Browsing by Subject "galaxies: haloes"

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  • Schewtschenko, J. A.; Baugh, C. M.; Wilkinson, R. J.; Boehm, C.; Pascoli, S.; Sawala, T. (2016)
    In the thermal dark matter (DM) paradigm, primordial interactions between DM and Standard Model particles are responsible for the observed DM relic density. In Boehm et al., we showed that weak-strength interactions between DM and radiation (photons or neutrinos) can erase small-scale density fluctuations, leading to a suppression of the matter power spectrum compared to the collisionless cold DM (CDM) model. This results in fewer DM subhaloes within Milky Way-like DM haloes, implying a reduction in the abundance of satellite galaxies. Here we use very high-resolution N-body simulations to measure the dynamics of these subhaloes. We find that when interactions are included, the largest subhaloes are less concentrated than their counterparts in the collisionless CDM model and have rotation curves that match observational data, providing a new solution to the 'too big to fail' problem.
  • Georgakakis, A.; Comparat, J.; Merloni, A.; Ciesla, L.; Aird, J.; Finoguenov, A. (2019)
    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the distribution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the cosmicweb. It populates dark-matter haloes in N-body simulations (MultiDark) with galaxy stellar masses using empirical relations based on abundance matching techniques, and then paints accretion events on these galaxies using state-of-the-art measurements of the AGN occupation of galaxies. The explicit assumption is that the large-scale distribution of AGN is independent of the physics of black hole fuelling. The model is shown to be consistent with current measurements of the two-point correlation function of AGN samples. It is then used to make inferences on the halo occupation of the AGN population. Mock AGNs are found in haloes with a broad distribution of masses with a mode of approximate to 10(12) h(-1) M-circle dot and a tail extending to cluster-size haloes. The clustering properties of the model AGN depend only weakly on accretion luminosity and redshift. The fraction of satellite AGN in the model increases steeply toward more massive haloes, in contrast with some recent observational results. This discrepancy, if confirmed, could point to a dependence of the halo occupation of AGN on the physics of black hole fuelling.
  • Oman, Kyle A.; Navarro, Julio F.; Sales, Laura V.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; White, Simon D. M. (2016)
    We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of the APOSTLE project along with high-quality rotation curve observations to examine the fraction of baryons in I > CDM haloes that collect into galaxies. This 'galaxy formation efficiency' correlates strongly and with little scatter with halo mass, dropping steadily towards dwarf galaxies. The baryonic mass of a galaxy may thus be used to place a lower limit on total halo mass and, consequently, on its asymptotic maximum circular velocity. A number of observed dwarfs seem to violate this constraint, having baryonic masses up to 10 times higher than expected from their rotation speeds, or, alternatively, rotating at only half the speed expected for their mass. Taking the data at face value, either these systems have formed galaxies with extraordinary efficiency - highly unlikely given their shallow potential wells - or their dark matter content is much lower than expected from I > CDM haloes. This 'missing dark matter' is reminiscent of the inner mass deficit of galaxies with slowly rising rotation curves, but cannot be explained away by star formation-induced 'cores' in the dark mass profile, since the anomalous deficit applies to regions larger than the luminous galaxies themselves. We argue that explaining the structure of these galaxies would require either substantial modification of the standard I > CDM paradigm or else significant revision to the uncertainties in their inferred mass profiles, which should be much larger than reported. Systematic errors in inclination may provide a simple resolution to what would otherwise be a rather intractable problem for the current paradigm.
  • Cautun, Marius; Deason, Alis J.; Frenk, Carlos S.; McAlpine, Stuart (2019)
    The Milky Way (MW) offers a uniquely detailed view of galactic structure and is often regarded as a prototypical spiral galaxy. But recent observations indicate that the MW is atypical: it has an undersized supermassive black hole at its centre; it is surrounded by a very low mass, excessively metal-poor stellar halo; and it has an unusually large nearby satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Here, we show that the LMC is on a collision course with the MW with which it will merge in 2.4(-0.8)(+1.2) Gyr (68 per cent confidence level). This catastrophic and long-overdue event will restore the MW to normality. Using the EAGLE galaxy formation simulation, we show that, as a result of the merger, the central supermassive black hole will increase in mass by up to a factor of 8. The Galactic stellar halo will undergo an equally impressive transformation, becoming 5 times more massive. The additional stars will come predominantly from the disrupted LMC, but a sizeable number will be ejected on to the halo from the stellar disc. The post-merger stellar halo will have the median metallicity of the LMC, [Fe/H] = -0.5 dex, which is typical of other galaxies of similar mass to the MW. At the end of this exceptional event, the MW will become a true benchmark for spiral galaxies, at least temporarily.
  • Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S.; Oman, Kyle A.; Crain, Robert A.; Furlong, Michelle; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Jenkins, Adrian (2016)
    We use a large sample of isolated dark matter halo pairs drawn from cosmological N-body simulations to identify candidate systems whose kinematics match that of the Local Group (LG) of galaxies. We find, in agreement with the 'timing argument' and earlier work, that the separation and approach velocity of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) galaxies favour a total mass for the pair of similar to 5 x 10(12) M-circle dot. A mass this large, however, is difficult to reconcile with the small relative tangential velocity of the pair, as well as with the small deceleration from the Hubble flow observed for the most distant LG members. Halo pairs that match these three criteria have average masses a factor of similar to 2 times smaller than suggested by the timing argument, but with large dispersion. Guided by these results, we have selected 12 halo pairs with total mass in the range 1.6-3.6 x 10(12) M-circle dot for the APOSTLE project (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment), a suite of hydrodynamical resimulations at various numerical resolution levels (reaching up to similar to 10(4) M-circle dot per gas particle) that use the subgrid physics developed for the EAGLE project. These simulations reproduce, by construction, the main kinematics of the MW-M31 pair, and produce satellite populations whose overall number, luminosities, and kinematics are in good agreement with observations of the MW and M31 companions. The APOSTLE candidate systems thus provide an excellent testbed to confront directly many of the predictions of the Lambda cold dark matter cosmology with observations of our local Universe.
  • Davies, Jonathan J.; Crain, Robert A.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaye, Joop; Schaller, Matthieu; McAlpine, Stuart (2019)
    We examine the origin of scatter in the relationship between the gas fraction and mass of dark matter haloes hosting present-day similar to L-star central galaxies in the EAGLE simulations. The scatter is uncorrelated with the accretion rate of the central galaxy's black hole (BH), but correlates strongly and negatively with the BH's mass, implicating differences in the expulsion of gas by active galactic nucleus feedback, throughout the assembly of the halo, as the main cause of scatter. Haloes whose central galaxies host undermassive BHs also tend to retain a higher gas fraction, and exhibit elevated star formation rates (SFRs). Diversity in the mass of central BHs stems primarily from diversity in the dark matter halo binding energy, as these quantities are strongly and positively correlated at fixed halo mass, such that similar to L-star galaxies hosted by haloes that are more (less) tightly bound develop central BHs that are more (less) massive than is typical for their halo mass. Variations in the halo gas fraction at fixed halo mass are reflected in both the soft X-ray luminosity and thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, suggesting that the prediction of a strong coupling between the properties of galaxies and their halo gas fractions can be tested with measurements of these diagnostics for galaxies with diverse SFRs but similar halo masses.
  • Reeves, Andrew M. M.; Balogh, Michael L.; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kukstas, Egidijus; McCarthy, Ian G.; Webb, Kristi; Muzzin, Adam; McGee, Sean; Rudnick, Gregory; Biviano, Andrea; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey C. C.; Cooper, M. C.; Demarco, Ricardo; Jablonka, Pascale; De Lucia, Gabriella; Vulcani, Benedetta; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Zaritsky, Dennis (2021)
    We use photometric redshifts and statistical background subtraction to measure stellar mass functions in galaxy group-mass (4.5-8 x 10(13) M-circle dot) haloes at 1 < z < 1.5. Groups are selected from COSMOS and SXDF, based on X-ray imaging and sparse spectroscopy. Stellar mass (M-stell(ar)) functions are computed for quiescent and star-forming galaxies separately, based on their rest-frame UVJ colours. From these we compute the quiescent fraction and quiescent fraction excess (QFE) relative to the field as a function of M-stel(lar). QFE increases with M-st(ellar), similar to more massive clusters at 1 < z < 1.5. This contrasts with the apparent separability of M-stellar, and environmental factors on galaxy quiescent fractions at z similar to 0. We then compare our results with higher mass clusters at 1 < z < 1.5 and lower redshifts. We find a strong QFE dependence on halo mass at fixed M-ste(ll)ar; well fit by a logarithmic slope of d(QFE)/dlog (M-halo) similar to 0.24 +/- 0.04 for all M-stellar and redshift bins. This dependence is in remarkably good qualitative agreement with the hydrodynamic simulation BAHAMAS, but contradicts the observed dependence of QFE on M-stellar. We interpret the results using two toy models: one where a time delay until rapid (instantaneous) quenching begins upon accretion to the main progenitor ( 'no pre-processing') and one where it starts upon first becoming a satellite ('pre-processing'). Delay times appear to be halo mass-dependent, with a significantly stronger dependence required without pre-processing. We conclude that our results support models in which environmental quenching begins in low-mass ( 1.
  • Sales, Laura V.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle; Fattahi, Azadeh; Ferrero, Ismael; Abadi, Mario; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; White, Simon D. M. (2017)
    The scaling of disc galaxy rotation velocity with baryonic mass (the 'baryonic Tully-Fisher' relation, BTF) has long confounded galaxy formation models. It is steeper than the M proportional to V-3 scaling relating halo virial masses and circular velocities and its zero-point implies that galaxies comprise a very small fraction of available baryons. Such low galaxy formation efficiencies may, in principle, be explained by winds driven by evolving stars, but the tightness of the BTF relation argues against the substantial scatter expected from such a vigorous feedback mechanism. We use the APOSTLE/EAGLE simulations to show that the BTF relation is well reproduced in Lambda cold dark matter (CDM) simulations that match the size and number of galaxies as a function of stellar mass. In such models, galaxy rotation velocities are proportional to halo virial velocity and the steep velocity-mass dependence results from the decline in galaxy formation efficiency with decreasing halo mass needed to reconcile the CDM halo mass function with the galaxy luminosity function. The scatter in the simulated BTF is smaller than observed, even when considering all simulated galaxies and not just rotationally supported ones. The simulations predict that the BTF should become increasingly steep at the faint end, although the velocity scatter at fixed mass should remain small. Observed galaxies with rotation speeds below similar to 40 km s(-1) seem to deviate from this prediction. We discuss observational biases and modelling uncertainties that may help to explain this disagreement in the context of Lambda CDM models of dwarf galaxy formation.
  • Benitez-Llambay, Alejandro; Navarro, Julio F.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Oman, Kyle; Fattahi, Azadeh; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Crain, Robert A.; Theuns, Tom (2017)
    We examine the baryon content of low-mass A cold dark matter (ACDM) haloes (10(8) <M-200/M-circle dot <5 x 10(9)) using the APOSTLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Most of these systems are free of stars and have a gaseous content set by the combined effects of cosmic reionization, which imposes a mass-dependent upper limit, and of ram-pressure stripping, which reduces it further in high-density regions. Haloes mainly affected by reionization (RELHICS; REionization-Limited H I Clouds) inhabit preferentially low-density regions and make up a population where the gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium with the dark matter potential and in thermal equilibrium with the ionizing UV background. Their thermodynamic properties are well specified, and their gas density and temperature profiles may be predicted in detail. Gas in RELHICs is nearly fully ionized but with neutral cores that span a large range of HI masses and column densities and have negligible non-thermal broadening. We present predictions for their characteristic sizes and central column densities; the massive tail of the distribution should be within reach of future blind HI surveys. Local Group RELHICs (LGRs) have some properties consistent with observed Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) but the sheer number of the latter suggests that most UCHVCs are not RELHICS. Our results suggest that LGRs (i) should typically be beyond 500 kpc from the Milky Way or M31; (ii) have positive Galactocentric radial velocities; (iii) H I sizes not exceeding 1 kpc, and (iv) should be nearly round. The detection and characterization of RELHICS would offer a unique probe of the small-scale clustering of CDM.
  • Viitanen, A.; Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A.; Shankar, F.; Marsden, C. (2021)
    The co-evolution between central supermassive black holes (BHs), their host galaxies, and dark matter haloes is still a matter of intense debate. Present theoretical models suffer from large uncertainties and degeneracies, for example, between the fraction of accreting sources and their characteristic accretion rate. In recent work, we showed that active galactic nuclei (AGNs) clustering represents a powerful tool to break degeneracies when analysed in terms of mean BH mass, and that AGN bias at fixed stellar mass is largely independent of most of the input parameters, such as the AGN duty cycle and the mean scaling between BH mass and host galaxy stellar mass. In this paper, we take advantage of our improved semi-empirical methodology and recent clustering data derived from large AGN samples at z similar to 1.2, demonstrate that the AGN bias as a function of host galaxy stellar mass is a crucial diagnostic of the BH-galaxy connection, and is highly dependent on the scatter around the BH mass-galaxy mass scaling relation and on the relative fraction of satellite and central active BHs. Current data at z similar to 1.2 favour relatively high values of AGN in satellites, pointing to a major role of disc instabilities in triggering AGN, unless a high minimum host halo mass is assumed. The data are not decisive on the magnitude/covariance of the BH-galaxy scatter at z similar to 1.2 and intermediate host masses M-star less than or similar to 10(11) M-star. However, future surveys like Euclid/LSST will be pivotal in shedding light on the BH-galaxy co-evolution.