Browsing by Subject "endothelial cells"

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  • Oikari, Lotta E.; Pandit, Rucha; Stewart, Romal; Cuní-López, Carla; Quek, Hazel; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Rantanen, Laura M.; Oksanen, Minna; Lehtonen, Sarka; de Boer, Carmela Maria; Polo, Jose M.; Götz, Jürgen; Koistinaho, Jari; White, Anthony R. (2020)
    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a barrier for circulating factors, but simultaneously challenges drug delivery. How the BBB is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) is not fully understood. To facilitate this analysis, we derived brain endothelial cells (iBECs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) of several patients carrying the familial AD PSEN1 mutation. We demonstrate that, compared with isogenic PSEN1 corrected and control iBECs, AD-iBECs exhibit altered tight and adherens junction protein expression as well as efflux properties. Furthermore, by applying focused ultrasound (FUS) that transiently opens the BBB and achieves multiple therapeutic effects in AD mouse models, we found an altered permeability to 3-5 kDa dextran as a model cargo and the amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide in AD-iBECs compared with control iBECs. This presents human-derived in vitro models of the BBB as a valuable tool to understand its role and properties in a disease context, with possible implications for drug delivery.
  • Komulainen, Anne (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and devastating disease with poorly understood pathogenesis. It is characterized by abnormal remodelling of pulmonary vasculature due to uncontrolled apoptosis and proliferation of endothelial (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vascular wall. In severe PAH pulmonary ECs exhibit hyperproliferative and apoptosis resistant phenotype contributing to the formation of neointima and development of plexiformic lesions. Structural changes promote occlusion of vascular lumen, and thus, increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. To date we lack efficient therapy to prevent vascular remodelling and restore normal vascular function in PAH. Purinergic signalling is potential modulator of pulmonary vascular homeostasis. It comprises of extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, which signal through their receptors on cell membrane. Ectoenzymes with nucleotide hydrolyzing activity have an essential part in controlling homeostasis and physiologic concentration of extracellular nucleotides. Ectoenzyme CD39 plays a crucial role in dephosphorylating ATP, which is a known mediator of inflammation, angiogenesis, thrombosis and vasoconstriction according to previous research. Aims of this project were to study the role of extracellular ATP in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction during PAH pathogenesis. The goal was to evaluate the significance of ATPases, such as CD39, in the disease process and to identify significant ATP receptors on pulmonary ECs. We utilized a previously unused strategy to monitor ATPase activity in vivo in pulmonary endothelium of rats with PAH. With this strategy we could identify changes in a time-line manner. Our results indicate that ATPase activity is significantly attenuated in ECs during disease process. Similar finding was also observed in human pulmonary EC isolated from PAH patients suggesting that loss of ATPase activity mediated increase of extracellular ATP could play a role in disease pathogenesis. Our in vitro experiments reveal that loss-of CD39 in human pulmonary ECs leads to an apoptosis resistant and hyperproliferative phenotype. We also identify that purinergic receptor P2Y11 is a critical mediator of ATP responses in these ECs. Suppression of ATP mediated P2Y11 response in apoptosis resistant PAH patient ECs restores normal EC phenotype and thus, suggests a novel therapeutic strategy for pulmonary occlusive vasculopathy.
  • Ekman, Niklas (University of Helsinki, 1999)
  • Duy Nguyen, Su; Maaninka, Katariina; Lappalainen, Jani; Nurmi, Katariina; Metso, Jari; Oorni, Katariina; Navab, Mohamad; Fogelman, Alan M.; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Kovanen, Petri T. (2016)
    Objective Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) has been shown to possess several atheroprotective functions, including inhibition of inflammation. Protease-secreting activated mast cells reside in human atherosclerotic lesions. Here we investigated the effects of the neutral proteases released by activated mast cells on the anti-inflammatory properties of apoA-I. Approach and Results Activation of human mast cells triggered the release of granule-associated proteases chymase, tryptase, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A, and granzyme B. Among them, chymase cleaved apoA-I with the greatest efficiency and generated C-terminally truncated apoA-I, which failed to bind with high affinity to human coronary artery endothelial cells. In tumor necrosis factor--activated human coronary artery endothelial cells, the chymase-cleaved apoA-I was unable to suppress nuclear factor-B-dependent upregulation of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and to block THP-1 cells from adhering to and transmigrating across the human coronary artery endothelial cells. Chymase-cleaved apoA-I also had an impaired ability to downregulate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8 in lipopolysaccharide-activated GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor)- and M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor)-differentiated human macrophage foam cells and to inhibit reactive oxygen species formation in PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate)-activated human neutrophils. Importantly, chymase-cleaved apoA-I showed reduced ability to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in vivo in mice. Treatment with chymase blocked the ability of the apoA-I mimetic peptide L-4F, but not of the protease-resistant D-4F, to inhibit proinflammatory gene expression in activated human coronary artery endothelial cells and macrophage foam cells and to prevent reactive oxygen species formation in activated neutrophils. Conclusions The findings identify C-terminal cleavage of apoA-I by human mast cell chymase as a novel mechanism leading to loss of its anti-inflammatory functions. When targeting inflamed protease-rich atherosclerotic lesions with apoA-I, infusions of protease-resistant apoA-I might be the appropriate approach.
  • Kareinen, Ilona; Baumann, Marc; Su Duy Nguyen; Maaninka, Katariina; Anisimov, Andrey; Tozuka, Minoru; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Kovanen, Petri T. (2018)
    ApoA-I, the main structural and functional protein of HDL particles, is cardioprotective, but also highly sensitive to proteolytic cleavage. Here, we investigated the effect of cardiac mast cell activation and ensuing chymase secretion on apoA-I degradation using isolated rat hearts in the Langendorff perfusion system. Cardiac mast cells were activated by injection of compound 48/80 into the coronary circulation or by low-flow myocardial ischemia, after which lipid-free apoA-I was injected and collected in the coronary effluent for cleavage analysis. Mast cell activation by 48/80 resulted in apoA-I cleavage at sites Tyr(192) and Phe(229), but hypoxic activation at Tyr(192) only. In vitro, the proteolytic end-product of apoA-I with either rat or human chymase was the Tyr(192)-truncated fragment. This fragment, when compared with intact apoA-I, showed reduced ability to promote migration of cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells in a wound-healing assay. We propose that C-terminal truncation of apoA-I by chymase released from cardiac mast cells during ischemia impairs the ability of apoA-I to heal damaged endothelium in the ischemic myocardium.
  • Panahi, Mahmod; Mesri, Naeimeh Yousefi; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Coupland, Kirsten G.; Forsell, Charlotte; Graff, Caroline; Tikka, Saara; Winblad, Bengt; Viitanen, Matti; Karlström, Helena; Sundström, Erik; Behbahani, Homira (2018)
    Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familial fatal progressive degenerative disorder. One of the pathological hallmarks of CADASIL is a dramatic reduction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in cerebral arteries. Using VSMCs from the vasculature of the human umbilical cord, placenta and cerebrum of CADASIL patients, we found that CADASIL VSMCs had a lower proliferation rate compared to control VSMCs. Exposure of control VSMCs and endothelial cells (ECs) to media derived from CADASIL VSMCs lowered the proliferation rate of all cells examined. By quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we observed increased Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) gene expression in CADASIL VSMCs. Adding TGF beta-neutralizing antibody restored the proliferation rate of CADASIL VSMCs. We assessed proliferation differences in the presence or absence of TGF beta-neutralizing antibody in ECs co-cultured with VSMCs. ECs co-cultured with CADASIL VSMCs exhibited a lower proliferation rate than those co-cultured with control VSMCs, and neutralization of TGF beta normalized the proliferation rate of ECs co-cultured with CADASIL VSMCs. We suggest that increased TGF beta expression in CADASIL VSMCs is involved in the reduced VSMC proliferation in CADASIL and may play a role in situ in altered proliferation of neighbouring cells in the vasculature.
  • Helle, Emmi; Ampuja, Minna; Antola, Laura; Kivelä, Riikka (2020)
    The vascular system is essential for the development and function of all organs and tissues in our body. The molecular signature and phenotype of endothelial cells (EC) are greatly affected by blood flow-induced shear stress, which is a vital component of vascular development and homeostasis. Recent advances in differentiation of ECs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) have enabled development of in vitro experimental models of the vasculature containing cells from healthy individuals or from patients harboring genetic variants or diseases of interest. Here we have used hiPSC-derived ECs and bulk- and single-cell RNA sequencing to study the effect of flow on the transcriptomic landscape of hiPSC-ECs and their heterogeneity. We demonstrate that hiPS-ECs are plastic and they adapt to flow by expressing known flow-induced genes. Single-cell RNA sequencing showed that flow induced a more homogenous and homeostatically more stable EC population compared to static cultures, as genes related to cell polarization, barrier formation and glucose and fatty acid transport were induced. The hiPS-ECs increased both arterial and venous markers when exposed to flow. Interestingly, while in general there was a greater increase in the venous markers, one cluster with more arterial-like hiPS-ECs was detected. Single-cell RNA sequencing revealed that not all hiPS-ECs are similar even after sorting, but exposing them to flow increases their homogeneity. Since hiPS-ECs resemble immature ECs and demonstrate high plasticity in response to flow, they provide an excellent model to study vascular development.
  • Helle, Emmi; Ampuja, Minna; Dainis, Alexandra; Antola, Laura; Temmes, Elina; Tolvanen, Erik; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka (2021)
    Cell-cell interactions are crucial for organ development and function. In the heart, endothelial cells engage in bidirectional communication with cardiomyocytes regulating cardiac development and growth. We aimed to elucidate the organotypic development of cardiac endothelial cells and cardiomyocyte and endothelial cell crosstalk using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). Single-cell RNA sequencing was performed with hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) and endothelial cells (hiPS-ECs) in mono- and co-culture. The presence of hiPS-CMs led to increased expression of transcripts related to vascular development and maturation, cardiac development, as well as cardiac endothelial cell and endocardium-specific genes in hiPS-ECs. Interestingly, co-culture induced the expression of cardiomyocyte myofibrillar genes and MYL7 and MYL4 protein expression was detected in hiPS-ECs. Major regulators of BMP- and Notch-signaling pathways were induced in both cell types in co-culture. These results reflect the findings from animal studies and extend them to human endothelial cells, demonstrating the importance of EC-CM interactions during development.
  • Strandin, Tomas; Mäkelä, Satu; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti (2018)
    Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in humans. Both diseases are considered to be immunologically mediated but the exact pathological mechanisms are still poorly understood. Neutrophils are considered the first line of defense against invading microbes but little is still known of their role in virus infections. We wanted to study the role of neutrophils in HFRS using blood and tissue samples obtained from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV)-infected patients. We found that neutrophil activation products myeloperoxidase and neutrophil elastase, together with interleukin-8 (the major neutrophil chemotactic factor in humans), are strongly elevated in blood of acute PUUV-HFRS and positively correlate with kidney dysfunction, the hallmark clinical finding of HFRS. These markers localized mainly in the tubulointerstitial space in the kidneys of PUUV-HFRS patients suggesting neutrophil activation to be a likely component of the general immune response toward hantaviruses. We also observed increased levels of circulating extracellular histones at the acute stage of the disease supporting previous findings of neutrophil extracellular trap formation in PUUV-HFRS. Mechanistically, we did not find evidence for direct PUUV-mediated activation of neutrophils but instead primary blood microvascular endothelial cells acquired a pro-inflammatory phenotype and promoted neutrophil degranulation in response to PUUV infection in vitro. These results suggest that neutrophils are activated by hantavirus-infected endothelial cells and may contribute to the kidney pathology which determines the severity of HFRS.