Browsing by Subject "desire"

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  • Airaksinen, Timo (2017)
    If you are able to satisfy your desires you are happy; this is one of the many theories of happiness. The Socratic Paradox says that a virtuous person is always happy, regardless of his circumstances. An enigmatic proposition follows: You can be happy even in the worst circumstances if you can satisfy your relevant desires. This sounds strange but I will argue that it is a plausible view. However, a lucky person, that is a person in good circumstances, may be unhappy. Let me suggest a Switch Test, namely, we ask whether an unhappy but lucky person would like to change places with a happy but unlucky person; the answer is in the negative. The lucky person will prefer his good circumstances regardless of the fact that he is and remains unhappy. Therefore, the happiness of Socrates is not what one should aim at. But to maintain that happiness is not desirable sounds paradoxical. The Socratic Paradox can be resolved but it then leads to another paradox of happiness.
  • Tolvanen, Pekka (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Understanding intending is crucial to the understanding of purposeful human action. In the philosophy of action beliefs and desires are usually taken to be the necessary conditions of intending. The disagreement over how intentions specifically are related to beliefs and desires, is often put in terms of whether intentions are independent mental states or not. Belief-desire accounts of intending don’t feature intentions as independent mental states, whereas belief-desire-intention accounts of intending do. The goal of most accounts of intentional action is to account for three senses of intentionality: intentional action, intention-with-which and intending. Intentional action and intention-with-which are usually taken to be explicable in terms of belief and desire. Thus the focus of this thesis is on intending. This thesis aims at providing a more comprehensible picture of the kinds of arguments that have been given for and against the reducibility of intentions. It also provides an overview to reductivist belief-desire accounts and nonreductivist belief-desire-intention accounts and a tentative classification of arguments against reduction. Finally a recent Humean reductivist belief-desire account of intending is explored more thoroughly.
  • Hietanen, Joel; Andéhn, Mikael; Wickstrom, Alice (2020)
    Adaptations of Deleuze's and Guattari's philosophizing on the immanent forces of the unconscious have risen to challenge joyous, affirmative readings of their work by bringing the dark and destructive aspects of desire into focus. We find an innate potentiality within such accounts, as they are themselves spoken by the inhuman within us - the forces which render our subjective intentions obsolete. To supplement more traditional forms of academic expression, we advocate for an affective style of writing that can bring about 'shocks to thought' and convey the inhumanity of desire. We see this as anactivating formof aesthetic violence that channels dark desiring itself and thereby challenges critical organizational scholarship that seeks to 'raise awareness'. An inhuman textuality that recognizes our own obscenity in disgust and through repulsion serves to unleash that which is typically unthinkable and unspeakable in organizational research.
  • Airaksinen, Timo (Brill, 2019)
    Vagaries of Desire is a major collection of new essays by Timo Airaksinen on the philosophy of desire. The first part develops a novel account of the philosophical theory of desire, including Girard. The second part discusses Kafka’s main works, namely The Castle, The Trial, and Amerika, and Thomas Hobbes and the problems of intentionality. The text develops such linguistic tropes as metaphor and metonymy in connection with topics like death and then applies them to Kafka’s texts. The third part makes an effort to understand the mysteries of sadism and masochism in philosophical and rhetorical terms. The last article criticizes Thomas Nagel’s influential account of sexual perversion and develops a viable alternative.
  • Airaksinen, Timo (Brill, 2019)
    Value Inquiry Book Series
    Names: Airaksinen, Timo, 1947- author. Title: Vagaries of desire : a collection of philosophical essays / Timo Airaksinen. Description: Leiden ; Boston : Brill-Rodopi, 2019. | Series: Value inquiry book series, 0929-8436 ; volume 340. Philosophy, literature, and politics | Includes index. | Summary: “Vagaries of Desire is a major collection of new essays by Timo Airaksinen on the philosophy of desire. The first part develops a novel account of the philosophical theory of desire, including Girard. The second part discusses Kafka’s main works, namely The Castle, The Trial, and Amerika, and Thomas Hobbes and the problems of intentionality. The text develops such linguistic tropes as metaphor and metonymy in connection with topics like death and then applies them to Kafka’s texts. The third part makes an effort to understand the mysteries of sadism and masochism in philosophical and rhetorical terms. The last article criticizes Thomas Nagel’s influential account of sexual perversion and develops a viable alternative”--
  • Wickstrom, Alice; Denny, Iain; Hietanen, Joel (2021)
    In this essay, we explore the limits of marketized belonging through Kristeva?s theorization of melancholia and desire. This allows us to problematize ?joyful? accounts of societal re-enchantment and how ?belonging? through collectives of consumption (such as neo-tribes, subcultures of consumption, and brand communities) is generally seen as a natural response to modernist rationalization and increased individualization. Instead, we argue that the scholarly understanding of collective forms of consumption has been premised upon paradoxical ground due to the notion of the subject-as-consumer as lacking often being implicitly reproduced, albeit theoretically neglected, allowing for the reproduction of romanticized ideals of marketized ?communality.? We foreground how tensions between individuality and communality are negotiated within markets and argue that collective forms of consumption feed upon separation, fragmentation, and the suspension of ?joy? rather than relationality and belonging. We propose that this allows for a better understanding of the desire to become through collective consumption and direct further attention toward questions related to liminality, detachment, loss, and exclusion.