Browsing by Subject "dust, extinction"

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  • Feher, O.; Juvela, M.; Lunttila, T.; Montillaud, J.; Ristorcelli, I.; Zahorecz, S.; Toth, L. V. (2017)
    Context. The physical state of cold cloud clumps has a great impact on the process and efficiency of star formation and the masses of the forming stars inside these objects. The sub-millimetre survey of the Planck space observatory and the far-infrared follow-up mapping of the Herschel space telescope provide an unbiased, large sample of these cold objects. Aims. We have observed (CO)-C-12(1-0) and (CO)-C-13(1-0) emission in 35 high-density clumps in 26 Herschel fields sampling different environments in the Galaxy. Here, we aim to derive the physical properties of the objects and estimate their gravitational stability. Methods. The densities and temperatures of the clumps were calculated from both the dust continuum and the molecular line data. Kinematic distances were derived using (CO)-C-13(1-0) line velocities to verify previous distance estimates and the sizes and masses of the objects were calculated by fitting 2D Gaussian functions to their optical depth distribution maps on 250 mu m. The masses and virial masses were estimated assuming an upper and lower limit on the kinetic temperatures and considering uncertainties due to distance limitations. Results. The derived excitation temperatures are between 8.5-19.5 K, and for most clumps between 10 15 K, while the Herschel-derived dust colour temperatures are more uniform, between 12 16 K. The sizes (0.1-3 pc), (CO)-C-13 column densities (0.5-44 x 10(15) cm(-2)) and masses (from less than 0.1 M-circle dot to more than 1500 M-circle dot) of the objects all span broad ranges. We provide new kinematic distance estimates, identify gravitationally bound or unbound structures and discuss their nature. Conclusions. The sample contains objects on a wide scale of temperatures, densities and sizes. Eleven gravitationally unbound clumps were found, many of them smaller than 0.3 pc, but large, parsec-scale clouds with a few hundred solar masses appear as well. Colder clumps have generally high column densities but warmer objects appear at both low and higher column densities. The clump column densities derived from the line and dust observations correlate well, but are heavily affected by uncertainties of the dust properties, varying molecular abundances and optical depth effects.
  • Saajasto, M.; Juvela, M.; Dobashi, K.; Shimoikura, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Montillaud, J.; Marshall, D. J.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Feher, O.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Toth, L. V.; Montier, L.; Bernard, J. -Ph.; Onishi, T. (2017)
    Context. The combination of line and continuum observations can provide vital insight into the formation and fragmentation of filaments and the initial conditions for star formation. We have carried out line observations to map the kinematics of an evolved, actively star forming filament G82.65-2.00. The filament was first identified from the Planck data as a region of particularly cold dust emission and was mapped at 100-500 mu m as a part of the Herschel key program Galactic Cold Cores. The Herschel observations cover the central part of the filament, corresponding to a filament length of similar to 12 pc at the assumed distance of 620 pc.& para;& para;Aims. CO observations show that the filament has an intriguing velocity field with several velocity components around the filament. In this paper, we study the velocity structure in detail, to quantify possible mass accretion rate onto the filament, and study the masses of the cold cores located in the filament.& para;& para;Methods. We have carried out line observations of several molecules, including CO isotopologues, HCO+, HCN, and CS with the Osaka 1.85 m telescope and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The spectral line data are used to derive velocity and column density information.& para;& para;Results. The observations reveal several velocity components in the field, with strongest line emission concentrated to velocity range similar to[3,5] km s(-1). The column density of molecular hydrogen along the filament varies from 1.0 to 2.3 x 10(22) cm(2). We have examined six cold clumps from the central part of the filament. The clumps have masses in the range 10-20 M circle dot (similar to 70 M circle dot in total) and are close to or above the virial mass. Furthermore, the main filament is heavily fragmented and most of the substructures have a mass lower than or close to the virial mass, suggesting that the filament is dispersing as a whole. Position-velocity maps of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 lines indicate that at least one of the striations is kinematically connected to two of the clumps, potentially indicating mass accretion from the striation onto the main filament. We tentatively estimate the accretion rate to be M = 2.23 x 10(-6) M circle dot/yr.& para;& para;Conclusions. Our line observations have revealed two or possibly three velocity components connected to the filament G82.65-2.00 and putative signs of mass accretion onto the filament. The line observations combined with Herschel and WISE maps suggest a possible collision between two cloud components.
  • Chacon-Tanarro, A.; Pineda, J. E.; Caselli, P.; Bizzocchi, L.; Gutermuth, R. A.; Mason, B. S.; Gomez-Ruiz, A.; Harju, J.; Devlin, M.; Dicker, S. R.; Mroczkowski, T.; Romero, C. E.; Sievers, J.; Stanchfield, S.; Offner, S.; Sanchez-Argueelles, D. (2019)
    Context. The study of dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important to shed light on the dust properties and physical structure of pre-stellar cores, the initial conditions in the process of star and planet formation. Aims. Using two new continuum facilities, AzTEC at the Large Millimeter Telescope Alfonso Serrano and MUSTANG-2 at the Green Bank Observatory, we aim to detect changes in the optical properties of dust grains as a function of radius for the well-known pre-stellar core L1544. Methods. We determined the emission profiles at 1.1 and 3.3 mm and examine whether they can be reproduced in terms of the current best physical models for L1544. We also made use of various tools to determine the radial distributions of the density, temperature, and dust opacity in a self-consistent manner. Results. We find that our observations cannot be reproduced without invoking opacity variations. New temperature and density profiles, as well as opacity variations across the core, have been derived with the new data. The opacity changes are consistent with the expected variations between uncoagulated bare grains, toward the outer regions of the core, and grains with thick ice mantles, toward the core center. A simple analytical grain growth model predicts the presence of grains of similar to 3-4 mu m within the central 2000 au for the new density profile.
  • Juvela, Mika; Guillet, Vincent; Liu, Tie; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Alina, Dana; Bronfman, Leonardo; Eden, David J.; Kim, Kee Tae; Koch, Patrick M.; Kwon, Woojin; Lee, Chang Won; Malinen, Johanna; Micelotta, Elisabetta; Montillaud, Julien; Rawlings, Mark G.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Soam, Archana; Traficante, Alessio; Ysard, Nathalie; Zhang, Chuan-Peng (2018)
    Context. The sub-millimetre polarisation of dust emission from star-forming clouds carries information on grain properties and on the effects that magnetic fields have on cloud evolution. Aims. Using observations of a dense filamentary cloud G035.39-00.33, we aim to characterise the dust emission properties and the variations of the polarisation fraction. Methods. JCMT SCUBA-2/POL-2 observations at 850 mu m were combined with Planck 850 mu m (353 GHz) data to map polarisation fraction at small and large scales. With previous total intensity SCUBA-2 observations (450 and 850 mu m) and Herschel data, the column densities were determined via modified black-body fits and via radiative transfer modelling. Models were constructed to examine how the observed polarisation angles and fractions depend on potential magnetic field geometries and grain alignment processes. Results. POL-2 data show clear changes in the magnetic field orientation. These are not in contradiction with the uniform orientation and almost constant polarisation fraction seen by Planck, because of the difference in the beam sizes and the POL-2 data being affected by spatial filtering. The filament has a peak column density of N(H-2) similar to 7 x 10(22) cm(-2), a minimum dust temperature of T similar to 12 K, and a mass of similar to 4300 M-circle dot for the area N(H-2) > 5 x 10(21) cm(-2). The estimated average value of the dust opacity spectral index is beta similar to 1.9. The ratio of sub-millimetre and J-band optical depths is tau (250 mu m)/tau(J) similar to 2.5 x 10(-3), more than four times the typical values for diffuse medium. The polarisation fraction decreases as a function of column density to p similar to 1% in the central filament. Because of noise, the observed decrease of p(N) is significant only at N(H-2) > 2 x 10(22) cm(-2). The observations suggest that the grain alignment is not constant. Although the data can be explained with a complete loss of alignment at densities above similar to 10(4) cm(-3) or using the predictions of radiative torques alignment, the uncertainty of the field geometry and the spatial filtering of the SCUBA-2 data prevent strong conclusions. Conclusions. The G035.39-00.33 filament shows strong signs of dust evolution and the low polarisation fraction is suggestive of a loss of polarised emission from its densest parts.
  • Mattila, K.; Väisänen, P.; Lehtinen, K.; von Appen-Schnur, G.; Leinert, Ch. (2017)
    In a project aimed at measuring the optical extragalactic background light (EBL), we are using the shadow of a dark cloud. We have performed, with the ESO VLT/FORS, spectrophotometry of the surface brightness towards the high-galactic-latitude dark cloud Lynds 1642. A spectrum representing the difference between the opaque core of the cloud and several unobscured positions around the cloud was presented in Paper I. The topic of this paper is the separation of the scattered starlight from the dark cloud itself which is the only remaining foreground component in this difference. While the scattered starlight spectrum has the characteristic Fraunhofer lines and the discontinuity at 400 nm, typical of integrated light of galaxies, the EBL spectrum is a smooth one without these features. As template for the scattered starlight, we make use of the spectra at two semitransparent positions. The resulting EBL intensity at 400 nm is I-EBL = 2.9 +/- 1.1 10(-9) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) angstrom(-1) or 11.6 +/- 4.4 nW m(-2) sr(-1), which represents a 2.6 sigma detection; the scaling uncertainty is +20 per cent/-16 per cent. At 520 nm, we have set a 2 sigma upper limit of I-EBL
  • Mattila, K.; Lehtinen, K.; Väisänen, P.; von Appen-Schnur, G.; Leinert, Ch. (2017)
    We present the method and observations for the measurement of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) utilizing the shadowing effect of a dark cloud. We measure the surface brightness difference between the opaque cloud core and its unobscured surroundings. In the difference the large atmospheric and Zodiacal light components are eliminated and the only remaining foreground component is the scattered starlight from the cloud itself. Although much smaller, its separation is the key problem in the method. For its separation we use spectroscopy. While the scattered starlight has the characteristic Fraunhofer lines and 400 nm discontinuity, the EBL spectrum is smooth and without these features. Medium resolution spectrophotometry at lambda = 380-580 nm was performed with VLT/FORS at ESO of the surface brightness in and around the high-galactic-latitude dark cloud Lynds 1642. Besides the spectrum for the core with AV greater than or similar to 15 mag, further spectra were obtained for intermediate-opacity cloud positions. They are used as proxy for the spectrum of the impinging starlight spectrum and to facilitate the separation of the scattered starlight (cf. Paper II; Mattila et al.). Our spectra reach a precision of less than or similar to 0.5 x 10(-9) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) angstrom(-1) as required to measure an EBL intensity in range of similar to 1 to a few times 10(-9) erg cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) angstrom(-1). Because all surface brightness components are measured using the same equipment, the method does not require unusually high absolute calibration accuracy, a condition that has been a problem for some previous EBL projects.
  • Juvela, M.; Malinen, J.; Montillaud, J.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Tóth, L. V. (2018)
    Context. The Galactic Cold Cores (GCC) project has made Herschel photometric observations of interstellar clouds where Planck detected compact sources of cold dust emission. The fields are in different environments and stages of star formation. Aims. Our aim is to characterise the structure of the clumps and their parent clouds, and to study the connections between the environment and the formation of gravitationally bound objects. We also examine the accuracy to which the structure of dense clumps can be determined from sub-millimetre data. Methods. We use standard statistical methods to characterise the GCC fields. Individual clumps are extracted using column density thresholding. Based on sub-millimetre measurements, we construct a three-dimensional radiative transfer (RT) model for each field. These are used to estimate the relative radiation field intensities, to probe the clump stability, and to examine the uncertainty of column density estimates. We examine the structural parameters of the clumps, including their radial column density profiles. Results. In the GCC fields, the structure noise follows the relations previously established at larger scales and in lower-density clouds. The fractal dimension has no significant dependence on column density and the values D-p = 1.25 +/- 0.07 are only slightly lower than in typical molecular clouds. The column density probability density functions (PDFs) exhibit large variations, for example, in the case of externally compressed clouds. At scales r > 0.1 pc, the radial column density distributions of the clouds follow an average relation of N similar to r(-1). In spite of a great variety of clump morphologies (and a typical aspect ratio of 1.5), clumps tend to follow a similar N similar to r(-1) relation below r similar to 0.1 pc. RT calculations indicate only factor 2.5 variation in the local radiation field intensity. The fraction of gravitationally bound clumps increases significantly in regions with A v > 5 mag but most bound objects appear to be pressure-confined. Conclusions. The host clouds of the cold clumps in the GCC sample have statistical properties similar to general molecular clouds. The gravitational stability, peak column density, and clump orientation are connected to the cloud background while most other statistical clump properties (e.g. D-p and radial profiles) are insensitive to the environment. The study of clump morphology should be continued with a comparison with numerical simulations.
  • Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.; Men'shchikov, A.; Malinen, J.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Marston, A.; Martin, P. G.; Pagani, L.; Paladini, R.; Paradis, D.; Ysard, N.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bernard, J. -P.; Marshall, D. J.; Montier, L.; Toth, L. V. (2017)
    Context. The onset of star formation is intimately linked with the presence of massive unstable filamentary structures. These filaments are therefore key for theoretical models that aim to reproduce the observed characteristics of the star formation process in the Galaxy. Aims. As part of the filament study carried out by the Herschel Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme, here we study and discuss the filament properties presented in GCC VII (Paper I) in context with theoretical models of filament formation and evolution. Methods. A conservatively selected sample of filaments located at a distance D <500 pc was extracted from the GCC fields with the getfilaments algorithm. The physical structure of the filaments was quantified according to two main components: the central (Gaussian) region of the filament (core component), and the power-law-like region dominating the filament column density profile at larger radii (wing component). The properties and behaviour of these components relative to the total linear mass density of the filament and the column density of its environment were compared with the predictions from theoretical models describing the evolution of filaments under gravity-dominated conditions. Results. The feasibility of a transition from a subcritical to supercritical state by accretion at any given time is dependent on the combined effect of filament intrinsic properties and environmental conditions. Reasonably self-gravitating (high M-line,M-core) filaments in dense environments (Av greater than or similar to 3 mag) can become supercritical on timescales of t similar to 1 Myr by accreting mass at constant or decreasing width. The trend of increasing M-line,M-tot (M-line,M-core and M-line,M-wing) and ridge A(v) with background for the filament population also indicates that the precursors of star-forming filaments evolve coevally with their environment. The simultaneous increase of environment and filament Av explains the observed association between dense environments and high Mlille,co values, and it argues against filaments remaining in constant single-pressure equilibrium states. The simultaneous growth of filament and background in locations with efficient mass assembly, predicted in numerical models of filaments in collapsing clouds, presents a suitable scenario for the fulfillment of the combined filament mass-environment criterium that is in quantitative agreement with Herschel observations.
  • Juvela, Mika; He, Jinhua; Pattle, Katherine; Liu, Tie; Bendo, George; Eden, David J.; Feher, Orsolya; Fich, Michel; Fuller, Gary; Hirano, Naomi; Kim, Kee-Tae; Li, Di; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Malinen, Johanna; Marshall, Douglas J.; Paradis, Deborah; Parsons, Harriet; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Rawlings, Mark G.; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Samal, Manash R.; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Thompson, Mark; Traficante, Alessio; Wang, Ke; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Wu, Yuefang; Yi, Hee-Weon; Yoo, Hyunju (2018)
    Context. Analysis of all-sky Planck submillimetre observations and the IRAS 100 mu m data has led to the detection of a population of Galactic cold clumps. The clumps can be used to study star formation and dust properties in a wide range of Galactic environments. Aims. Our aim is to measure dust spectral energy distribution ( SED) variations as a function of the spatial scale and the wavelength. Methods. We examined the SEDs at large scales using IRAS, Planck, and Herschel data. At smaller scales, we compared JCMT/SCUBA-2 850 mu m maps with Herschel data that were filtered using the SCUBA-2 pipeline. Clumps were extracted using the Fellwalker method, and their spectra were modelled as modified blackbody functions. Results. According to IRAS and Planck data, most fields have dust colour temperatures T-C similar to 14-18K and opacity spectral index values of beta = 1.5-1.9. The clumps and cores identified in SCUBA-2 maps have T similar to 13K and similar beta values. There are some indications of the dust emission spectrum becoming flatter at wavelengths longer than 500 mu m. In fits involving Planck data, the significance is limited by the uncertainty of the corrections for CO line contamination. The fits to the SPIRE data give a median beta value that is slightly above 1.8. In the joint SPIRE and SCUBA-2 850 mu m fits, the value decreases to beta similar to 1.6. Most of the observed T-beta anticorrelation can be explained by noise. Conclusions. The typical submillimetre opacity spectral index fi of cold clumps is found to be similar to 1.7. This is above the values of diffuse clouds, but lower than in some previous studies of dense clumps. There is only tentative evidence of a T-beta anticorrelation and beta decreasing at millimetre wavelengths.
  • Montillaud, Julien; Juvela, Mika; Vastel, Charlotte; He, JinHua; Liu, Tie; Ristorcelli, Isabelle; Eden, David; Kang, Sung-ju; Kim, Kee-Tae; Koch, Patrick M.; Lee, Chang Won; Rawlings, Mark G.; Saajasto, Mika; Sanhueza, Patricio; Soam, Archana; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Alina, Dana; Bogner, Rebeka; Cornu, David; Doi, Yasuo; Malinen, Johanna; Marshall, Douglas J.; Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Tóth, L. Viktor; Traficante, Alessio; Wang, Ke (2019)
    Context. Current theories and models attempt to explain star formation globally, from core scales to giant molecular cloud scales. A multi-scale observational characterisation of an entire molecular complex is necessary to constrain them. We investigate star formation in G202.3+2.5, a ̃10 × 3 pc sub-region of the Monoceros OB1 cloud with a complex morphology that harbours interconnected filamentary structures. Aims: We aim to connect the evolution of cores and filaments in G202.3+2.5 with the global evolution of the cloud and to identify the engines of the cloud dynamics. Methods: In this first paper, the star formation activity is evaluated by surveying the distributions of dense cores and protostars and their evolutionary state, as characterised using both infrared observations from the Herschel and WISE telescopes and molecular line observations with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We find ongoing star formation in the whole cloud, with a local peak in star formation activity around the centre of G202.3+2.5, where a chain of massive cores (10 - 50 M☉) forms a massive ridge (≳150 M☉). All evolutionary stages from starless cores to Class II protostars are found in G202.3+2.5, including a possibly starless and massive (52 M☉) core, which presents a high column density (8 × 1022 cm-2). Conclusions: All the core-scale observables we examined point to an enhanced star formation activity that is centred on the junction between the three main branches of the ramified structure of G202.3+2.5. This suggests that the increased star formation activity results from the convergence of these branches. To further investigate the origin of this enhancement, it is now necessary to extend the analysis to larger scales in order to examine the relationship between cores, filaments, and their environment. We address these points through the analysis of the dynamics of G202.3+2.5 in a joint paper.
  • Mattila, K.; Haas, M.; Haikala, L. K.; Jo, Y-S.; Lehtinen, K.; Leinert, Ch.; Väisänen, P. (2018)
    Context. Dark nebulae display a surface brightness because dust grains scatter light of the general interstellar radiation field (ISRF). High-galactic-latitudes dark nebulae are seen as bright nebulae when surrounded by transparent areas which have less scattered light from the general galactic dust layer. Aims. Photometry of the bright dark nebulae LDN 1780, LDN 1642, and LBN 406 shall be used to derive scattering properties of dust and to investigate the presence of UV fluorescence emission by molecular hydrogen and the extended red emission (ERE). Methods. We used multi-wavelength optical photometry and imaging at ground-based telescopes and archival imaging and spectroscopic UV data from the spaceborn GALEX and SPEAR/FIMS instruments. In the analysis we used Monte Carlo RT and both observational data and synthetic models for the ISRF in the solar neighbourhood. The line-of-sight extinctions through the clouds have been determined using near infrared excesses of background stars and the 200/250 mu m far infrared emission by dust as measured using the ISO and Herschel space observatories. Results. The optical surface brightness of the three target clouds can be explained in terms of scattered light. The dust albedo ranges from similar to 0.58 at 3500 angstrom to similar to 0.72 at 7500 angstrom. The spectral energy distribution of LDN 1780 is explained in terms of optical depth and background scattered light effects instead of the original published suggestion in terms of ERE. The far-ultraviolet surface brightness of LDN 1780 cannot be explained by scattered light only. In LDN 1780, H-2 fluorescent emission in the wavelength range 1400-1700 angstrom has been detected and analysed. Conclusions. Our albedo values are in good agreement with the predictions of the dust model of Weingartner and Draine and with the THEMIS CMM model for evolved core-mantle grains. The distribution of H-2 fluorescent emission in LDN 1780 shows a pronounced dichotomy with a strong preference for its southern side where enhanced illumination is impinging from the Sco OB2 association and the O star zeta Oph. A good correlation is found between the H-2 fluorescence and a previously mapped 21-cm excess emission. The H-2 fluorescence emission in LDN 1780 has been modelled using a PDR code; the resulting values for H-2 column density and the total gas density are consistent with the estimates derived from CO observations and optical extinction along the line of sight.
  • Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L. -Y; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, Elina; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tuovinen, J.; Valiviita, J.; Ysard, N. (2014)
  • Abergel, A.; Juvela, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, Anne; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J.; Planck Collaboration (2014)
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J.; Planck Collaboration; Fermi LAT Collaboration (2015)
    The nearby Chamaeleon clouds have been observed in gamma rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and in thermal dust emission by Planck and IRAS. Cosmic rays and large dust grains, if smoothly mixed with gas, can jointly serve with the Hi and (CO)-C-12 radio data to (i) map the hydrogen column densities, N-H, in the different gas phases, in particular at the dark neutral medium (DNM) transition between the H I-bright and CO-bright media; (ii) constrain the CO-to-H-2 conversion factor, X-CO; and (iii) probe the dust properties per gas nucleon in each phase and map their spatial variations across the clouds. We have separated clouds at local, intermediate, and Galactic velocities in H i and (1)2CO line emission to model in parallel the gamma-ray intensity recorded between 0.4 and 100 GeV; the dust optical depth at 353 GHz, tau(353); the thermal radiance of the large grains; and an estimate of the dust extinction, A(VQ), empirically corrected for the starlight intensity. The dust and gamma-models have been coupled to account for the DNM gas. The consistent gamma-emissivity spectra recorded in the different phases confirm that the GeV-TeV cosmic rays probed by the LAT uniformly permeate all gas phases up to the (CO)-C-12 cores. The dust and cosmic rays both reveal large amounts of DNM gas, with comparable spatial distributions and twice as much mass as in the CO-bright clouds. We give constraints on the H I-DNM-CO transitions for five separate clouds. CO-dark H-2 dominates the molecular columns up to A(V) similar or equal to 0.9 and its mass often exceeds the one-third of the molecular mass expected by theory. The corrected A(VQ) extinction largely provides the best fit to the total gas traced by the gamma rays. Nevertheless, we find evidence for a marked rise in A(VQ)/N-H with increasing N-H and molecular fraction, and with decreasing dust temperature. The rise in tau(353)/N-H is even steeper. We observe variations of lesser amplitude and orderliness for the specific power of the grains, except for a coherent decline by half in the CO cores. This combined information suggests grain evolution. We provide average values for the dust properties per gas nucleon in the different phases. The gamma rays and dust radiance yield consistent X-CO estimates near 0.7 x 10(20) cm(-2) K-1 km(-1) s. The A(VQ) and tau(353) tracers yield biased values because of the large rise in grain opacity in the CO clouds. These results clarify a recurrent disparity in the gamma-versus dust calibration of X-CO, but they confirm the factor of 2 difference found between the X-CO estimates in nearby clouds and in the neighbouring spiral arms.
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alina, D.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Amaue, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banda, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, E.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, Elina; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J. (2015)
    This paper presents an overview of the polarized sky as seen by Planck HFI at 353GHz, which is the most sensitive Planck channel for dust polarization. We construct and analyse maps of dust polarization fraction and polarization angle at 1 degrees resolution, taking into account noise bias and possible systematic effects. The sensitivity of the Planck HFI polarization measurements allows for the first time a mapping of Galactic dust polarized emission on large scales, including low column density regions. We find that the maximum observed dust polarization fraction is high (p(max) = 19.8%), in particular in some regions of moderate hydrogen column density (N-H <2 x 10(21) cm(-2)). The polarization fraction displays a large scatter at NH below a few 10(21) cm(-2). There is a general decrease in the dust polarization fraction with increasing column density above N-H similar or equal to 1 x 10(21) cm(-2) and in particular a sharp drop above N-H similar or equal to 1.5 x 10(22) cm(-2). We characterize the spatial structure of the polarization angle using the angle dispersion function. We find that the polarization angle is ordered over extended areas of several square degrees, separated by filamentary structures of high angle dispersion function. These appear as interfaces where the sky projection of the magnetic field changes abruptly without variations in the column density. The polarization fraction is found to be anti-correlated with the dispersion of polarization angles. These results suggest that, at the resolution of 1 degrees, depolarization is due mainly to fluctuations in the magnetic field orientation along the line of sight, rather than to the loss of grain alignment in shielded regions. We also compare the polarization of thermal dust emission with that of synchrotron measured with Planck, low-frequency radio data, and Faraday rotation measurements toward extragalactic sources. These components bear resemblance along the Galactic plane and in some regions such as the Fan and North Polar Spur regions. The poor match observed in other regions shows, however, that dust, cosmic-ray electrons, and thermal electrons generally sample different parts of the line of sight.
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alina, D.; Alves, M. I. R.; Aniano, G.; Annitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Arzoumanian, D.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. E.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J. (2015)
    Polarized emission observed by Planck HFI at 353GHz towards a sample of nearby fields is presented, focusing on the statistics of polarization fractions p and angles psi. The polarization fractions and column densities in these nearby fields are representative of the range of values obtained over the whole sky. We find that: (i) the largest polarization fractions are reached in the most diffuse fields; (ii) the maximum polarization fraction p(max) decreases with column density N-H in the more opaque fields with N-H > 10(21) cm(-2); and (iii) the polarization fraction along a given line of sight is correlated with the local spatial coherence of the polarization angle. These observations are compared to polarized emission maps computed in simulations of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamical turbulence in which we assume a uniform intrinsic polarization fraction of the dust grains. We find that an estimate of this parameter may be recovered from the maximum polarization fraction p(max) in diffuse regions where the magnetic field is ordered on large scales and perpendicular to the line of sight. This emphasizes the impact of anisotropies of the magnetic field on the emerging polarization signal. The decrease of the maximum polarization fraction with column density in nearby molecular clouds is well reproduced in the simulations, indicating that it is essentially due to the turbulent structure of the magnetic field: an accumulation of variously polarized structures along the line of sight leads to such an anti-correlation. In the simulations, polarization fractions are also found to anti-correlate with the angle dispersion function S. However, the dispersion of the polarization angle for a given polarization fraction is found to be larger in the simulations than in the observations, suggesting a shortcoming in the physical content of these numerical models. In summary, we find that the turbulent structure of the magnetic field is able to reproduce the main statistical properties of the dust polarization as observed in a variety of nearby clouds, dense cores excluded, and that the large-scale field orientation with respect to the line of sight plays a major role in the quantitative analysis of these statistical properties.
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alina, D.; Aniano, G.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Beichman, C.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fanciullo, L.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Magalhaes, A. M.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschenes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piot, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Poidevin, F.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zonca, A. (2015)
    The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust. In addition to the information on the direction of the Galactic magnetic field, this also brings new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiation seen by Planck in the submillimetre also extinguish and polarize starlight in the visible. Comparison of the polarization of the emission and of the interstellar polarization on selected lines of sight probed by stars provides unique new diagnostics of the emission and light scattering properties of dust, and therefore of the important dust model parameters, composition, size, and shape. Using ancillary catalogues of interstellar polarization and extinction of starlight, we obtain the degree of polarization, p(V), and the optical depth in the V band to the star, tau(V). Toward these stars we measure the submillimetre polarized intensity, P-S, and total intensity, I-S,I- in the Planck 353 GHz channel. We compare the column density measure in the visible, E(B - V), with that inferred from the Planck product map of the submillimetre dust optical depth and compare the polarization direction (position angle) in the visible with that in the submillimetre. For those lines of sight through the di ff use interstellar medium with comparable values of the estimated column density and polarization directions close to orthogonal, we correlate properties in the submillimetre and visible to find two ratios, R-S/V = (P-S/I-S) = (p(V)/tau(V)) and R-P/p = P-S/p(V), the latter focusing directly on the polarization properties of the aligned grain population alone. We find R-S/V = 4.2, with statistical and systematic uncertainties 0.2 and 0.3, respectively, and R-P/p = 5.4 MJy sr(-1), with uncertainties 0.2 and 0.3 MJy sr(-1), respectively. Our estimate of R-S/V is compatible with predictions based on a range of polarizing dust models that have been developed for the di ff use interstellar medium. This estimate provides new empirical validation of many of the common underlying assumptions of the models, but is not yet very discriminating among them. However, our estimate of R-P/p is not compatible with predictions, which are too low by a factor of about 2.5. This more discriminating diagnostic, R-P/p, indicates that changes to the optical properties in the models of the aligned grain population are required. These new diagnostics, together with the spectral dependence in the submillimetre from Planck, will be important for constraining and understanding the full complexity of the grain models, and for interpreting the Planck thermal dust polarization and refinement of the separation of this contamination of the cosmic microwave background.
  • Herranen, Joonas; Lazarian, A.; Hoang, Thiem (2019)
    The radiative torque (RAT) mechanism is the most promising way of explaining observed polarization arising from aligned grains. We explore the efficiency of the grain alignment by an anisotropic radiation flow for an extensive ensemble of grain shapes, grain sizes (a), and wavelength (lambda). We calculate the distribution of the ratios of the amplitudes of the two major components of the RATs, which is an essential parameter that is used in the theory of RAT alignment in Lazarian & Hoang. While this distribution is different for the different classes of grain shapes that we considered, the most probable values of the parameter are centered in the range of q(max) similar to 0.5-1.5. The functional form from the calculated RATs is in good agreement with the analytical model. We find that the RAT efficiency scales as (lambda/a)(-2.6) for lambda greater than or similar to 1.8a, which has a slightly shallower slope than previously found in LH07. This increases the power of predictions obtained with the RAT theory. We also confirm that superparamagnetic inclusions are necessary for achieving high degrees of alignment, and constrain the parameter space describing the requirements for achieving these alignment degrees.
  • Paradis, D.; Meny, C.; Juvela, M.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Ristorcelli, I. (2019)
    Context. Some Galactic molecular clouds show signs of dust evolution as compared to the diffuse interstellar medium, most of the time through indirect evidence such as color ratios, increased dust emissivity, or scattering (coreshine). These signs are not a feature of all Galactic clouds. Moreover, molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been analyzed in a previous study based on Spitzer and IRIS data, at 4' angular resolution, with the use of one single dust model, and did not show any signs of dust evolution. Aims. In this present analysis we investigate the dust properties associated with the different gas phases (including the ionized phase this time) of the LMC molecular clouds at 1' angular resolution (four times greater than the previous analysis) and with a larger spectral coverage range thanks to Herschel data. We also ensure the robustness of our results in the framework of various dust models. Methods. We performed a decomposition of the dust emission in the infrared (from 3.6 to 500 mu m) associated with the atomic, molecular, and ionized gas phases in the molecular clouds of the LMC. The resulting spectral energy distributions were fitted with four distinct dust models. We then analyzed the model parameters such as the intensity of the radiation field and the relative dust abundances, as well as the slope of the emission spectra at long wavelengths. Results. This work allows dust models to be compared with infrared data in various environments for the first time, which reveals important differences between the models at short wavelengths in terms of data fitting (mainly in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands). In addition, this analysis points out distinct results according to the gas phases, such as dust composition directly affecting the dust temperature and the dust emissivity in the submillimeter and different dust emission in the near-infrared (NIR). Conclusions. We observe direct evidence of dust property evolution from the diffuse to the dense medium in a large sample of molecular clouds in the LMC. In addition, the differences in the dust component abundances between the gas phases could indicate different origins of grain formation. We also point out the presence of a NIR-continuum in all gas phases, with an enhancement in the ionized gas. We favor the hypothesis of an additional dust component as the carrier of this continuum.
  • Juvela, Mika (2019)
    Context. Thermal dust emission carries information on physical conditions and dust properties in many astronomical sources. Because observations represent a sum of emission along the line of sight, their interpretation often requires radiative transfer (RT) modelling. Aims. We describe a new RT program, SOC, for computations of dust emission, and examine its performance in simulations of interstellar clouds with external and internal heating. Methods. SOC implements the Monte Carlo RT method as a parallel program for shared-memory computers. It can be used to study dust extinction, scattering, and emission. We tested SOC with realistic cloud models and examined the convergence and noise of the dust-temperature estimates and of the resulting surface-brightness maps. Results. SOC has been demonstrated to produce accurate estimates for dust scattering and for thermal dust emission. It performs well with both CPUs and GPUs, the latter providing a speed-up of processing time by up to an order of magnitude. In the test cases, accelerated lambda iterations (ALIs) improved the convergence rates but was also sensitive to Monte Carlo noise. Run-time refinement of the hierarchical-grid models did not help in reducing the run times required for a given accuracy of solution. The use of a reference field, without ALI, works more robustly, and also allows the run time to be optimised if the number of photon packages is increased only as the iterations progress. Conclusions. The use of GPUs in RT computations should be investigated further.