Browsing by Subject "distribution"

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  • Pieterse, Arnold; Rytkönen, Mari; Hellsten, Seppo (Finnish Environment Institute, 2009)
    Reports of the Finnish Environment Institute 15/2009
  • Kurtto, Arto Kalevi; Sennikov, Alexander Nikolaevich; Lampinen, Raino Ensio; Finnish Museum of Natural History (The Committee for Mapping the Flora of Europe & Societas Biologica Fennica Vanamo, 2018)
  • Näkki, Pinja; Setälä, Outi; Lehtiniemi, Maiju (2019)
    Marine Pollution Bulletin 119 (1): 255-261
    Microplastics (MPs) are observed to be present on the seafloor ranging from coastal areas to deep seas. Because bioturbation alters the distribution of natural particles on inhabited soft bottoms, a mesocosm experiment with common benthic invertebrates was conducted to study their effect on the distribution of secondary MPs (different-sized pieces of fishing line < 1 mm). During the study period of three weeks, the benthic community increased MP concentration in the depth of 1.7-5.1 cm in the sediment. The experiment revealed a clear vertical gradient in MP distribution with their abundance being highest in the uppermost parts of the sediment and decreasing with depth. The Baltic clam Macoma balthica was the only study animal that ingested MPs. This study highlights the need to further examine the vertical distribution of MPs in natural sediments to reliably assess their abundance on the seafloor as well as their potential impacts on benthic communities.
  • Laske, Sarah M.; Amundsen, Per‐Arne; Christoffersen, Kirsten S.; Erkinaro, Jaakko; Guðbergsson, Guðni; Hayden, Brian; Heino, Jani; Holmgren, Kerstin; Kahilainen, Kimmo K.; Lento, Jennifer; Orell, Panu; Östergren, Johan; Power, Michael; Rafikov, Ruslan; Romakkaniemi, Atso; Svenning, Martin-A.; Swanson, Heidi; Whitman, Matthew; Zimmerman, Christian E. (2019)
    Freshwater Biology 2022; 67: 176–193
    1. Climate change, biological invasions, and anthropogenic disturbance pose a threat to the biodiversity and function of Arctic freshwater ecosystems. Understanding potential changes in fish species distribution and richness is necessary, given the great importance of fish to the function of freshwater ecosystems and as a resource to humans. However, information gaps limit large-scale studies and our ability to determine patterns and trends in space and time. This study takes the first step in determining circumpolar patterns of fish species richness and composition, which provides a baseline to improve both monitoring and conservation of Arctic freshwater biodiversity. 2. Information on species presence/absence was gathered from the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program's Freshwater Database and used to examine patterns of freshwater fish γ-, α-, and β-diversity across 234° of longitude in the Arctic. The metrics of diversity provided information on species richness and composition across hydrobasins, ecoregions, and Arctic zones. 3. Circumpolar patterns of fish species biodiversity varied with latitude, isolation, and coarse ecoregion characteristics; patterns were consistent with historic and contemporary barriers to colonisation and environmental characteristics. Gamma-diversity was lower in the high Arctic compared to lower latitude zones, but α-diversity did not decrease with increasing latitude below 71°N, reflecting glacial history. Alpha-diversity was reduced to a single species, Arctic charr Salvelinus alpinus, in ecoregions above 71°N, where γ-diversity was the lowest. Beta-diversity indicated little variation in the composition and richness of species across the High Arctic; at lower latitudes, ecoregions contained more species, although species composition turned over across large spatial extents. 4. In an analysis of five ecoregions in the circumpolar Arctic, physical isolation, and ecoregion area and topography were identified as strong drivers of γ-, α-, and β-diversity. Physical isolation reduced the γ- and α-diversity, and changes in β-diversity between adjacent locations were due mainly to losses in species richness, rather than due to differences in species composition. Heterogeneity of habitats, environmental gradients, and geographic distance probably contributed to patterns of fish dissimilarity within and across ecoregions. 5. This study presents the first analysis of large-scale patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity in the circumpolar Arctic. However, information gaps in space, time, and among taxonomic groups remain. Future inclusion of extensive archive and new data will allow future studies to test for changes and drivers of the observed patterns of biodiversity. This is important given the potential impacts of ongoing and accelerating climate change, land use, and biotic exchange on Arctic fish biodiversity.
  • Hällfors, Maria H.; Pöyry, Juha; Heliölä, Janne; Kohonen, Ilmari; Kuussaari, Mikko; Leinonen, Reima; Schmucki, Reto; Sihvonen, Pasi; Saastamoinen, Marjo (Blackwell Science, 2021)
    Ecology Letters 24: 1619-1632
    Species can adapt to climate change by adjusting in situ or by dispersing to new areas, and these strategies may complement or enhance each other. Here, we investigate temporal shifts in phenology and spatial shifts in northern range boundaries for 289 Lepidoptera species by using long-term data sampled over two decades. While 40% of the species neither advanced phenology nor moved northward, nearly half (45%) used one of the two strategies. The strongest positive population trends were observed for the minority of species (15%) that both advanced flight phenology and shifted their northern range boundaries northward. We show that, for boreal Lepidoptera, a combination of phenology and range shifts is the most viable strategy under a changing climate. Effectively, this may divide species into winners and losers based on their propensity to capitalize on this combination, with potentially large consequences on future community composition.
  • Hällfors, Maria H.; Pöyry, Juha; Heliölä, Janne; Kohonen, Ilmari; Kuussaari, Mikko; Leinonen, Reima; Schmucki, Reto; Sihvonen, Pasi; Saastamoinen, Marjo (2021)
    Species can adapt to climate change by adjusting in situ or by dispersing to new areas, and these strategies may complement or enhance each other. Here, we investigate temporal shifts in phenology and spatial shifts in northern range boundaries for 289 Lepidoptera species by using long-term data sampled over two decades. While 40% of the species neither advanced phenology nor moved northward, nearly half (45%) used one of the two strategies. The strongest positive population trends were observed for the minority of species (15%) that both advanced flight phenology and shifted their northern range boundaries northward. We show that, for boreal Lepidoptera, a combination of phenology and range shifts is the most viable strategy under a changing climate. Effectively, this may divide species into winners and losers based on their propensity to capitalize on this combination, with potentially large consequences on future community composition.
  • Honkavaara, Juhana M.; Raekallio, Marja R.; Syrja, Pernilla M.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Knych, Heather K.; Kallio-Kujala, Ira J.; Vainio, Outi M. (2020)
    Objective To quantify the peripheral selectivity of vatinoxan (L-659,066, MK-467) in dogs by comparing the concentrations of vatinoxan, dexmedetomidine and levo-medetomidine in plasma and central nervous system (CNS) tissue after intravenous (IV) coadministration of vatinoxan and medetomidine. Study design Experimental, observational study. Animals A group of six healthy, purpose-bred Beagle dogs (four females and two males) aged 6.5 +/- 0.1 years (mean +/- standard deviation). Methods All dogs were administered a combination of medetomidine (40 mu g kg(-1)) and vatinoxan (800 mu g kg(-1)) as IV bolus. After 20 minutes, the dogs were euthanized with an IV overdose of pentobarbital (140 mg kg(-1)) and both venous plasma and CNS tissues (brain, cervical and lumbar spinal cord) were harvested. Concentrations of dexmedetomidine, levomedetomidine and vatinoxan in all samples were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and data were analyzed with nonparametric tests with post hoc corrections where appropriate. Results All dogs became deeply sedated after the treatment. The CNS-to-plasma ratio of vatinoxan concentration was approximately 1:50, whereas the concentrations of dexmedetomidine and levomedetomidine in the CNS were three- to seven-fold of those in plasma. Conclusions and clinical relevance With the doses studied, these results confirm the peripheral selectivity of vatinoxan in dogs, when coadministered IV with medetomidine. Thus, it is likely that vatinoxan preferentially antagonizes alpha(2)-adrenoceptors outside the CNS.
  • Laaksonen, Maija; Sajanti, Eeva; Sormunen, Jani J.; Penttinen, Ritva; Hanninen, Jari; Ruohomaki, Kai; Saaksjarvi, Ilari; Vesterinen, Eero J.; Vuorinen, Ilppo; Hytonen, Jukka; Klemola, Tero (2017)
    A national crowdsourcing-based tick collection campaign was organized in 2015 with the objective of producing novel data on tick distribution and tick-borne pathogens in Finland. Nearly 20 000 Ixodes ticks were collected. The collected material revealed the nationwide distribution of I. persulcatus for the first time and a shift northwards in the distribution of I. ricinus in Finland. A subset of 2038 tick samples containing both species was screened for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (the prevalence was 14.2% for I. ricinus and 19.8% for I. persulcatus), B. miyamotoi (0.2% and 0.4%, respectively) and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV; 0.2% and 3.0%, respectively). We also report new risk areas for TBEV in Finland and, for the first time, the presence of B. miyamotoi in ticks from mainland Finland. Most importantly, our study demonstrates the overwhelming power of citizen science in accomplishing a collection effort that would have been impossible with the scientific community alone.
  • Wood, Steffaney M.; Kremp, Anke; Savela, Henna; Akter, Sultana; Vartti, Vesa-Pekka; Saarni, Saija; Suikkanen, Sanna (Frontiers in Microbiology, 2021)
    Frontiers in Microbiology 12
    Cyanobacteria of the order Nostocales, including Baltic Sea bloom-forming taxa Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon flosaquae, and Dolichospermum spp., produce resting stages, known as akinetes, under unfavorable conditions. These akinetes can persist in the sediment and germinate if favorable conditions return, simultaneously representing past blooms and possibly contributing to future bloom formation. The present study characterized cyanobacterial akinete survival, germination, and potential cyanotoxin production in brackish water sediment archives from coastal and open Gulf of Finland in order to understand recent bloom expansion, akinete persistence, and cyanobacteria life cycles in the northern Baltic Sea. Results showed that cyanobacterial akinetes can persist in and germinate from Northern Baltic Sea sediment up to >40 and >400 years old, at coastal and open-sea locations, respectively. Akinete abundance and viability decreased with age and depth of vertical sediment layers. The detection of potential microcystin and nodularin production from akinetes was minimal and restricted to the surface sediment layers. Phylogenetic analysis of culturable cyanobacteria from the coastal sediment core indicated that most strains likely belonged to the benthic genus Anabaena. Potentially planktonic species of Dolichospermum could only be revived from the near-surface layers of the sediment, corresponding to an estimated age of 1–3 years. Results of germination experiments supported the notion that akinetes do not play an equally significant role in the life cycles of all bloom-forming cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea. Overall, there was minimal congruence between akinete abundance, cyanotoxin concentration, and the presence of cyanotoxin biosynthetic genes in either sediment core. Further research is recommended to accurately detect and quantify akinetes and cyanotoxin genes from brackish water sediment samples in order to further describe species-specific benthic archives of cyanobacteria.
  • Li, Zhengfei; Wang, Jun; Meng, Xingliang; Heino, Jani; Sun, Meiqin; Jiang, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhicai (2019)
    Freshwater Science 38 (1): 170-182
    Disentangling the effects of dispersal mode on the environmental and spatial processes structuring biological assemblages is essential to understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence and maintenance. Here, we use field investigations to link dispersal mode with environmental and spatial processes that control stream macroinvertebrate assemblage structure across the Yarlung Zangbo Grand Canyon of Tibet (Tibetan Plateau). We sampled macroinvertebrates in streams that occur in 4 distinct regions. Each of these regions has a steep elevational gradient but different altitude ranges, climate types, and water replenishment sources. We classified macroinvertebrate taxa into passive and active dispersal mode groups to test whether macroinvertebrates with different dispersal modes responded differently to environmental and spatial processes. Our results showed that the assemblage structure of active dispersal groups was more strongly determined by environmental variables (habitat filtering/species sorting) than spatial factors both within and across regions. In contrast, the structure of passive dispersers was more strongly associated with spatial factors than environmental filtering in the entire study area and within lower canyon regions. However, spatial effects were not important for either type of dispersal group in the upper canyon regions, especially in the region with glacier-fed streams, indicating the predominance of species sorting processes in these harsh environments. Furthermore, the spatial structuring of assemblages became stronger as habitat filtering declined, which indicates a reduction in species sorting processes in less harsh environments. Our findings demonstrate diverse responses of macroinvertebrate assemblages to environmental and spatial processes across this poorly-known highland river system, and imply that dispersal mode influences the underlying mechanisms of community variation.
  • Elo, Merja; Jyrkankallio-Mikkola, Jenny; Ovaskainen, Otso; Soininen, Janne; Tolonen, Kimmo T.; Heino, Jani (2021)
    The occupancy and abundance of species are jointly driven by local factors, such as environmental characteristics and biotic interactions, and regional-scale factors, such as dispersal and climate. Recently, it has been shown that biotic interactions shape species occupancies and abundances beyond local extents. However, for small ectothermic animals, particularly for those occurring in freshwater environments, the importance of biotic interactions remains understudied. Species-to-species associations from joint species distribution models (i.e. species associations while controlling for environmental characteristics) are increasingly used to draw hypotheses of which species possibly show biotic interactions. We studied whether species-to-species associations from joint species distribution models show signs of competition using a hypothesis testing framework in stream macroinvertebrate communities at regional extent. We sampled aquatic macroinvertebrates from 105 stream sites in western Finland encompassing a latitudinal gradient of c. 500 kilometres. We hypothesized that if competition drives these associations (H1) functionally, similar species are mostly negatively associated, whereas functionally dissimilar species show random associations. We further hypothesized that the relationship between functional dissimilarity and the strength of association is more pronounced (H2) for abundances rather than occupancies, (H3) at small grain (i.e. stream site) rather than at large grain (i.e. river basin), and (H4) among species having weak dispersal ability than among species with high dispersal ability. Stream macroinvertebrates showed both negative and positive species-to-species associations while controlling for habitat characteristics. However, the negative associations were mostly at large grain (river basin) rather than at small grain (stream site), in occupancy rather than abundance, and not related to species functional dissimilarity or to their dispersal ability. Thus, all our hypotheses considering possible competition (H1-H4) were rejected. Competition does not appear to be a major driving force of stream macroinvertebrate communities at the spatial grain sizes considered. The observed positive associations in occupancy at small grain (stream site) may be attributed to species' similar microhabitat preferences, whereas at large grain (river basin), they may stem from metacommunity dynamics. Our results highlight that species traits were necessary to interpret whether or not species-to-species associations from joint species distribution models resulted from biotic interactions.
  • Hill, Matthew J.; Heino, Jani; White, James C.; Ryves, David B.; Wood, Paul J. (2019)
    Biological Conservation 237: 348-357
    Understanding the spatial patterns and environmental drivers of freshwater diversity and community structure is a key challenge in biogeography and conservation biology. However, previous studies have focussed primarily on taxonomic diversity and have largely ignored the phylogenetic and functional facets resulting in an incomplete understanding of the community assembly. Here, we examine the influence of local environmental, hydrological proximity effects, land-use type and spatial structuring on taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic (using taxonomic relatedness as a proxy) alpha and beta diversity (including the turnover and nestedness-resultant components) of pond macroinvertebrate communities. Ninety-five ponds across urban and non-urban land-uses in Leicestershire, UK were examined. Functional and phylogenetic alpha diversity were negatively correlated with species richness. At the alpha scale, functional diversity and taxonomic richness were primarily determined by local environmental factors while phylogenetic alpha diversity was driven by spatial factors. Compositional variation (beta diversity) of the different facets and components of functional and phylogenetic diversity were largely determined by local environmental variables. Pond surface area, dry phase length and macrophyte cover were consistently important predictors of the different facets and components of alpha and beta diversity. Our results suggest that pond management activities aimed at improving biodiversity should focus on improving and/or restoring local environmental conditions. Quantifying alpha and beta diversity of the different biodiversity facets facilitates a more accurate assessment of patterns in diversity and community structure. Integrating taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity into conservation strategies will increase their efficiency and effectiveness, and maximise biodiversity protection in human-modified landscapes.
  • Von Raab-Straube, Eckhard; Raus, Thomas; Bazos, I.; Cornec, J. P.; De Belair, G.; Dimitrakopoulos, P. G.; El Mokni, R.; Fateryga, A. V.; Fateryga, V. V.; Fridlender, A.; Gil, J.; Grigorenko, V. N.; Hand, R.; Kovalchuk, A.; Mastrogianni, A.; Otto, R.; Raetzel, S.; Raus, Th.; Ristow, M.; Salas Pascual, M.; Strid, A.; Svirin, S. A.; Tsiripidis, I.; Uhlich, H.; Vela, E.; Verloove, F.; Vidakis, K.; Yena, A. V.; Yevseyenkov, P. E.; Zeddam, A. (2019)
    This is the eleventh of a series of miscellaneous contributions, by various authors, where hitherto unpublished data relevant to both the Med-Checklist and the Euro+Med (or Sisyphus) projects are presented. This instalment deals with the families Anacardiaceae, Asparagaceae (incl. Hyacinthaceae), Bignoniaceae, Cactaceae, Compositae, Cruciferae, Cyperaceae, Ericaceae, Gramineae, Labiatae, Leguminosae, Orobanchaceae, Polygonaceae, Rosaceae, Solanaceae and Staphyleaceae. It includes new country and area records and taxonomic and distributional considerations for taxa in Bidens, Campsis, Centaurea, Cyperus, Drymocallis, Engem, Hoffmannseggia, Hypopitys, Lavandula, Lithraea, Melilotus, Nicotiana, Olimarabidopsis, Opuntia, Orobanche, Phelipanche, Phragmites, Rumex, Salvia, Schinus, Staphylea, and a new combination in Drimia.
  • Raab-Straube, E. von; Raus, T.; Bazos, I.; Benítez-Benítez, C.; Bondareva, L.V.; Chiotelis, C.; Damianidis, C.; Ebel, A.L.; El Mokni, R.; Eleftheriadou, E.; Fateryga, V.; Jiménez-Mejías, P.; Martín-Bravo, S.; Míguez, M.; Rätzel, S.; Rätzel, B.; Ryff, L.; Ristow, M.; Sáez, L.; Samaras, D.A.; Sennikov, A.N.; Sequeira, M.; Strid, A.; Svirin, S.A.; Theodoropoulos, K.; Uhlich, H.; Zeddam, A. (2019)
    This is the tenth of a series of miscellaneous contributions, by various authors, where hitherto unpublished data relevant to both the Med-Checklist and the Euro+Med (or Sisyphus) projects are presentedThis instalment deals with the families Amaranthaceae, Campanulaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Compositae, Crassulaceae, Cruciferae, Cyperaceae, Ericaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Gramineae, Labiatae, Leguminosae, Moraceae, Nyctaginaceae, Orobanchaceae, Pittosporaceae, Solanaceae, Verbenaceae and VitaceaeIt includes new country and area records and taxonomic and distributional considerations for taxa in Acacia (Vachellia), Airopsis, Amaranthus, Bougainvillea, Bromus, Carex, Cerastium, Citharexylum, Clinopodium, Datura, Euphorbia, Ficus, Hieracium, Hypopitys, Kalanchoe, Lobelia, Parthenocissus, Phelipanche, Pittosporum, Polypogon, Rorippa, Spinacia and Symphyotrichum, and a new combination in Clinopodium. © 2019 The Authors.
  • Mammola, Stefano; Aharon, Shlomi; Seifan, Merav; Lubin, Yael; Gavish-Regev, Efrat (2019)
    Caves are excellent model systems to study the effects of abiotic factors on species distributions due to their selective conditions. Different ecological factors have been shown to affect species distribution depending on the scale of analysis, whether regional or local. The interplay between local and regional factors in explaining the spatial distribution of cave-dwelling organisms is poorly understood. Using the troglophilic subterranean spider Artema nephilit (Araneae: Pholcidae) as a model organism, we investigated whether similar environmental predictors drive the species distribution at these two spatial scales. At the local scale, we monitored the abundance of the spiders and measured relevant environmental features in 33 caves along the Jordan Rift Valley. We then extended the analysis to a regional scale, investigating the drivers of the distribution using species distribution models. We found that similar ecological factors determined the distribution at both local and regional scales for A. nephilit. At a local scale, the species was found to preferentially occupy the outermost, illuminated, and warmer sectors of caves. Similarly, mean annual temperature, annual temperature range, and solar radiation were the most important drivers of its regional distribution. By investigating these two spatial scales simultaneously, we showed that it was possible to achieve an in-depth understanding of the environmental conditions that governs subterranean species distribution.
  • Fourcade, Yoan; WallisDeVries, Michiel F.; Kuussaari, Mikko; Swaay, Chris A. M.; Heliölä, Janne; Öckinger, Erik (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2021)
    Ecology Letters 24: 5, 950-957
    Habitat fragmentation may present a major impediment to species range shifts caused by climate change, but how it affects local community dynamics in a changing climate has so far not been adequately investigated empirically. Using long-term monitoring data of butterfly assemblages, we tested the effects of the amount and distribution of semi-natural habitat (SNH), moderated by species traits, on climate-driven species turnover. We found that spatially dispersed SNH favoured the colonisation of warm-adapted and mobile species. In contrast, extinction risk of cold-adapted species increased in dispersed (as opposed to aggregated) habitats and when the amount of SNH was low. Strengthening habitat networks by maintaining or creating stepping-stone patches could thus allow warm-adapted species to expand their range, while increasing the area of natural habitat and its spatial cohesion may be important to aid the local persistence of species threatened by a warming climate.
  • Heino, Jani; Alahuhta, Janne; Fattorini, Simone (Wiley & Sons, 2019)
    Journal of Biogeography 2019; 46: 2548– 2557
    Aim Ecogeographical patterns have been widely studied in endothermic vertebrates, but relatively few studies have simultaneously examined patterns and causes of gradients in species richness, range size and body size in ectothermic insects. We examined patterns in species richness, mean range size and mean body size of ground beetle assemblages across the biogeographical provinces of Northern Europe, a region that was mostly covered by ice sheets during the latest Ice Age and that presents strong contemporary climatic gradients. Location Northern Europe. Methods We used literature information on the occurrence of ground beetles, and analysed patterns in species richness, mean range size and mean body size across the provinces using generalized linear models and boosted regression tree (BRT) analysis. Results We found a strongly decreasing gradient in species richness with increasing latitude, a strongly unimodal range size-latitude relationship, and a weak unimodal body size-latitude relationship in entire ground beetle assemblages. These gradients also varied among four major genera, suggesting that the overall patterns result from the nuances of smaller clades of ground beetles. The relative importance of contemporary environmental drivers also varied between species richness, mean range size and mean body size in BRT analysis. While species richness increased with mean annual temperature, mean range size showed an opposite relationship. Mean body size was most clearly associated with the precipitation of the driest month. Main Conclusions Our findings showed that the latitudinal species richness gradient was strong, and it was closely related to concomitant variation in temperature, whereas variations in mean range size and mean body size were more complex. These findings suggest that the causes for range size and body size variation in insects may be complex, requiring additional insights from studies conducted at local, regional and continental scales.
  • Menzel, Frank; Vilkamaa, Pekka (2021)
    The following species of the genus Lycoriella Frey sensu Vilkamaa & Menzel from the Holarctic region are newly described and illustrated: Lycoriella ampla sp. n. (Canada: Ontario), L. barkalovi sp. n. (Russia: Krasnoyarsk region), L. canningsi sp. n. (Canada: British Columbia), L. eurystylata sp. n. (Canada: Quebec), L. excavata sp. n. (USA: Colorado), L. jakovlevi sp. n. (Russia: Karelia), L. kinbasketi sp. n. (Canada: British Columbia), L. longa sp. n. (USA: Colorado), L. nivicola sp. n. (Canada: Nunavut, NWT; Greenland), L. pearyi sp. n. (Greenland), L. taimyrensis sp. n. (Russia: Krasnoyarsk region) and L. tundrae sp. n. (Russia: Krasnoyarsk region). Lycoriella parva (Holmgren, 1869) is redescribed and illustrated and new faunistic records are given for some previously described species of Lycoriella. The newly described species raise the number of known species of Lycoriella from 38 to 50.
  • Enroth, Johannes (2017)
    This paper presents new distributional records of five Chinese species of Neckera Hedw.: N. bhutanensis Nog. (new to Sichuan and Yunnan), N. borealis Nog. (new to Xinjiang), N. himalayana Mitt. (Yunnan, new to China), N. setschwanica Broth. (new to Bhutan), and N. xizangensis Enroth (new to Sichuan and Yunnan, the first reports of the species since type material from Xizang). Maps showing the distributions of the treated species in China and an updated key to the Chinese species of Neckera sensu lato are provided.