Browsing by Subject "cytoskeleton"

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  • Revesz, Csaba; Wasik, Anita A.; Godo, Maria; Tod, Pal; Lehtonen, Sanna; Szenasi, Gabor; Hamar, Peter (2021)
    Background: Organ protection for transplantation is perfusion with ice-cold preservation solutions, although saline is also used in animal experiments and living donor transplantations. However, ice-cold perfusion can contribute to initial graft injury. Our aim was to test if cytoskeletal damage of parenchymal cells is caused by saline itself or by the ice-cold solution. Methods: F344 rat kidneys were flushed with cold (4 degrees C) saline, ischemic and sham kidneys were not perfused. In a separate set, F344 kidneys were flushed with saline or preservation solution at 4 or 15 degrees C. Ischemia time was 30 min. Results: Renal injury was significantly more severe following cold ischemia (CI) than after ischemia-reperfusion without flushing (ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)). Functional and morphologic damage was accompanied by severe loss of ezrin from glomerular and tubular epithelial cells after CI. Moreover, saline caused serious injury independently from its temperature, while the perfusion solution was more beneficial, especially at 4 degrees C. Conclusions: Flushing the kidney with ice-cold saline can cause more severe injury than ischemia-reperfusion at body temperature even during a short (30 min) ischemia. Saline perfusion can prolong recovery from ischemia in kidney transplantation, which can be prevented by using preservation solutions.
  • Anttonen, Tommi; Belevich, Ilya; Laos, Maarja; Herranen, Anni; Jokitalo, Eija; Brakebusch, Cord; Pirvola, Ulla (2017)
    Wound healing in the inner ear sensory epithelia is performed by the apical domains of supporting cells (SCs). Junctional F-actin belts of SCs are thin during development but become exceptionally thick during maturation. The functional significance of the thick belts is not fully understood. We have studied the role of F-actin belts during wound healing in the developing and adult cochlea of mice in vivo. We show that the thick belts serve as intracellular scaffolds that preserve the positions of surviving cells in the cochlear sensory epithelium. Junctions associated with the thick F-actin belts did not readily disassemble during wound healing. To compensate for this, basolateral membranes of SCs participated in the closure of surface breach. Because not only neighboring but also distant SCs contributed to wound healing by basolateral protrusions, this event appears to be triggered by contact-independent diffusible signals. In the search for regulators of wound healing, we inactivated RhoA in SCs, which, however, did not limit wound healing. RhoA inactivation in developing outer hair cells (OHCs) caused myosin II delocalization from the perijunctional domain and apical cell-surface enlargement. These abnormalities led to the extrusion of OHCs from the epithelium. These results demonstrate the importance of stability of the apical domain, both in wound repair by SCs and in development of OHCs, and that only this latter function is regulated by RhoA. Because the correct cytoarchitecture of the cochlear sensory epithelium is required for normal hearing, the stability of cell apices should be maintained in regenerative and protective interventions.
  • Heuser, Vanina D.; Mansuri, Naziha; Mogg, Jasper; Kurki, Samu; Repo, Heli; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Carpen, Olli; Gardberg, Maria (2018)
    Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options. The subgroup can be identified immunohistochemically, by lack of hormone receptor expression combined with expression of basal markers such as CK5/6 and/or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In vitro, several regulators of the actin cytoskeleton are essential for efficient invasion of basal-like breast cancer cell lines. Whether these proteins are expressed in vivo determines the applicability of these findings in clinical settings. The actin-regulating formin protein FHOD1 participates in invasion of the triple-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Here, we measure the expression of FHOD1 protein in clinical triple-negative breast cancers by using immunohistochemistry and further characterize the expression of another formin protein, INF2. We report that basal-like breast cancers frequently overexpress formin proteins FHOD1 and INF2. In cell studies using basal-like breast cancer cell lines, we show that knockdown of FHOD1 or INF2 interferes with very similar processes: maintenance of cell shape, migration, invasion, and proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR, PI3K, or mitogen-activated protein kinase activity does not alter the expression of FHOD1 and INF2 in these cell lines. We conclude that the experimental studies on these formins have implications in the clinical behavior of basal-like breast cancer.
  • Komulainen, Emilia; Zdrojewska, Justyna; Freemantle, Erika; Mohammad, Hasan; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Deshpande, Prasannakumar; Marchisella, Francesca; Mysore, Raghavendra; Hollos, Patrik; Michelsen, Kimmo A.; Magard, Mats; Rauvala, Heikki; James, Peter; Coffey, Eleanor T. (2014)
  • Jiu, Yaming; Kumari, Reena; Fenix, Aidan M.; Schaible, Niccole; Liu, Xiaonan; Varjosalo, Markku; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Burnette, Dylan T.; Lappalainen, Pekka (2019)
    Summary Cell adhesion, morphogenesis, mechanosensing, and muscle contraction rely on contractile actomyosin bundles, where the force is produced through sliding of bipolar myosin II filaments along actin filaments. The assembly of contractile actomyosin bundles involves registered alignment of myosin II filaments and their subsequent fusion into large stacks. However, mechanisms underlying the assembly of myosin II stacks and their physiological functions have remained elusive. Here, we identified myosin-18B, an unconventional myosin, as a stable component of contractile stress fibers. Myosin-18B co-localized with myosin II motor domains in stress fibers and was enriched at the ends of myosin II stacks. Importantly, myosin-18B deletion resulted in drastic defects in the concatenation and persistent association of myosin II filaments with each other and thus led to severely impaired assembly of myosin II stacks. Consequently, lack of myosin-18B resulted in defective maturation of actomyosin bundles from their precursors in osteosarcoma cells. Moreover, myosin-18B knockout cells displayed abnormal morphogenesis, migration, and ability to exert forces to the environment. These results reveal a critical role for myosin-18B in myosin II stack assembly and provide evidence that myosin II stacks are important for a variety of vital processes in cells.
  • Alkasalias, Twana; Alexeyenko, Andrey; Hennig, Katharina; Danielsson, Frida; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Fielden, Matthew; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Lehti, Kaisa; Kashuba, Vladimir; Madapura, Harsha S.; Bozoky, Benedek; Lundberg, Emma; Balland, Martial; Guven, Hayrettin; Klein, George; Gad, Annica K. B.; Pavlova, Tatiana (2017)
    Fibroblasts are a main player in the tumor-inhibitory microenvironment. Upon tumor initiation and progression, fibroblasts can lose their tumor-inhibitory capacity and promote tumor growth. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this switch have not been defined completely. Previously, we identified four proteins over-expressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts and linked to Rho GTPase signaling. Here, we show that knocking out the Ras homolog family member A (RhoA) gene in normal fibroblasts decreased their tumor-inhibitory capacity, as judged by neighbor suppression in vitro and accompanied by promotion of tumor growth in vivo. This also induced PC3 cancer cell motility and increased colony size in 2D cultures. RhoA knockout in fibroblasts induced vimentin intermediate filament reorganization, accompanied by reduced contractile force and increased stiffness of cells. There was also loss of wide F-actin stress fibers and large focal adhesions. In addition, we observed a significant loss of a-smooth muscle actin, which indicates a difference between RhoA knockout fibroblasts and classic cancer-associated fibroblasts. In 3D collagen matrix, RhoA knockout reduced fibroblast branching and meshwork formation and resulted in more compactly clustered tumor-cell colonies in coculture with PC3 cells, which might boost tumor stem-like properties. Coculturing RhoA knockout fibroblasts and PC3 cells induced expression of proinflammatory genes in both. Inflammatory mediators may induce tumor cell stemness. Network enrichment analysis of transcriptomic changes, however, revealed that the Rho signaling pathway per se was significantly triggered only after coculturing with tumor cells. Taken together, our findings in vivo and in vitro indicate that Rho signaling governs the inhibitory effects by fibroblasts on tumor-cell growth.
  • Wasik, Anita A.; Dash, Surjya N.; Lehtonen, Sanna (2019)
    Septins are a conserved family of GTP-binding proteins that assemble into cytoskeletal filaments to function in a highly sophisticated and physiologically regulated manner. Originally septins were discovered in the budding yeast as membrane-associated filaments that affect cell polarity and cytokinesis. In the last decades, much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical properties and cell biological functions of septins. In line with this, mammalian septins have been shown to be involved in various cellular processes, including regulation of cell polarity, cytoskeletal organization, vesicle trafficking, ciliogenesis, and cell-pathogen interactions. A growing number of studies have shown that septins play important roles in tissue and organ development and physiology; yet, little is known about their role in the kidney. In the following review, we discuss the structure and functions of septins in general and summarize the evidence for their presence and roles in the kidney.