Browsing by Subject "food control"

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  • Bäckman, Hanna (Helsingfors universitet, 2007)
    The Purpose of the Finnish Hygiene Act (The Act on Food Hygiene of Foodstuff of Animal Origin 1195/1996), which was in force until the beginning of March 2006, was to ensure the hygienic quality of foodstuffs of animal origin and prevent the spread of infections from animals to humans via foodstuffs. The Hygiene Act applied to handling, hygienic quality requirements and inspections prior to retail of foodstuff of animal origin. The aim of official food control is to ensure that establishments fulfil the requirements imposed on them by the legislation. According to The Hygiene Act, abattoirs and establishments connected to them were controlled by an official veterinarian working for The National Food Agency, and other establishments controlled by the municipal authorities. Each municipality or federation of municipality was responsible for the official control in its own region. The inspection frequencies depended on the type of establishment, but all establishments had to be inspected regularly. The purpose of this study was to investigate how official control was perceived in establishments covered by the Hygiene Act in terms of effects and congruence of the official control and guidance received from the authorities. The aim was also to investigate the influence of control frequency on perceptions on effects, congruence and guidance. The research was performed in spring 2006 using a questionnaire, which was issued to all establishments in meat branch, establishments handling fishery products, dairy plants, egg packing centres and warehouses of foodstuffs of animal origin registered as approved establishments by The National Food Agency in 2005. 459 answers were received, which was 36 % of the questionnaires sent. The results show that the food control had improved the hygiene of the establishments according to the perceptions of the establishments. Product safety was considered to be improved by the official control more in small and medium-sized establishments than in large establishments. EU-establishments in meat branch have made more changes to their production processes and line of production due to food control than other types of establishments. Approximately one half of the respondents were unable to provide a view on congruence of official control. Incongruence was experienced most frequently in low-capacity slaughterhouses. High inspection frequency was found to be connected to the experience of incongruence. The higher the inspection frequency, the higher was the perceived incongruence of official control. Most establishments were satisfied with the amount of guidance concerning the legislation they had been given by the official inspector. However, more guidance was needed on the planning of the own-check, construction of production facilities, expansion and repair of production facilities and correction of the shortcomings found during inspections. The frequency of inspections was also found to have an effect on perceived benefit of official control. The more frequent the control inspections performed by the municipal control authorities were, the higher was the perceived positive impact on hygiene.
  • Finnish Food Authority (Finnish Food Authority, 2019)
    Finnish Food Authority publications 5/2019
    This report presents for the year 2018 the results of regulatory control related to food safety, official controls and monitoring programmes on food and feed, as well as research and risk assessments. The report also assesses, based on the results, the status of food safety and future needs for regulatory activities in Finland. The report extends the annual report referred to in EU Control Regulation (EC) No. 882/2004 with respect to food safety where the annual report describes the results of control in the various sectors of the food supply chain as a whole. The results of regulatory control and research in 2018 demonstrate a good status of food safety in Finland. Domestically produced food does not contain chemical substances in levels that would be dangerous to the consumer. Foodstuffs tested contain food-poisoning causing bacteria in very low concentrations. The number of food-borne epidemics as well as the number of people affected increased notably from the previous year. The reason for this increase was mainly due to illnesses caused by noroviruses. The number of food frauds is increasing and fraudulent activities are also found in Finland. The number of food withdrawals is still increasing. As a rule, food sector companies operating in Finland meet food safety requirements excellently or very well. Severe shortcomings occur in very low numbers.
  • Finnish Food Authority (Finnish Food Authority, 2020)
    Finnish Food Authority publications 4/2020
    This report presents for the year 2019 the results of regulatory control related to food safety, official controls and monitoring programmes on food and feed, as well as research and risk assessments. The report also assesses, based on the results, the status of food safety and future needs for regulatory activities in Finland. The report extends the annual report referred to in the EU Control Regulation (EC) No. 882/2004, starting from 14.12.2019 the Official Controls Regulation (EU) 2017/625, with respect to food safety where the annual report describes the results of control in the various sectors of the food supply chain as a whole. The results of regulatory control and research in 2019 demonstrate a good status of food safety in Finland. Domestically produced food does not contain chemical substances in levels that would be dangerous to the consumer. Foodstuffs tested contain food-poisoning causing bacteria in very low concentrations. The number of food-borne epidemics as well as the number of people affected has decreased from the previous year. The amount of epidemics as well as the number of people affected varies significantly from year to year. The main pathogen in 2019 was still the norovirus. It spreads easily with the affected and often causes disease in large groups of people. The number of food frauds is increasing and fraudulent activities are also found in Finland. The number of food withdrawals is still increasing. As a rule, food sector companies operating in Finland meet food safety requirements excellently or very well. Severe shortcomings occur in very low numbers.
  • Finnish Food Authority (Finnish Food Authority, 2021)
    Finnish Food Authority publications 5/2021
    This report presents the 2020 results of regulatory control related to food safety, official controls and monitoring programmes on food and feed as well as research and risk assessments. The report also assesses, based on the results, the status of food safety and future needs for regulatory activities in Finland. The report extends the annual report referred to in the EU Control Regulation (EU) No. 2017/625 on official controls with respect to food safety; the annual report describes the results of the control in the various sectors of the food supply chain as a whole. The results of official controls and investigations from 2020 show that food safety is at a good level in Finland despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Domestic products do not contain such quantities of chemical substances that would be hazardous for the consumer and the level of food poisoning bacteria in the food studied is very low. In 2020 the number of food-borne epidemics was significantly lower than in previous years. For the first time the fight against crime in the food chain was incorporated into the national strategy and action plan for combating grey economy and economic crime for 2020–2023. The control activities planned by the food control authorities were mainly achieved. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions and limitations the inspections, sampling and research could be carried out almost as planned. Remote inspections were introduced and controls were made to be more risk-based. The number of food recalls has increased dramatically for both domestic, internal market and third country products. Recalls are an indication of the effectiveness and responsibility of both official controls as well as own-check activities practised by companies.
  • Tulokas, Anu (Helsingfors universitet, 2004)
    The objective of the Finnish Hygiene Act (The Act on Food Hygiene of Foodstuffs of Animal Origin 1195/1996) is to ensure the hygienic quality of foodstuffs of animal origin and prevent the spread of infections from animals to humans via foodstuffs. The Act applies to the handling of foodstuffs of animal origin, hygienic quality requirements, control and inspections prior to retail. It also applies in first destinations to the control and inspections of foodstuffs of animal origin imported to Finland from another member state of the European Union. EU approved establishment, i.e. plant according to the Hygiene Act, is a facility or building where foodstuffs of animal origin are manufactured, stored or handled. The Hygiene Act obliges the plants to draw up and implement an own-check system to help make sure that any shortcomings in terms of the food hygiene are prevented. The own-check system consists of an own-check plan and implementation of the plan. The own-check plan is composed of written own-check programmes and working instructions covering all premises and functions of the plant. The implementation of the own-check plan includes bookkeeping of the implementation. The plant has to make sure that the own-check system is up to date, in accordance with legislation and functional. According to the Hygiene Act, the approval of the plants and their own-check systems as well as management of the control and inspections is assigned to the municipal control authorities with the exception of slaughterhouses and adjacent plants. According to the National Food Agency's instructions municipalities send the control results of each plant on a specific assessment form to the State Provincial Offices at least once a year. In this study the control results of the plants and their own-check systems were analysed. Municipal officials had assessed the level of own-check in EU-approved establishments other than slaughterhouses to be between good and fair in 2002. Assessments had been made in 366 plants (29 %) out of 1267. Assessments from the province of Åland were not included in this study. There were significant differences in the assessments between provincial districts and between certain types of establishments. The differences between districts indicate that the official control of the plants may not have been acceptably uniform thoughout Finland. Own-check had been assessed to be significantly better in dairy plants than in plants handling meat or fish products. In addition, results of this study indicate that EU approved establishments follow their own-check plans, for there were no significant differences in the assessments between the own-check programmes and the corresponding implementations.