Browsing by Subject "genetic predisposition"

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  • Rinne, Sanni J.; Sipilä, Lauri J.; Sulo, Päivi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Beziat, Vivien; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Parvaneh, Nima; Balighi, Kamran; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Sarid, Ronit; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Aavikko, Mervi (2019)
    Familial clustering of classic Kaposi sarcoma (CKS) is rare with, approximately 100 families reported to date. We studied 2 consanguineous families, 1 Iranian and 1 Israeli, with multiple cases of adult CKS and without overt underlying immunodeficiency. We performed genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-genome sequencing to discover the putative genetic cause for predisposition. A 9-kb homozygous intronic deletion in RP11-259O2.1 in the Iranian family and 2 homozygous variants, 1 in SCUBE2 and the other in CDHR5, in the Israeli family were identified as possible candidates. The presented variants provide a robust starting point for validation in independent samples.
  • Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, P.; Dennis, J.; Domchek, S.M.; Robson, M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Ramus, S.J.; Mavaddat, N.; Terry, M.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Offit, K.; Couch, F.J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Healey, S.; Lush, M.; Hamann, U.; Southey, M.; John, E.M.; Chung, W.K.; Daly, M. B.; Buys, S.S.; Goldgar, D.E.; Dorfling, C.M.; van Rensburg, E.J.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Hansen, T.V.O.; Slager, S.; Hallberg, E.; Benitez, J.; Osorio, A.; Cohen, N.; Lawler, W.; Weitzel, J.N.; Peterlongo, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Barile, M.; Aittomäki, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Rantala, J. (2017)
    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]-positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2 × 10-53). InBRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BCPRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2 × 10-20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. © The Author 2017.
  • Santos-Cortez, R.L.P.; Bhutta, M.F.; Earl, J.P.; Hafrén, Lena; Jennings, M.; Mell, J.C.; Pichichero, M.E.; Ryan, A.F.; Tateossian, Hilda; Ehrlich, G.D. (2020)
    Objective: To review the most recent advances in human and bacterial genomics as applied to pathogenesis and clinical management of otitis media. Data sources: PubMed articles published since the last meeting in June 2015 up to June 2019. Review methods: A panel of experts in human and bacterial genomics of otitis media was formed. Each panel member reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a merged draft was created. The panel met at the 20th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2019, discussed the review and refined the content. A final draft was made, circulated, and approved by the panel members. Conclusion: Trans-disciplinary approaches applying pan-omic technologies to identify human susceptibility to otitis media and to understand microbial population dynamics, patho-adaptation and virulence mechanisms are crucial to the development of novel, personalized therapeutics and prevention strategies for otitis media. Implications for practice: In the future otitis media prevention strategies may be augmented by mucosal immunization, combination vaccines targeting multiple pathogens, and modulation of the middle ear microbiome. Both treatment and vaccination may be tailored to an individual's otitis media phenotype as defined by molecular profiles obtained by using rapidly developing techniques in microbial and host genomics. © 2020 Elsevier B.V.
  • Waldenström macroglobulinemia Group (2018)
    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM)/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) is a rare, chronic B-cell lymphoma with high heritability. We conduct a two-stage genome-wide association study of WM/LPL in 530 unrelated cases and 4362 controls of European ancestry and identify two high-risk loci associated with WM/LPL at 6p25.3 (rs116446171, near EXOC2 and IRF4; OR = 21.14, 95% CI: 14.40–31.03, P = 1.36 × 10 −54 ) and 14q32.13 (rs117410836, near TCL1; OR = 4.90, 95% CI: 3.45–6.96, P = 8.75 × 10 −19 ). Both risk alleles are observed at a low frequency among controls (~2–3%) and occur in excess in affected cases within families. In silico data suggest that rs116446171 may have functional importance, and in functional studies, we demonstrate increased reporter transcription and proliferation in cells transduced with the 6p25.3 risk allele. Although further studies are needed to fully elucidate underlying biological mechanisms, together these loci explain 4% of the familial risk and provide insights into genetic susceptibility to this malignancy. © 2018, The Author(s).