V; Carreiro-Martins, P; Cruz, A A; Czarlewski, W; Fonseca, J A; Gotua, M; Haahtela, T; Ivancevich, J C; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Larenas-Linnemann, D; Latiff, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Mullol, J; Naclerio, R; Ohta, K; Okamoto, Y; Onorato, G L; Papadopoulos, N G; Patella, V; Regateiro, F S; Samolinski, B; Suppli Ulrik, C; Toppila-Salmi, S; Valiulis, A; Ventura, M T; Yorgancioglu, A; Zuberbier, T; Agache, I (2021)
    BackgroundThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has evolved into a pandemic infectious disease transmitted by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Allergists and other healthcare providers (HCPs) in the field of allergies and associated airway diseases are on the front line, taking care of patients potentially infected with SARS-CoV-2. Hence, strategies and practices to minimize risks of infection for both HCPs and treated patients have to be developed and followed by allergy clinics. MethodThe scientific information on COVID-19 was analysed by a literature search in MEDLINE, PubMed, the National and International Guidelines from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the Cochrane Library, and the internet. ResultsBased on the diagnostic and treatment standards developed by EAACI, on international information regarding COVID-19, on guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO) and other international organizations, and on previous experience, a panel of experts including clinicians, psychologists, IT experts, and basic scientists along with EAACI and the "Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma (ARIA)" initiative have developed recommendations for the optimal management of allergy clinics during the current COVID-19 pandemic. These recommendations are grouped into nine sections on different relevant aspects for the care of patients with allergies. ConclusionsThis international Position Paper provides recommendations on operational plans and procedures to maintain high standards in the daily clinical care of allergic patients while ensuring the necessary safety measures in the current COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Barker, Roger A.; Björklund, Anders; Gash, Don M.; Whone, Alan; Laar, Amber Van; Kordower, Jeffrey H.; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Kieburtz, Karl; Saarma, Mart; Booms, Sigrid; Huttunen, Henri J.; Kells, Adrian P.; Fiandaca, Massimo S.; Stoessl, A. Jon; Eidelberg, David; Federoff, Howard; Voutilainen, Merja H.; Dexter, David T.; Eberling, Jamie; Brundin, Patrik; Isaacs, Lyndsey; Mursaleen, Leah; Bresolin, Eros; Carroll, Camille; Coles, Alasdair; Fiske, Brian; Matthews, Helen; Lungu, Codrin; Wyse, Richard K.; Stott, Simon; Lang, Anthony E. (2020)
    The concept of repairing the brain with growth factors has been pursued for many years in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including primarily Parkinson's disease (PD) using glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). This neurotrophic factor was discovered in 1993 and shown to have selective effects on promoting survival and regeneration of certain populations of neurons including the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway. These observations led to a series of clinical trials in PD patients including using infusions or gene delivery of GDNF or the related growth factor, neurturin (NRTN). Initial studies, some of which were open label, suggested that this approach could be of value in PD when the agent was injected into the putamen rather than the cerebral ventricles. In subsequent double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, the most recent reporting in 2019, treatment with GDNF did not achieve its primary end point. As a result, there has been uncertainty as to whether GDNF (and by extrapolation, related GDNF family neurotrophic factors) has merit in the future treatment of PD. To critically appraise the existing work and its future, a special workshop was held to discuss and debate this issue. This paper is a summary of that meeting with recommendations on whether there is a future for this therapeutic approach and also what any future PD trial involving GDNF and other GDNF family neurotrophic factors should consider in its design.
  • Tuomainen, Katja; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Potdar, Swapnil; Turunen, Laura; Turunen, Minna; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Bergman, Paula; Risteli, Maija; Åström, Pirjo; Tiikkaja, Riia; Grenman, Reidar; Wennerberg, Krister; Monni, Outi; Salo, Tuula (2020)
    In vitro cancer drug testing carries a low predictive value. We developed the human leiomyoma-derived matrix "Myogel" to better mimic the human tumor microenvironment (TME). We hypothesized that Myogel could provide an appropriate microenvironment for cancer cells, thereby allowing more in vivo-relevant drug testing. We screened 19 anticancer compounds, targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), MEK, and PI3K/mTOR on 12 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines cultured on plastic, mouse sarcoma-derived Matrigel (MSDM), and Myogel. We applied a high-throughput drug screening assay under five different culturing conditions: cells in two-dimensional (2D) plastic wells and on top or embedded in Matrigel or Myogel. We then compared the efficacy of the anticancer compounds to the response rates of 19 HNSCC monotherapy clinical trials. Cancer cells on top of Myogel responded less to EGFR and MEK inhibitors compared to cells cultured on plastic or Matrigel. However, we found a similar response to the PI3K/mTOR inhibitors under all culturing conditions. Cells grown on Myogel more closely resembled the response rates reported in EGFR-inhibitor monotherapy clinical trials. Our findings suggest that a human tumor matrix improves the predictability of in vitro anticancer drug testing compared to current 2D and MSDM methods.
  • Jong, Monica; Jonas, Jost B.; Wolffsohn, James S.; Berntsen, David A.; Cho, Pauline; Clarkson-Townsend, Danielle; Flitcroft, Daniel I.; Gifford, Kate L.; Haarman, Annechien E. G.; Pardue, Machelle T.; Richdale, Kathryn; Sankaridurg, Padmaja; Tedja, Milly S.; Wildsoet, Christine F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; MacGregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Musolf, Anthony M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Vitart, Veronique; Smith, Earl L. (2021)
    PURPOSE. The International Myopia Institute (IMI) Yearly Digest highlights new research considered to be of importance since the publication of the first series of IMI white papers. METHODS. A literature search was conducted for articles on myopia between 2019 and mid-2020 to inform definitions and classifications, experimental models, genetics, interventions, clinical trials, and clinical management. Conference abstracts from key meetings in the same period were also considered. RESULTS. One thousand articles on myopia have been published between 2019 and mid-2020. Key advances include the use of the definition of premyopia in studies currently under way to test interventions in myopia, new definitions in the field of pathologicmyopia, the role of new pharmacologic treatments in experimental models such as intraocular pressure-lowering latanoprost, a large meta-analysis of refractive error identifying 336 new genetic loci, new clinical interventions such as the defocus incorporated multisegment spectacles and combination therapy with low-dose atropine and orthokeratology (OK), normative standards in refractive error, the ethical dilemma of a placebo control group when myopia control treatments are established, reporting the physical metric of myopia reduction versus a percentage reduction, comparison of the risk of pediatric OK wear with risk of vision impairment in myopia, the justification of preventing myopic and axial length increase versus quality of life, and future vision loss. CONCLUSIONS. Large amounts of research in myopia have been published since the IMI 2019 white papers were released. The yearly digest serves to highlight the latest research and advances in myopia.
  • Hemilä, Harri (1996)
    In 1971, Linus Pauling carried out a meta-analysis of four placebo-controlled trials and concluded that it was highly unlikely that the decrease in the "integrated morbidity of the common cold" in vitamin C groups was caused by chance alone (P < 0.00003). Studies carried out since then have consistently found that vitamin C (> or = 1 g/d) alleviates common cold symptoms, indicating that the vitamin does indeed have physiologic effects on colds. However, widespread conviction that the vitamin has no proven effects on the common cold still remains. Three of the most influential reviews drawing this conclusion are considered in the present article. Two of them are cited in the current edition of the RDA nutritional recommendations as evidence that vitamin C is ineffective against colds. In this article, these three reviews are shown to contain serious inaccuracies and shortcomings, making them unreliable sources on the topic. The second purpose is to suggest possible conceptual reasons for the persistent resistance to the notion that vitamin C might have effects on colds. Although placebo-controlled trials have shown that vitamin C does alleviate common cold symptoms, important questions still remain.