Browsing by Subject "colorectal neoplasms"

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  • Lunkka, Pipsa; Malila, Nea; Ryynänen, Heidi; Heikkinen, Sanna; Sallinen, Ville; Koskenvuo, Laura (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Background: The population-based Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) is an important resource for research and healthcare politics in Finland. The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of the colorectal cancer (CRC) data within the FCR. Material and Methods: FCR data is based on independent cancer report forms (CRFs) from both clinicians and pathologists. Data from patients diagnosed with CRC during a randomized, population-based CRC screening program between 2004 and 2012 were extracted from the FCR and compared to data extracted from the original clinical patient records of these individuals by two gastrointestinal surgeons. The study focused on tumour characteristics and primary treatment. Accuracy was measured by calculating Cohen´s kappa coefficient (k), which considers the possibility of agreement by chance. Results: Altogether, 1475 patients were studied. k was 0.74 for stage, 0.87 for tumour location (right/left), 0.78 for a more detailed location, 0.72 for tumour histology, 0.46 for surgical removal of the primary tumour, and 0.43 for chemotherapy. Among those who underwent surgery, the radicality of surgical treatment had a k of 0.24. In total, 173 (12%) patients were lacking a CRF from a clinician. Conclusion: The FCR data had good accuracy regarding tumour characteristics, but poor accuracy in treatment information. The main reason for this suboptimal accuracy was missing CRFs from treating clinicians. Awareness of these findings is crucial when research and decision making is based on FCR data. Measures have since been taken to improve the completeness of FCR recording.
  • Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Meplan, Catherine; Jones, Jeb S.; Zhu, Wanzhe; Schomburg, Lutz; Siddiq, Afshan; Hybsier, Sandra; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Omichessan, Hanane; Perduca, Vittorio; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Kuehn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Karakatsani, Anna; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Tumino, Rosario; Panico, Salvatore; Masala, Giovanna; Agnoli, Claudia; Naccarati, Alessio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Nost, Therese Haugdahl; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Ramon Quiros, J.; Maria Huerta, Jose; Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gylling, Bjoern; Harlid, Sophia; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc; Murphy, Neil; Freisling, Heinz; Tsilidis, Kostas; Aune, Dagfinn; Riboli, Elio; Hesketh, John E.; Hughes, David J. (2019)
    Selenoprotein genetic variations and suboptimal selenium (Se) levels may contribute to the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) development. We examined the association between CRC risk and genotype for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selenoprotein and Se metabolic pathway genes. Illumina Goldengate assays were designed and resulted in the genotyping of 1040 variants in 154 genes from 1420 cases and 1421 controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Multivariable logistic regression revealed an association of 144 individual SNPs from 63 Se pathway genes with CRC risk. However, regarding the selenoprotein genes, only TXNRD1 rs11111979 retained borderline statistical significance after adjustment for correlated tests (P-ACT = 0.10; P-ACT significance threshold was P <0.1). SNPs in Wingless/Integrated (Wnt) and Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta-signaling genes (FRZB, SMAD3, SMAD7) from pathways affected by Se intake were also associated with CRC risk after multiple testing adjustments. Interactions with Se status (using existing serum Se and Selenoprotein P data) were tested at the SNP, gene, and pathway levels. Pathway analyses using the modified Adaptive Rank Truncated Product method suggested that genes and gene x Se status interactions in antioxidant, apoptosis, and TGF-beta signaling pathways may be associated with CRC risk. This study suggests that SNPs in the Se pathway alone or in combination with suboptimal Se status may contribute to CRC development.
  • Tanskanen, Tomas (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Objective. Early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC), defined here as age of onset less than 40 years, develops frequently in genetically predisposed individuals. Next-generation sequencing is an increasingly available option in the diagnostic workup of suspected hereditary susceptibility, but little is known about the practical feasibility and additional diagnostic yield of the technology in this patient group. Materials and methods. We analyzed 38 young CRC patients derived from a set of 1514 CRC cases. All 38 tumors had been tested in our laboratory for microsatellite instability (MSI), and Sanger sequencing had been used to screen for MLH1 and MSH2 mutations in MSI cases. Also, gastrointestinal polyposis had been diagnosed clinically and molecularly. Family histories were acquired from national registries. If inherited syndromes had not been diagnosed in routine diagnostic efforts (n = 23), normal tissue DNA was analyzed for mutations in a comprehensive set of high-penetrance genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD4, BMPR1A, LKB1/STK11, and PTEN) by exome sequencing. Results. CRC predisposition syndromes were confirmed in 42% (16/38) of early-onset CRC patients. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 12 (32%) patients, familial adenomatous polyposis in three (7.9%), and juvenile polyposis in one (2.6%) patient. Exome sequencing revealed one additional MLH1 mutation. Over half of the patients had advanced cancers (Dukes C or D, 61%, 23/38). The majority of nonsyndromic patients had unaffected first-degree relatives and microsatellite-stable tumors. Conclusions. Microsatellite instability positivity or gastrointestinal polyposis characterized all patients with unambiguous highly penetrant germline mutations. In our series, exome sequencing produced little added value in diagnosing the underlying predisposition conditions.