Browsing by Subject "forest damage"

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  • Junttila, Samuli; Sugano, Junko; Vastaranta, Mikko; Linnakoski, Riikka; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppa, Hannu; Hyyppa, Juha (2018)
    Changing climate is increasing the amount and intensity of forest stress agents, such as drought, pest insects, and pathogens. Leaf water content, measured here in terms of equivalent water thickness (EWT), is an early indicator of tree stress that provides timely information about the health status of forests. Multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (MS-TLS) measures target geometry and reflectance simultaneously, providing spatially explicit reflectance information at several wavelengths. EWT and leaf internal structure affect leaf reflectance in the shortwave infrared region that can be used to predict EWT with MS-TLS. A second wavelength that is sensitive to leaf internal structure but not affected by EWT can be used to normalize leaf internal effects on the shortwave infrared region and improve the prediction of EWT. Here we investigated the relationship between EWT and laser intensity features using multisensor MS-TLS at 690, 905, and 1,550 nm wavelengths with both drought-treated and Endoconidiophora polonica inoculated Norway spruce seedlings to better understand how MS-TLS measurements can explain variation in EWT. In our study, a normalized ratio of two wavelengths at 905 and 1,550 nm and length of seedling explained 91% of the variation (R-2) in EWT as the respective prediction accuracy for EWT was 0.003 g/cm(2) in greenhouse conditions. The relation between EWT and the normalized ratio of 905 and 1,550 nm wavelengths did not seem sensitive to a decreased point density of the MS-TLS data. Based on our results, different EWTs in Norway spruce seedlings show different spectral responses when measured using MS-TLS. These results can be further used when developing EWT monitoring for improving forest health assessments.
  • Junttila, Samuli; Sugano, Junko; Vastaranta, Mikko; Linnakoski, Riikka; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Holopainen, Markus; Hyyppä, Hannu; Hyyppä, Juha (Frontiers Reseach Foundation, 2018)
    Frontiers in Plant Science
    Changing climate is increasing the amount and intensity of forest stress agents, such as drought, pest insects, and pathogens. Leaf water content, measured here in terms of equivalent water thickness (EWT), is an early indicator of tree stress that provides timely information about the health status of forests. Multispectral terrestrial laser scanning (MS-TLS) measures target geometry and reflectance simultaneously, providing spatially explicit reflectance information at several wavelengths. EWT and leaf internal structure affect leaf reflectance in the shortwave infrared region that can be used to predict EWT with MS-TLS. A second wavelength that is sensitive to leaf internal structure but not affected by EWT can be used to normalize leaf internal effects on the shortwave infrared region and improve the prediction of EWT. Here we investigated the relationship between EWT and laser intensity features using multisensor MS-TLS at 690, 905, and 1,550 nm wavelengths with both drought-treated and Endoconidiophora polonica inoculated Norway spruce seedlings to better understand how MS-TLS measurements can explain variation in EWT. In our study, a normalized ratio of two wavelengths at 905 and 1,550 nm and length of seedling explained 91% of the variation (R2) in EWT as the respective prediction accuracy for EWT was 0.003 g/cm2 in greenhouse conditions. The relation between EWT and the normalized ratio of 905 and 1,550 nm wavelengths did not seem sensitive to a decreased point density of the MS-TLS data. Based on our results, different EWTs in Norway spruce seedlings show different spectral responses when measured using MS-TLS. These results can be further used when developing EWT monitoring for improving forest health assessments.
  • Junttila, Samuli (Helsingin yliopisto, 2014)
    The effect of forest health and structure to the relative surface temperature captured by airborne thermal imagery was investigated in Norway Spruce-dominated stands in Southern Finland. Canopy surface temperature has long been recognized useful in monitoring vegetation water status. Recent studies have shown also its potential in monitoring vegetation health. Airborne thermal imagery, Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and field measurements were acquired from the area of interest (AOI). The relative surface temperature correlated most negatively with the logarithm of stem volume, Lorey’s height and logarithm of basal area at resolution of 254m2 (9-m radius). In other words, taller and older stands had colder surface temperatures. In addition, LiDAR metrics, such as height percentiles and canopy cover percentage, were compared with surface temperature. Standard deviation of canopy height model, height features (H90, CHM_max) and canopy cover percentage were most strongly negatively correlated with the surface temperature. On average, higher surface temperatures were detected in defoliated canopies indicating that thermal images may provide some additional information for classifying forests health status. However, the surface temperature of defoliated plots varied considerably. It was also found that surface temperature differences between canopy and ground responses were higher in defoliated plots. Based on the results, forest health and structure affect to the surface temperature captured by airborne thermal imagery and these effects should be taken into account when developing forest health mapping applications using thermal imagery.
  • Nikula, Ari; Nivala, Vesa; Matala, Juho; Heliövaara, Kari Tapani (2019)
    We modelled the effect of habitat composition and roads on the number and occurrence of moose (Alces alces L.) damage in Ostrobothnia and Lapland using a zero-inflated count model. Models were developed for 1 km(2), 25 km(2) and 100 km(2) landscapes consisting of equilateral rectangular grid cells. Count models predict the number of damage, i.e. the number of plantations and zero models the probability of a landscape being without damage for a given habitat composition. The number of moose damage in neighboring grid cells was a significant predictor in all models. The proportion of mature forest was the most frequent significant variable, and an increasing admixture of mature forests among plantations increased the number and occurrence of damage. The amount of all types of plantations was the second most common significant variable predicting increasing damage along with increasing amount of plantations. An increase in thinning forests as an admixture also increased damage in 1 km(2) landscapes in both areas, whereas an increase in pine-dominated thinning forests in Lapland reduced the number of damage in 25 km(2) landscapes. An increasing amount of inhabited areas in Ostrobothnia and the length of connecting roads in Lapland reduced the number of damage in 1 and 25 km(2) landscapes. Differences in model variables between areas suggest that models of moose damage risk should be adjusted according to characteristics that are specific to the study area.
  • Uimari, Anne; Heliövaara, Kari; Tuba, Katalin; Poteri, Marja; Vuorinen, Martti (2018)
    Several young damaged Norway spruce stands in eastern and central Finland were observed from 2013 to 2016. The damage included trees with heavy resin flow, necrotic foliage, stem and branch cankers and dead trees. Pest identification resulted in the tortricid moth Cydia pactolana whose occurrence was always associated with the presence of the ascomycete pathogen Neonectria fuckeliana. Both the insect and the disease contributed to the extent of the damage, but it is not possible to say in which order they had attacked the trees. Apparently, changed climate has affected the increased occurrence of both the fungus and the moth. However, the characteristics of the insect-fungus interaction and the factors contributing to the coincidences are unknown. Emerging coexistence or potential symbiosis of the two damaging agents is a serious threat for Norway spruce cultivation. Understanding the biology of this fungus-insect interaction is important for controlling them.
  • Lehtonen, Ilari (Finnish Meteorological Institute, 2017)
    Finnish Meteorological Institute Contributions 133
    The aim of this work was to study the climate change impact on two specific abiotic risks affecting forests in Finland: fires and heavy snow loads. Approximately 1000 forest fires occur annually in Finland, but thanks to effective fire suppression, the average size of fires is only about 0.5 ha. Occasionally, heavy snow loading causes forest damage, which reduces stand quality in boreal forests experiencing cold winters. In Finnish forests, snow damage occurs most commonly in the eastern and northern parts of the country. The basic tools used in this work to evaluate the climate change impact were climate models. In addition, observational weather data and fire statistics were used. In evaluating the forest fire risk, the Canadian Fire Weather Index (FWI) system was used. Snow load amounts were estimated mainly by applying a snow load model developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The results indicate that forest fire risk will most likely increase in the future due to increasing temperature and enhanced evaporation. However, there is large uncertainty regarding the rate of change, which originates from the differences between climate model responses to the same radiative forcing. Moreover, an increase in forest fire risk will at the same time increase the risk of onflagrations. Crown snow loads were projected to become heavier in northern Finland and in the regions of Kainuu and North Karelia next to the Russian border. In southern and western Finland the risk of snow damage is expected to decrease. The largest decrease in the risk is projected to occur in coastal areas. In the areas expected to experience increased risk of snow damage, conditions favouring oth heavy wet snow loading and rime accretion were predicted to become more common. The results of this work can be utilized when considering climatically-driven risks in forest management.