Browsing by Subject "digital phenotyping"

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  • Asare, Kennedy Opoku; Terhorst, Yannik; Vega, Julio; Peltonen, Ella; Lagerspetz, Eemil; Ferreira, Denzil (2021)
    Background: Depression is a prevalent mental health challenge. Current depression assessment methods using self-reported and clinician-administered questionnaires have limitations. Instrumenting smartphones to passively and continuously collect moment-by-moment data sets to quantify human behaviors has the potential to augment current depression assessment methods for early diagnosis, scalable, and longitudinal monitoring of depression. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of predicting depression with human behaviors quantified from smartphone data sets, and to identify behaviors that can influence depression. Methods: Smartphone data sets and self-reported 8-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8) depression assessments were collected from 629 participants in an exploratory longitudinal study over an average of 22.1 days (SD 17.90; range 8-86). We quantified 22 regularity, entropy, and SD behavioral markers from the smartphone data. We explored the relationship between the behavioral features and depression using correlation and bivariate linear mixed models (LMMs). We leveraged 5 supervised machine learning (ML) algorithms with hyperparameter optimization, nested cross-validation, and imbalanced data handling to predict depression. Finally, with the permutation importance method, we identified influential behavioral markers in predicting depression. Results: Of the 629 participants from at least 56 countries, 69 (10.97%) were females, 546 (86.8%) were males, and 14 (2.2%) were nonbinary. Participants' age distribution is as follows: 73/629 (11.6%) were aged between 18 and 24, 204/629 (32.4%) were aged between 25 and 34, 156/629 (24.8%) were aged between 35 and 44, 166/629 (26.4%) were aged between 45 and 64, and 30/629 (4.8%) were aged 65 years and over. Of the 1374 PHQ-8 assessments, 1143 (83.19%) responses were nondepressed scores (PHQ-8 score = 10), as identified based on PHQ-8 cut-off. A significant positive Pearson correlation was found between screen status-normalized entropy and depression (r=0.14, P Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that behavioral markers indicative of depression can be unobtrusively identified from smartphone sensors' data. Traditional assessment of depression can be augmented with behavioral markers from smartphones for depression diagnosis and monitoring.
  • Moshe, Isaac; Terhorst, Yannik; Asare, Kennedy Opoku; Sander, Lasse Bosse; Ferreira, Denzil; Baumeister, Harald; Mohr, David C.; Pulkki-Råback, Laura (2021)
    Background: Depression and anxiety are leading causes of disability worldwide but often remain undetected and untreated. Smartphone and wearable devices may offer a unique source of data to detect moment by moment changes in risk factors associated with mental disorders that overcome many of the limitations of traditional screening methods. Objective: The current study aimed to explore the extent to which data from smartphone and wearable devices could predict symptoms of depression and anxiety. Methods: A total of N = 60 adults (ages 24-68) who owned an Apple iPhone and Oura Ring were recruited online over a 2-week period. At the beginning of the study, participants installed the Delphi data acquisition app on their smartphone. The app continuously monitored participants' location (using GPS) and smartphone usage behavior (total usage time and frequency of use). The Oura Ring provided measures related to activity (step count and metabolic equivalent for task), sleep (total sleep time, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset and time in bed) and heart rate variability (HRV). In addition, participants were prompted to report their daily mood (valence and arousal). Participants completed self-reported assessments of depression, anxiety and stress (DASS-21) at baseline, midpoint and the end of the study. Results: Multilevel models demonstrated a significant negative association between the variability of locations visited and symptoms of depression (beta = -0.21, p = 0.037) and significant positive associations between total sleep time and depression (beta = 0.24, p = 0.023), time in bed and depression (beta = 0.26, p = 0.020), wake after sleep onset and anxiety (beta = 0.23, p = 0.035) and HRV and anxiety (beta = 0.26, p = 0.035). A combined model of smartphone and wearable features and self-reported mood provided the strongest prediction of depression. Conclusion: The current findings demonstrate that wearable devices may provide valuable sources of data in predicting symptoms of depression and anxiety, most notably data related to common measures of sleep.