Browsing by Subject "enterovirus A71"

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  • Lai, Jeffrey K. F.; Sam, I-Ching; Verlhac, Pauline; Baguet, Joel; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Faure, Mathias; Chan, Yoke Fun (2017)
    Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17). Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29). Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes) as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.
  • Hayes, A.; Nguyen, D.; Andersson, M.; Anton, A.; Bailly, J-L; Beard, S.; Benschop, K. S. M.; Berginc, N.; Blomqvist, S.; Cunningham, E.; Davis, D.; Dembinski, J. L.; Diedrich, S.; Dudman, S. G.; Dyrdak, R.; Eltringham, G. J. A.; Gonzales-Goggia, S.; Gunson, R.; Howson-Wells, H. C.; Jääskeläinen, A. J.; Lopez-Labrador, F. X.; Maier, M.; Majumdar, M.; Midgley, S.; Mirand, A.; Morley, U.; Nordbo, S. A.; Oikarinen, S.; Osman, H.; Papa, A.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Piralla, A.; Rabella, N.; Richter, J.; Smith, M.; Strand, A. Söderlund; Templeton, K.; Vipond, B.; Vuorinen, T.; Williams, C.; Wollants, E.; Zakikhany, K.; Fischer, T. K.; Harvala, H.; Simmonds, P. (2020)
    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection has become the gold standard for diagnosis and typing of enterovirus (EV) and human parechovirus (HPeV) infections. Its effectiveness depends critically on using the appropriate sample types and high assay sensitivity as viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid samples from meningitis and sepsis clinical presentation can be extremely low. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of currently used commercial and in-house diagnostic and typing assays. Accurately quantified RNA transcript controls were distributed to 27 diagnostic and 12 reference laboratories in 17 European countries for blinded testing. Transcripts represented the four human EV species (EV-A71, echovirus 30, coxsackie A virus 21, and EV-D68), HPeV3, and specificity controls. Reported results from 48 in-house and 15 commercial assays showed 98% detection frequencies of high copy (1000 RNA copies/5 mu L) transcripts. In-house assays showed significantly greater detection frequencies of the low copy (10 copies/5 mu L) EV and HPeV transcripts (81% and 86%, respectively) compared with commercial assays (56%, 50%; P = 7 x 10(-5)). EV-specific PCRs showed low cross-reactivity with human rhinovirus C (3 of 42 tests) and infrequent positivity in the negative control (2 of 63 tests). Most or all high copy EV and HPeV controls were successfully typed (88%, 100%) by reference laboratories, but showed reduced effectiveness for low copy controls (41%, 67%). Stabilized RNA transcripts provide an effective, logistically simple and inexpensive reagent for evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The study provides reassurance of the performance of the many in-house assay formats used across Europe. However, it identified often substantially reduced sensitivities of commercial assays often used as point-of-care tests.