Browsing by Subject "electrocardiography"

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  • Reinier, Kyndaron; Aro, Aapo L.; Uy-Evanado, Audrey; Rusinaru, Carmen; Chugh, Harpriya S.; Shiota, Takahiro; Jui, Jonathan; Chugh, Sumeet S. (2018)
    Background Early diagnosis and therapy improves outcomes in heart failure with severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 35% to have >= 1 conventional ECG abnormality. In the subset without conventional ECG abnormalities, >= 4 abnormal ECG markers from the expanded panel were found in 12% vs. 1% of patients with LVEF 35%, respectively. In the validation population (n = 9,742), 44% with LVEF 35% had >= 1 conventional ECG abnormality. In patients without conventional ECG abnormalities (n = 7,601), 40% with LVEF 35% had >= 4 abnormal ECG markers from the expanded panel. Each additional abnormal ECG marker from the expanded panel (range 0 to >= 4) more than doubled the odds of LVEF
  • Toukola, Tomi; Junttila, M. Juhani; Holmström, Lauri T. A.; Haukilahti, M. Anette; Tikkanen, Jani T.; Terho, Henri; Kenttä, Tuomas V.; Aro, Aapo L.; Anttonen, Olli; Kerola, Tuomas; Pakanen, Lasse; Kortelainen, Marja-Leena; Kiviniemi, Antti; Huikuri, Heikki V. (2018)
    Introduction: Little is known about the association between electrocardiographic abnormalities and exercise-related sudden cardiac death.Therefore, our aim was to identify possible electrocardiographic findings related to exercise-induced sudden cardiac death. Methods and results: The FinGesture study includes 3,989 consecutive sudden cardiac deaths in northern Finland between 1998 and 2012, out of whom a total of 647 subjects had a previously recorded electrocardiography acquired from the archives of Oulu University Hospital. In 276 of these cases the death was witnessed, and the activity at the time of death was either rest or physical exercise (PEj; in 40 {14%} cases sudden cardiac death was exercise-related and in 236 (86%) cases death took place at rest. Fragmented QRS complex in at least two consecutive leads within anterior leads (V1-V3) was more common in the exercise-group compared to rest-group (17 of 40, 43% vs. 51 of 236,22%, P = 0.005). Pathologic Q wave in anterior leads was more common in the PE group (9 of 40,23% vs. 26 of 236,11%; P = 0.044). Median QRS duration was prolonged in the exercise-group compared to the rest-group (100 milliseconds vs. 94 milliseconds, P = 0.047), QTc interval, the prevalence of inverted T-waves, or other electrocardiographic abnormalities did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusions: As a conclusion, fragmented QRS complex in the anterior leads is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death during PE.
  • Acosta Leinonen, Johanna Natalia (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Sleep is one of the most vital functions of newborns and infants, and it is essential for neuronal network development. Therefore, long-term sleep disturbances have been associated with growth delays and behavioral disorders. Commonly reported infant sleep disturbances, such as night awakenings and difficulties falling asleep, cause distress to parents. Yet, the development of infant sleep in the home environment has not been fully elucidated due to lack of objective measurement parameters. In the current study, we assessed the feasibility of a motion sensor, attached to wearable pants, and ECG textile electrodes to monitor sleep-related respiration and heart rate of newborns and infants. First, we compared signals recorded by the motion sensor’s measurement channels to the standard respiratory piezo effort belt’s signal during daytime EEG recordings. According to our results, the motion sensor’s gyroscope proved to measure respiratory rate most accurately, while the ECG signal transmitted by the sensor was reliable in interpretable sections. We then provided wearable garments and smartphones to families with infants to assess overnight home-use. Our results indicate that different sleep states could likely be identified based on respiration fluctuation visible in the gyroscope’s signals. Moreover, the wearable system was considered practical and easy to use by the parents. Future studies should focus on validating the sensor with clinically approved measures, in order to train the algorithms to automatically identify different sleep-wake states. By doing so, the wearable sensor could provide information on natural infant sleep structure development over long time periods. Additionally, clinical validation of the sensor may result in the development of a companion diagnostic tool for infant cardiorespiratory and movement disorders.