Browsing by Subject "eddy covariance"

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  • Laasonen, Asta (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a chemically reactive trace gas in the atmosphere, indirectly affecting radiative balance. The oxidation of CO with hydroxyl radical (OH) is the large sink of atmospheric CO. The reactions of CO and OH decrease the atmospheric capacity to oxidize atmospheric methane (CH4), hence indirectly extends the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere. In addition, CO oxidation increases the abundance of tropospheric ozone (O3). CH4 and O3 are both very strong greenhouse gases, and it has been estimated that the cumulative indirect radiative forcing of CO can be even more significant than the third most powerful greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide. This study studied CO fluxes in four different ecosystems: a boreal forest, a boreal fen, a cropland in the boreal region, and a sisal plantation in the semi-arid tropical zone. All the ecosystems were CO sources during the growing season from May to August, and ecosystems showed strong seasonal variation. Fluxes had a regular diurnal cycle, peaking at noon and zero flux or small uptake at night. The main drivers for the CO emissions were radiation and air temperature. The strong correlation between radiation and CO flux proved that photodegradation was an important process in biogenic CO emissions. Radiation and air temperature were used in a simple linear regression model to estimate the biogenic CO emissions in the study sites. The model was trained for Hyytiälä data in 2016, tested for the rest of the data from Hyytiälä in 2015 and 2017 and other sites. The chamber measurements showed that soils were CO sinks and CO emissions were mainly from vegetation. Generally, in many upscaling models of CO, soil consumption is considered significantly larger than photodegradation. This study showed that many terrestrial ecosystems can be sources of CO, even though there are generally considered as a sink of CO. There is a need for ecosystem-scale flux measurements in other ecosystems and latitudes to understand better the global CO budget.
  • Lohila, Annalea (2008)
    Finnish Meteorological Institute Contributions
  • Heiskanen, Jouni J.; Mammarella, Ivan; Haapanala, Sami; Pumpanen, Jukka; Vesala, Timo; Macintyre, Sally; Ojala, Anne (2014)
  • Montagnani, Leonardo; Gruenwald, Thomas; Kowalski, Andrew; Mammarella, Ivan; Merbold, Lutz; Metzger, Stefan; Sedlak, Pavel; Siebicke, Lukas (2018)
    In eddy covariance measureinents, the storage flux represents the variation in time of the dry molar fraction of a given gas in the control volume representative of turbulent flux. Depending on the time scale considered, and on the height above ground of the measurements, it can either be a major component of the overall net ecosystem exchange or nearly negligible. Instrumental configuration and computational procedures must be optimized to measure this change at the time step used for the turbulent flux measurement Three different configurations are suitable within the Integrated Carbon Observation System infrastructure for the storage flux determination: separate sampling, subsequent sampling and mixed sampling. These configurations have their own advantages and disadvantages, and must be carefully selected based on the specific features of the considered station. In this paper, guidelines about number and distribution of vertical and horizontal sampling points are given. Details about suitable instruments, sampling devices, and computational procedures for the quantification of the storage flux of different GHG gases are also provided.
  • Marshall, John D.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Makela, Annikki; Peichl, Matthias; Hasselquist, Niles; Nasholm, Torgny (2021)
    Forests pass water and carbon through while converting portions to streamflow, soil organic matter, wood production, and other ecosystem services. The efficiencies of these transfers are but poorly quantified. New theory and new instruments have made it possible to use stable isotope composition to provide this quantification of efficiencies wherever there is a measurable difference between the branches of a branchpoint. We present a linked conceptual model that relies on isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen to describe these branchpoints along the pathway from precipitation to soil and biomass carbon sequestration and illustrate how it can be tested and generalized. Plain Language Summary The way a forest works can be described in terms of carbon and water budgets, which describe the ways that carbon and water flow through the forest. The paths of such flows are frequently branched and the branches are often different in their stable isotope composition. This means that stable isotopes can be used to describe the branching events. We present isotopic methods of quantifying several such events, then link them in a chain that begins with the evaporation of water and ends with biomass production.
  • Potes, M.; Salgado, R.; Costa, M. J.; Morais, M.; Bortoli, D.; Kostadinov, I.; Mammarella, I. (2017)
    The study of lake-atmosphere interactions was the main purpose of a 2014 summer experiment at Alqueva reservoir in Portugal. Near-surface fluxes of momentum, heat and mass [water vapour (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2)] were obtained with the new Campbell Scientific's IRGASON Integrated Open-Path CO2/H2O Gas Analyser and 3D Sonic Anemometer between 2 June and 2 October. On average, the reservoir was releasing energy in the form of sensible and latent heat flux during the study period. At the end of the 75 d, the total evaporation was estimated as 490.26 mm. A high correlation was found between the latent heat flux and the wind speed (R = 0.97). The temperature gradient between air and water was positive between 12 and 21 UTC, causing a negative sensible heat flux, and negative during the rest of the day, triggering a positive sensible heat flux. The reservoir acted as a sink of atmospheric CO2 with an average rate of -0.026 mg m(-2) s(-1). However, at a daily scale we found an unexpected uptake between 0 and 9 UTC and almost null flux between 13 and 19 UTC. Potential reasons for this result are further discussed. The net radiation was recorded for the same period and water column heat storage was estimated using water temperature profiles. The energy balance closure for the analysed period was 81%. In-water solar spectral downwelling irradiance profiles were measured with a new device allowing measurements independent of the solar zenith angle, which enabled the computation of the attenuation coefficient of light in the water column. The average attenuation coefficient for the photosynthetically active radiation spectral region varied from 0.849 +/- 0.025 m(-1) on 30 July to 1.459 +/- 0.007 m(-1) on 25 September.
  • Chan, Tommy; Berninger, Frank; Kolari, Pasi; Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu (2018)
    Current methods to study relations between stem respiration and stem growth have been hampered by problems in quantifying stem growth from dendrometer measurements, particularly on a daily time scale. This is mainly due to the water-related influences within these measurements that mask growth. A previously published model was used to remove water-related influences from measured radial stem variations to reveal a daily radial growth signal (ΔˆGm). We analysed the intra- and inter-annual relations between ΔˆGm and estimated growth respiration rates (Rg) on a daily scale for 5 years. Results showed that Rg was weakly correlated to stem growth prior to tracheid formation, but was significant during the early summer. In the late summer, the correlation decreased slightly relative to the early summer. A 1-day time lag was found of ΔˆGm preceding Rg. Using wavelet analysis and measurements from eddy covariance, it was found that Rg followed gross primary production and temperature with a 2 and 3 h time lag, respectively.This study shows that further in-depth analysis of in-situ growth and growth respiration dynamics is greatly needed, with a focus on cellular respiration at specific developmental stages, its woody tissue costs and linkages to source–sink processes and environmental drivers.
  • Musavi, Talie; Migliavacca, Mirco; van de Weg, Martine Janet; Kattge, Jens; Wohlfahrt, Georg; van Bodegom, Peter M.; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael; Carrara, Arnaud; Domingues, Tomas F.; Gavazzi, Michael; Gianelle, Damiano; Gimeno, Cristina; Granier, Andre; Gruening, Carsten; Havrankova, Katerina; Herbst, Mathias; Hrynkiw, Charmaine; Kalhori, Aram; Kaminski, Thomas; Klumpp, Katja; Kolari, Pasi; Longdoz, Bernard; Minerbi, Stefano; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy; Oechel, Walter C.; Reich, Peter B.; Rohatyn, Shani; Rossi, Alessandra; Rotenberg, Eyal; Varlagin, Andrej; Wilkinson, Matthew; Wirth, Christian; Mahecha, Miguel D. (2016)
    The aim of this study was to systematically analyze the potential and limitations of using plant functional trait observations from global databases versus in situ data to improve our understanding of vegetation impacts on ecosystem functional properties (EFPs). Using ecosystem photosynthetic capacity as an example, we first provide an objective approach to derive robust EFP estimates from gross primary productivity (GPP) obtained from eddy covariance flux measurements. Second, we investigate the impact of synchronizing EFPs and plant functional traits in time and space to evaluate their relationships, and the extent to which we can benefit from global plant trait databases to explain the variability of ecosystem photosynthetic capacity. Finally, we identify a set of plant functional traits controlling ecosystem photosynthetic capacity at selected sites. Suitable estimates of the ecosystem photosynthetic capacity can be derived from light response curve of GPP responding to radiation (photosynthetically active radiation or absorbed photosynthetically active radiation). Although the effect of climate is minimized in these calculations, the estimates indicate substantial interannual variation of the photosynthetic capacity, even after removing site-years with confounding factors like disturbance such as fire events. The relationships between foliar nitrogen concentration and ecosystem photosynthetic capacity are tighter when both of the measurements are synchronized in space and time. When using multiple plant traits simultaneously as predictors for ecosystem photosynthetic capacity variation, the combination of leaf carbon to nitrogen ratio with leaf phosphorus content explains the variance of ecosystem photosynthetic capacity best (adjusted R-2 = 0.55). Overall, this study provides an objective approach to identify links between leaf level traits and canopy level processes and highlights the relevance of the dynamic nature of ecosystems. Synchronizing measurements of eddy covariance fluxes and plant traits in time and space is shown to be highly relevant to better understand the importance of intra-and interspecific trait variation on ecosystem functioning.
  • Nordbo, Annika; Jarvi, Leena; Vesala, Timo (2012)
    Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat and latent heat—in addition to net radiation measurements—were conducted for three consecutive years in an urban environment: Helsinki, Finland. The aims were to: (i) quantify the detection limit and random uncertainty of turbulent fluxes, (ii) assess the systematic error caused by EC calculation-procedure choices on the energy balance residual, and (iii) report the energy balance of the world’s northernmost urban flux station. The mean detection limits were about 10% of the observed flux, and the random uncertainty was 9–16%. Of all fluxes, the latent heat flux— as measured with a closed-path gas analyzer—was most prone to systematic calculation errors due to water vapor interactions with tube walls: using a lag window that is too small can cause a 15% lack of data (due to the dependency of lag time on relative humidity) and omitting spectral corrections can cause on average a 26% underestimation of the flux. The systematic errors in EC calculation propagate into the energy balance residual and can be larger than the residual itself: for example, omitting spectral corrections overestimates the residual by 13% or 18% on average, depending on the analyzer.
  • Jarvi, Leena; Havu, Minttu; Ward, Helen C.; Bellucco, Veronica; McFadden, Joseph P.; Toivonen, Tuuli; Heikinheimo, Vuokko; Kolari, Pasi; Riikonen, Anu; Grimmond, C. Sue B. (2019)
    There is a growing need to simulate the effect of urban planning on both local climate and greenhouse gas emissions. Here, a new urban surface carbon dioxide (CO2) flux module for the Surface Urban Energy and Water Balance Scheme is described and evaluated using eddy covariance observations at two sites in Helsinki in 2012. The spatial variability and magnitude of local-scale anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 flux components at high spatial (250 m x 250 m) and temporal (hourly) resolution are examined by combining high-resolution (down to 2 m) airborne lidar-derived land use data and mobility data to account for people's movement. Urban effects are included in the biogenic components parameterized using urban eddy covariance and chamber observations. Surface Urban Energy and Water Balance Scheme reproduces the seasonal and diurnal variability of the CO2 flux well. Annual totals deviate 3% from observations in the city center and 2% in a suburban location. In the latter, traffic is the dominant CO2 source but summertime vegetation partly offsets traffic-related emissions. In the city center, emissions from traffic and human metabolism dominate and the vegetation effect is minor due to the low proportion of vegetation surface cover (22%). Within central Helsinki, human metabolism accounts for 39% of the net local-scale emissions and together with road traffic is to a large extent responsible for the spatial variability of the emissions. Annually, the biogenic emissions and sinks are in near balance and thus the effect of vegetation on the carbon balance is small in this high-latitude city.
  • Park, Sung-Bin; Knohl, Alexander; Migliavacca, Mirco; Thum, Tea; Vesala, Timo; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kolle, Olaf; Lavric, Jost; Park, Sang Seo; Heimann, Martin (2021)
    Climate change impacts the characteristics of the vegetation carbon-uptake process in the northern Eurasian terrestrial ecosystem. However, the currently available direct CO2 flux measurement datasets, particularly for central Siberia, are insufficient for understanding the current condition in the northern Eurasian carbon cycle. Here, we report daily and seasonal interannual variations in CO2 fluxes and associated abiotic factors measured using eddy covariance in a coniferous forest and a bog near Zotino, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, for April to early June, 2013-2017. Despite the snow not being completely melted, both ecosystems became weak net CO2 sinks if the air temperature was warm enough for photosynthesis. The forest became a net CO2 sink 7-16 days earlier than the bog. After the surface soil temperature exceeded similar to 1 degrees C, the ecosystems became persistent net CO2 sinks. Net ecosystem productivity was highest in 2015 for both ecosystems because of the anomalously high air temperature in May compared with other years. Our findings demonstrate that long-term monitoring of flux measurements at the site level, particularly during winter and its transition to spring, is essential for understanding the responses of the northern Eurasian ecosystem to spring warming.
  • Ripamonti, Giovanna; Jarvi, Leena; Molgaard, Bjarke; Hussein, Tareq; Nordbo, Annika; Hameri, Kaarle (2013)
  • Haeni, M.; Zweifel, R.; Eugster, W.; Gessler, A.; Zielis, S.; Bernhofer, C.; Carrara, A.; Gruenwald, T.; Havrankova, K.; Heinesch, B.; Herbst, M.; Ibrom, A.; Knohl, A.; Lagergren, F.; Law, B. E.; Marek, M.; Matteucci, G.; McCaughey, J. H.; Minerbi, S.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.; Olejnik, J.; Pavelka, M.; Pilegaard, K.; Pita, G.; Rodrigues, A.; Sanz Sanchez, M. J.; Schelhaas, M. -J.; Urbaniak, M.; Valentini, R.; Varlagin, A.; Vesala, T.; Vincke, C.; Wu, J.; Buchmann, N. (2017)
    Accurate predictions of net ecosystem productivity (NEPc) of forest ecosystems are essential for climate change decisions and requirements in the context of national forest growth and greenhouse gas inventories. However, drivers and underlying mechanisms determining NEPc (e.g., climate and nutrients) are not entirely understood yet, particularly when considering the influence of past periods. Here we explored the explanatory power of the compensation day (cDOY)defined as the day of year when winter net carbon losses are compensated by spring assimilationfor NEPc in 26 forests in Europe, North America, and Australia, using different NEPc integration methods. We found cDOY to be a particularly powerful predictor for NEPc of temperate evergreen needleleaf forests (R-2=0.58) and deciduous broadleaf forests (R-2=0.68). In general, the latest cDOY correlated with the lowest NEPc. The explanatory power of cDOY depended on the integration method for NEPc, forest type, and whether the site had a distinct winter net respiratory carbon loss or not. The integration methods starting in autumn led to better predictions of NEPc from cDOY then the classical calendar method starting 1 January. Limited explanatory power of cDOY for NEPc was found for warmer sites with no distinct winter respiratory loss period. Our findings highlight the importance of the influence of winter processes and the delayed responses of previous seasons' climatic conditions on current year's NEPc. Such carry-over effects may contain information from climatic conditions, carbon storage levels, and hydraulic traits of several years back in time.