Browsing by Subject "feed"

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  • Lähteenmäki-Uutela, Anu; Rahikainen, Moona; Camarena-Gómez, María Teresa; Piiparinen, Jonna; Spilling, Kristian; Yang, Baoru (Springer Nature, 2021)
    Aquaculture International 29 (2021), 487–509
    Macroalgae-based products are increasing in demand also in Europe. In the European Union, each category of macroalgae-based products is regulated separately. We discuss EU legislation, including the law on medicinal products, foods including food supplements and food additives, feed and feed additives, cosmetics, packaging materials, fertilizers and biostimulants, as well as biofuels. Product safety and consumer protection are the priorities with any new products. Macroalgae products can be sold as traditional herbal medicines. The novel food regulation applies to macroalgae foods that have not previously been used as food, and organic macroalgae are a specific regulatory category. The maximum levels of heavy metals may be a barrier for macroalgae foods, feeds, and fertilizers. Getting health claims approved for foods based on macroalgae is demanding. In addition to the rules on products, the macroalgae business is strongly impacted by the elements of the general regulatory environment such as agricultural/aquacultural subsidies, maritime spatial planning and aquaculture licensing, public procurement criteria, tax schemes, and trade agreements.
  • Kukkola, Mari (Helsingfors universitet, 2013)
    The literature review focused on the chemistry, uses, occurrence and toxicology of pesticide residues. Emphasis was placed on residue analytics and GC-MS/MS-methods. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable and reproducible GC-MS/MS-multi residue method for the determination of pesticide residues in poultry feed. First, two available sample preparation methods were compared. The methods chosen for comparison were QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, Safe) based on dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) and a liquid-liquid extraction method. In the former, the residues were extracted with water-acetonitrile mixture and the content of the dSPE tube containing MgSO4 was added to the extract to induce the liquid-liquid partitioning of the residues. The extract was then cleaned with primary and secondary amine (PSA) and octadecylsilane (C18) absorbents, filtered and analysed by GC-MS/MS. Based on the comparison, the QuEChERS method was chosen for the validation experiments. The QuEChERS method was proven to be a quick and simple method that provided better trueness than the other compared method. The repeatability was sufficient for 54 residue compounds. However, the recovery was between 70-120 % for 28 analytes and mainly less than 70 % for the remaining compounds. The limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg for 48 analytes. The developed multi residue method can be used for reliable and reproducible determination of 24 pesticide residues in poultry feed whereas the assessment of the method for the remaining compounds will be continued. After a more comprehensive evaluation, the method can be applied for other feed matrices in future multi residue studies.
  • Rönnqvist, Maria; Välttilä, Ville; Heinola, Katriina; Ranta, Jukka; Niemi, Jarkko; Tuominen, Pirkko (Evira, 2018)
    Evira Research Reports 3/2018
    Food items of animal origin, such as pork products, have been suggested as the main source of zoonotic salmonella infections in Europe. Contaminated feed can potentially introduce the pathogen into the animal-derived food chains. The prevalence of salmonella in different feeds for Finnish pigs was estimated as below 2% (medians) and on average in pigs 0.25% (mean). Feed was estimated on average as the cause of 35% of salmonella infections in fattening pigs and 55% in sows. Around 5% of the 300–400 domestic human salmonella infections reported per year were estimated as attributable to pig feeds. Year 2013 was employed as a reference. The present costs for the prevention of salmonella contamination in pig feeds were estimated at 1.8–3.0 million euros per year for the year 2013. The costs due to feed contamination, measures due to detected contamination and the resulting salmonella infections in pigs and humans were estimated at €2.4 (0.3–6.1) million annually. According to a scenario, if salmonella prevalence in Finnish pig feed would be similar to that acquired using data from other EU counties, the prevalence in fattening pigs and people could increase by 55-fold on average. If specific measures to eliminate salmonella from feed were not carried out, the costs due to preventive actions against salmonella were at least €1.1–1.8 million per year. Additionally, the costs due to the eradication of feedborne salmonella on pig farms, consequential measures at slaughterhouses, and the health costs to humans could rise to approximately €33 million per year. According to the results, the present feed salmonella control, including the preventive
  • EFSA Panel Contaminants Food Chain; Knutsen, Helle; Alexander, Jan; Barregård, Lars; Bignami; Bruschweiler; Ceccatelli; Cottrill; Dinovi; Edler; Grasl-Kraupp; Hogstrand; Nebbia; Oswald; Petersen; Rose; Roudot; Schwerdtle; Vleminckx; Vollmer; Wallace; Furst; Håkansson, Helen; Halldorsson; Lundebye; Pohjanvirta, Raimo Kalevi; Rylander; Smith; van Loveren; Waalkens-Berendsen; Zeilmaker; Binaglia; Gomez Ruiz; Horvath; Christoph; Ciccolallo; Ramos Bordajandi; Steinkellner; Hoogenboom, Ron (2018)
    The European Commission asked EFSA for a scientific opinion on the risks for animal and human health related to the presence of dioxins (PCDD/Fs) and DL-PCBs in feed and food. The data from experimental animal and epidemiological studies were reviewed and it was decided to base the human risk assessment on effects observed in humans and to use animal data as supportive evidence. The critical effect was on semen quality, following pre- and postnatal exposure. The critical study showed a NOAEL of 7.0 pg WHO2005-TEQ/g fat in blood sampled at age 9 years based on PCDD/F-TEQs. No association was observed when including DL-PCB-TEQs. Using toxicokinetic modelling and taking into account the exposure from breastfeeding and a twofold higher intake during childhood, it was estimated that daily exposure in adolescents and adults should be below 0.25 pg TEQ/kg bw/day. The CONTAM Panel established a TWI of 2 pg TEQ/kg bw/week. With occurrence and consumption data from European countries, the mean and P95 intake of total TEQ by Adolescents, Adults, Elderly and Very Elderly varied between, respectively, 2.1 to 10.5, and 5.3 to 30.4 pg TEQ/kg bw/week, implying a considerable exceedance of the TWI. Toddlers and Other Children showed a higher exposure than older age groups, but this was accounted for when deriving the TWI. Exposure to PCDD/F-TEQ only was on average 2.4- and 2.7-fold lower for mean and P95 exposure than for total TEQ. PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs are transferred to milk and eggs, and accumulate in fatty tissues and liver. Transfer rates and bioconcentration factors were identified for various species. The CONTAM Panel was not able to identify reference values in most farm and companion animals with the exception of NOAELs for mink, chicken and some fish species. The estimated exposure from feed for these species does not imply a risk.