Browsing by Subject "de Bruijn graph"

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  • Alanko, Jarno; Alipanahi, Bahar; Settle, Jonathen; Boucher, Christina; Gagie, Travis (2021)
    Motivation: The de Bruijn graph has become a ubiquitous graph model for biological data ever since its initial introduction in the late 1990s. It has been used for a variety of purposes including genome assembly (Zerbino and Birney, 2008; Bankevich et al., 2012; Peng et al., 2012), variant detection (Alipanahi et al., 2020b; Iqbal et al., 2012), and storage of assembled genomes (Chikhi et al., 2016). For this reason, there have been over a dozen methods for building and representing the de Bruijn graph and its variants in a space and time efficient manner. Results: With the exception of a few data structures (Muggli et al., 2019; Holley and Melsted, 2020; Crawford et al.,2018), compressed and compact de Bruijn graphs do not allow for the graph to be efficiently updated, meaning that data can be added or deleted. The most recent compressed dynamic de Bruijn graph (Alipanahi et al., 2020a), relies on dynamic bit vectors which are slow in theory and practice. To address this shortcoming, we present a compressed dynamic de Bruijn graph that removes the necessity of dynamic bit vectors by buffering data that should be added or removed from the graph. We implement our method, which we refer to as BufBOSS, and compare its performance to Bifrost, DynamicBOSS, and FDBG. Our experiments demonstrate that BufBOSS achieves attractive trade-offs compared to other tools in terms of time, memory and disk, and has the best deletion performance by an order of magnitude. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Research Network of Computational and Structural Biotechnology.
  • Mukherjee, Kingshuk; Rossi, Massimiliano; Salmela, Leena; Boucher, Christina (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Genome wide optical maps are high resolution restriction maps that give a unique numeric representation to a genome. They are produced by assembling hundreds of thousands of single molecule optical maps, which are called Rmaps. Unfortunately, there are very few choices for assembling Rmap data. There exists only one publicly-available non-proprietary method for assembly and one proprietary software that is available via an executable. Furthermore, the publicly-available method, by Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770–15775, 2006), follows the overlap-layout-consensus (OLC) paradigm, and therefore, is unable to scale for relatively large genomes. The algorithm behind the proprietary method, Bionano Genomics’ Solve, is largely unknown. In this paper, we extend the definition of bi-labels in the paired de Bruijn graph to the context of optical mapping data, and present the first de Bruijn graph based method for Rmap assembly. We implement our approach, which we refer to as rmapper, and compare its performance against the assembler of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770–15775, 2006) and Solve by Bionano Genomics on data from three genomes: E. coli, human, and climbing perch fish (Anabas Testudineus). Our method was able to successfully run on all three genomes. The method of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770–15775, 2006) only successfully ran on E. coli. Moreover, on the human genome rmapper was at least 130 times faster than Bionano Solve, used five times less memory and produced the highest genome fraction with zero mis-assemblies. Our software, rmapper is written in C++ and is publicly available under GNU General Public License at https://github.com/kingufl/Rmapper .
  • Mukherjee, Kingshuk; Rossi, Massimiliano; Salmela, Leena; Boucher, Christina (2021)
    Genome wide optical maps are high resolution restriction maps that give a unique numeric representation to a genome. They are produced by assembling hundreds of thousands of single molecule optical maps, which are called Rmaps. Unfortunately, there are very few choices for assembling Rmap data. There exists only one publicly-available non-proprietary method for assembly and one proprietary software that is available via an executable. Furthermore, the publicly-available method, by Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006), follows the overlap-layout-consensus (OLC) paradigm, and therefore, is unable to scale for relatively large genomes. The algorithm behind the proprietary method, Bionano Genomics' Solve, is largely unknown. In this paper, we extend the definition of bi-labels in the paired de Bruijn graph to the context of optical mapping data, and present the first de Bruijn graph based method for Rmap assembly. We implement our approach, which we refer to as rmapper, and compare its performance against the assembler of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) and Solve by Bionano Genomics on data from three genomes: E. coli, human, and climbing perch fish (Anabas Testudineus). Our method was able to successfully run on all three genomes. The method of Valouev et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103(43):15770-15775, 2006) only successfully ran on E. coli. Moreover, on the human genome rmapper was at least 130 times faster than Bionano Solve, used five times less memory and produced the highest genome fraction with zero mis-assemblies. Our software, rmapper is written in C++ and is publicly available under GNU General Public License at .