Browsing by Subject "genome-wide association study"

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  • Surrogate Markers Micro-Macro-Vasc (2018)
    Purpose Diabetic retinopathy is the most common eye complication in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic factors contributing to severe diabetic retinopathy. Methods Results A genome-wide association approach was applied. In the Genetics of Diabetes Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland (GoDARTS) datasets, cases of severe diabetic retinopathy were defined as type 2 diabetic patients who were ever graded as having severe background retinopathy (Level R3) or proliferative retinopathy (Level R4) in at least one eye according to the Scottish Diabetic Retinopathy Grading Scheme or who were once treated by laser photocoagulation. Controls were diabetic individuals whose longitudinal retinopathy screening records were either normal (Level R0) or only with mild background retinopathy (Level R1) in both eyes. Significant Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) were taken forward for meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts. Five hundred and sixty cases of type 2 diabetes with severe diabetic retinopathy and 4,106 controls were identified in the GoDARTS cohort. We revealed that rs3913535 in the NADPH Oxidase 4 (NOX4) gene reached a p value of 4.05 x 10(-9). Two nearby SNPs, rs10765219 and rs11018670 also showed promising p values (p values = 7.41 x 10(-8) and 1.23 x 10(-8), respectively). In the meta-analysis using multiple Caucasian cohorts (excluding GoDARTS), rs10765219 and rs11018670 showed associations for diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.003 and 0.007, respectively), while the p value of rs3913535 was not significant (p = 0.429). Conclusion This genome-wide association study of severe diabetic retinopathy suggests new evidence for the involvement of the NOX4 gene.
  • Sulkava, Sonja; Ollila, Hanna M.; Alasaari, Jukka; Puttonen, Sampsa; Harma, Mikko; Viitasalo, Katriina; Lahtinen, Alexandra; Lindstrom, Jaana; Toivola, Auli; Sulkava, Raimo; Kivimaki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Partonen, Timo; Silander, Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Paunio, Tiina (2017)
    Study Objectives: Tolerance to shift work varies; only some shift workers suffer from disturbed sleep, fatigue, and job-related exhaustion. Our aim was to explore molecular genetic risk factors for intolerance to shift work. Methods: We assessed intolerance to shift work with job-related exhaustion symptoms in shift workers using the emotional exhaustion subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Illumina's Human610-Quad BeadChip (n = 176). The most significant findings were further studied in three groups of Finnish shift workers (n = 577). We assessed methylation in blood cells with the Illumina HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, and examined gene expression levels in the publicly available eGWAS Mayo data. Results: The second strongest signal identified in the GWAS (p = 2.3 x 10E-6) was replicated in two of the replication studies with p Conclusions: These findings suggest that a variant near MTNR1A may be associated with job-related exhaustion in shift workers. The risk variant may exert its effect via epigenetic mechanisms, potentially leading to reduced melatonin signaling in the brain. These results could indicate a link between melatonin signaling, a key circadian regulatory mechanism, and tolerance to shift work.
  • Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, P.; Dennis, J.; Domchek, S.M.; Robson, M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Ramus, S.J.; Mavaddat, N.; Terry, M.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Offit, K.; Couch, F.J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Healey, S.; Lush, M.; Hamann, U.; Southey, M.; John, E.M.; Chung, W.K.; Daly, M. B.; Buys, S.S.; Goldgar, D.E.; Dorfling, C.M.; van Rensburg, E.J.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Hansen, T.V.O.; Slager, S.; Hallberg, E.; Benitez, J.; Osorio, A.; Cohen, N.; Lawler, W.; Weitzel, J.N.; Peterlongo, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Barile, M.; Aittomäki, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Rantala, J. (2017)
    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]-positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2 × 10-53). InBRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BCPRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2 × 10-20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. © The Author 2017.
  • Ahlström, Sirkku; Bergman, Paula; Jokela, Ritva; Ottensmann, Linda; Ahola-Olli, Ari; Pirinen, Matti; Olkkola, Klaus T.; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Kalso, Eija (2021)
    Background: Rocuronium, a common neuromuscular blocking agent, is mainly excreted unchanged in urine (10-25%) and bile ( 70%). Age, sex, liver blood flow, smoking, medical conditions, and ethnic background can affect its pharmacological actions. However, reasons for the wide variation in rocuronium requirements are mostly unknown. We hypothesised that pharmacogenetic factors might explain part of the variation. Methods: One thousand women undergoing surgery for breast cancer were studied. Anaesthesia was maintained with propofol (50-100 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) and remifentanil (0.05-0.25 mg kg(-1) min(-1)). Neuromuscular block was maintained with rocuronium to keep the train-of-four ratio at 0-10%. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and genotyped with a next-generation genotyping array. The genome-wide association study (GWAS) was conducted using an additive linear regression model with PLINK software. The FINEMAP tool and data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project v8 were utilised to study the locus further. Results: The final patient population comprised 918 individuals. Of the clinical variables tested, age, BMI, ASA physical status, and total dose of propofol correlated significantly (all P Conclusions: Genetic variation in the gene SLCO1A2, encoding OATP1A2, an uptake transporter, accounted for 4% of the variability in rocuronium consumption. The underlying mechanism remains unknown.
  • Jia, Qiong; Han, Yi; Huang, Pin; Woodward, Nicholas C.; Gukasyan, Janet; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Anufrieva, Olga; Wang, Qin; Perola, Markus; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimaki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Boehnke, Michael; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L.; Fiehn, Oliver; Wang, Zeneng; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hartiala, Jaana A.; Allayee, Hooman (2019)
    Background-Recent studies have revealed sexually dimorphic associations between the carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 locus, intermediates of the metabolic pathway leading from choline to urea, and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in women. Based on evidence from the literature, the atheroprotective association with carbamoyl-phosphate synthase 1 could be mediated by the strong genetic effect of this locus on increased circulating glycine levels. Methods and Results-We sought to identify additional genetic determinants of circulating glycine levels by carrying out a metaanalysis of genome-wide association study data in up to 30 118 subjects of European ancestry. Mendelian randomization and other analytical approaches were used to determine whether glycine-associated variants were associated with CAD and traditional risk factors. Twelve loci were significantly associated with circulating glycine levels, 7 of which were not previously known to be involved in glycine metabolism (ACADM, PHGDH, COX1 8-ADAMTS3, PSPH, TRIB 1 , PTPRD, and ABO). Glycine-raising alleles at several loci individually exhibited directionally consistent associations with decreased risk of CAD. However, these effects could not be attributed directly to glycine because of associations with other CAD-related traits. By comparison, genetic models that only included the 2 variants directly involved in glycine degradation and for which there were no other pleiotropic associations were not associated with risk of CAD or blood pressure, lipid levels, and obesity-related traits. Conclusions-These results provide additional insight into the genetic architecture of glycine metabolism, but do not yield conclusive evidence for a causal relationship between circulating levels of this amino acid and risk of CAD in humans.
  • SUMMIT Steering Comm; CARDIOGRAMplusC4D Steering Comm; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Ladenvall, Claes; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Salomaa, Veikko; Groop, Leif; Ripatti, Samuli (2020)
    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is accelerated in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). METHODS: To test whether this reflects differential genetic influences on CAD risk in subjects with T2D, we performed a systematic assessment of genetic overlap between CAD and T2D in 66 643 subjects (27 708 with CAD and 24 259 with T2D). Variants showing apparent association with CAD in stratified analyses or evidence of interaction were evaluated in a further 117 787 subjects (16 694 with CAD and 11 537 with T2D). RESULTS: None of the previously characterized CAD loci was found to have specific effects on CAD in T2D individuals, and a genome-wide interaction analysis found no new variants for CAD that could be considered T2D specific. When we considered the overall genetic correlations between CAD and its risk factors, we found no substantial differences in these relationships by T2D background. CONCLUSIONS: This study found no evidence that the genetic architecture of CAD differs in those with T2D compared with those without T2D.
  • FinnGen; Leskelä, Jaakko; Toppila, Iiro; Härmä, Mari-Anne; Palviainen, Teemu; Salminen, Aino; Sandholm, Niina; Pietiäinen, Milla; Kopra, Elisa; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Kumar, Anmol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Roslund, Kajsa; Forsblom, Carol; Loukola, Anu; Havulinna, Aki S.; Lagrost, Laurent; Salomaa, Veikko; Groop, Per-Henrik; Perola, Markus; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lehto, Markku; Pussinen, Pirkko J. (2021)
    Background Translocation of lipopolysaccharide from gram-negative bacteria into the systemic circulation results in endotoxemia. In addition to acute infections, endotoxemia is detected in cardiometabolic disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases and obesity. Methods and Results We performed a genome-wide association study of serum lipopolysaccharide activity in 11 296 individuals from 6 different Finnish study cohorts. Endotoxemia was measured by limulus amebocyte lysate assay in the whole population and by 2 other techniques (Endolisa and high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry) in subpopulations. The associations of the composed genetic risk score of endotoxemia and thrombosis-related clinical end points for 195 170 participants were analyzed in FinnGen. Lipopolysaccharide activity had a genome-wide significant association with 741 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 5 independent loci, which were mainly located at genes affecting the contact activation of the coagulation cascade and lipoprotein metabolism and explained 1.5% to 9.2% of the variability in lipopolysaccharide activity levels. The closest genes included KNG1, KLKB1, F12, SLC34A1, YPEL4, CLP1, ZDHHC5, SERPING1, CBX5, and LIPC. The genetic risk score of endotoxemia was associated with deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary heart disease, and venous thromboembolism. Conclusions The biological activity of lipopolysaccharide in the circulation (ie, endotoxemia) has a small but highly significant genetic component. Endotoxemia is associated with genetic variation in the contact activation pathway, vasoactivity, and lipoprotein metabolism, which play important roles in host defense, lipopolysaccharide neutralization, and thrombosis, and thereby thromboembolism and stroke.
  • Mateos, Marion K.; Tulstrup, Morten; Quinn, Michael C. J.; Tuckuviene, Ruta; Marshall, Glenn M.; Gupta, Ramneek; Mayoh, Chelsea; Wolthers, Benjamin O.; Barbaro, Pasquale M.; Ruud, Ellen; Sutton, Rosemary; Huttunen, Pasi; Revesz, Tamas; Trakymiene, Sonata S.; Barbaric, Draga; Tedgard, Ulf; Giles, Jodie E.; Alvaro, Frank; Jonsson, Olafur G.; Mechinaud, Francoise; Saks, Kadri; Catchpoole, Daniel; Kotecha, Rishi S.; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Trahair, Toby N.; MacGregor, Stuart; Schmiegelow, Kjeld (2020)
    Symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs in five percent of children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but whether a genetic predisposition exists across different ALL treatment regimens has not been well studied. Methods: We undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis for VTE in consecutively treated children in the Nordic/Baltic acute lymphoblastic leukemia 2008 (ALL2008) cohort and the Australian Evaluation of Risk of ALL Treatment-Related Side-Effects (ERASE) cohort. A total of 92 cases and 1481 controls of European ancestry were included. Results: No SNPs reached genome-wide significance (p <5 x 10(-8)) in either cohort. Among the top 34 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (p <1 x 10(-6)), two loci had concordant effects in both cohorts: ALOX15B (rs1804772) (MAF: 1%; p = 3.95 x 10(-7)) that influences arachidonic acid metabolism and thus platelet aggregation, and KALRN (rs570684) (MAF: 1%; p = 4.34 x 10(-7)) that has been previously associated with risk of ischemic stroke, atherosclerosis, and early-onset coronary artery disease. Conclusion: This represents the largest GWAS meta-analysis conducted to date associating SNPs to VTE in children and adolescents treated on childhood ALL protocols. Validation of these findings is needed and may then lead to patient stratification for VTE preventive interventions. As VTE hemostasis involves multiple pathways, a more powerful GWAS is needed to detect combination of variants associated with VTE.
  • Tanskanen, Tomas; van den Berg, Linda; Valimaki, Niko; Aavikko, Mervi; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Wettergren, Yvonne; Lindskog, Elinor Bexe; Tonisson, Neeme; Metspalu, Andres; Silander, Kaisa; Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J.; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra E.; Hanninen, Ulrika A.; Cajuso, Tatiana; Kondelin, Johanna; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Jarvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepisto, Anna; Bohm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Tim S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Win, Aung K.; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark A.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Casey, Graham; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Houlston, Richard S.; Palin, Kimmo; Aaltonen, Lauri A. (2018)
    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in elucidating the genetic basis of colorectal cancer (CRC), but there remains unexplained variability in genetic risk. To identify new risk variants and to confirm reported associations, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 1,701 CRC cases and 14,082 cancer-free controls from the Finnish population. A total of 9,068,015 genetic variants were imputed and tested, and 30 promising variants were studied in additional 11,647 cases and 12,356 controls of European ancestry. The previously reported association between the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs992157 (2q35) and CRC was independently replicated (p=2.08 x 10(-4); OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23), and it was genome-wide significant in combined analysis (p=1.50 x 10(-9); OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16). Variants at 2q35, 6p21.2, 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10q22.3, 10q24.2, 11q13.4, 11q23.1, 14q22.2, 15q13.3, 18q21.1, 20p12.3 and 20q13.33 were associated with CRC in the Finnish population (false discovery rate
  • Salo, Perttu P.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Tukiainen, Taru; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Männikkö, Minna; Eriksson, Johan G.; Jula, Antti; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Salomaa, Veikko; Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus (2017)
    Background Cardiomyocytes secrete atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in response to mechanical stretching, making them useful clinical biomarkers of cardiac stress. Both human and animal studies indicate a role for ANP as a regulator of blood pressure with conflicting results for BNP. Methods and Results We used genome-wide association analysis (n=6296) to study the effects of genetic variants on circulating natriuretic peptide concentrations and compared the impact of natriuretic peptide-associated genetic variants on blood pressure (n=27059). Eight independent genetic variants in 2 known (NPPA-NPPB and POC1B-GALNT4) and 1 novel locus (PPP3CC) associated with midregional proANP (MR-proANP), BNP, aminoterminal proBNP (NT-proBNP), or BNP:NT-proBNP ratio. The NPPA-NPPB locus containing the adjacent genes encoding ANP and BNP harbored 4 independent cis variants with effects specific to either midregional proANP or BNP and a rare missense single nucleotide polymorphism in NT-proBNP seriously altering its measurement. Variants near the calcineurin catalytic subunit gamma gene PPP3CC and the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 4 gene GALNT4 associated with BNP:NT-proBNP ratio but not with BNP or midregional proANP, suggesting effects on the post-translational regulation of proBNP. Out of the 8 individual variants, only those correlated with midregional proANP had a statistically significant albeit weak impact on blood pressure. The combined effect of these 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms also associated with hypertension risk (P=8.2x10(-4)). Conclusions Common genetic differences affecting the circulating concentration of ANP associated with blood pressure, whereas those affecting BNP did not, highlighting the blood pressure-lowering effect of ANP in the general population.
  • GoLEAD Consortium; SUMMIT Consortium; van Zuydam, Natalie R.; Stiby, Alexander; Abdalla, Moustafa; Dahlström, Emma H.; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Sandholm, Niina; Forsblom, Carol; Sinisalo, Juha; Perola, Markus; Kallio, Milla; Groop, Per-Henrik; Groop, Leif; Kullo, Iftikhar J. (2021)
    Background: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects >200 million people worldwide and is associated with high mortality and morbidity. We sought to identify genomic variants associated with PAD overall and in the contexts of diabetes and smoking status. Methods: We identified genetic variants associated with PAD and then meta-analyzed with published summary statistics from the Million Veterans Program and UK Biobank to replicate their findings. Next, we ran stratified genome-wide association analysis in ever smokers, never smokers, individuals with diabetes, and individuals with no history of diabetes and corresponding interaction analyses, to identify variants that modify the risk of PAD by diabetic or smoking status. Results: We identified 5 genome-wide significant (P-association
  • He, Liang; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Heikkila, Kauko; Chou, Yi-Ling; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Korhonen, Tellervo; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ripatti, Samuli; Kaprio, Jaakko; Loukola, Anu (2016)
    Background: Various pivotal stages in smoking behavior can be identified, including initiation, conversion from experimenting to established use, development of tolerance, and cessation. Previous studies have shown high heritability for age of smoking initiation and cessation; however, time-to-event genome-wide association studies aiming to identify underpinning genes that accelerate or delay these transitions are missing to date. Methods: We investigated which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the whole genome contribute to the hazard ratio of transition between different stages of smoking behavior by performing time-to-event analyses within a large Finnish twin family cohort (N = 1962), and further conducted mediation analyses of plausible intermediate traits for significant SNPs. Results: Genome-wide significant signals were detected for three of the four transitions: (1) for smoking cessation on 10p14 (P = 4.47e-08 for rs72779075 flanked by RP11-575N15 and GATA3), (2) for tolerance on 11p13 (P = 1.29e-08 for rs11031684 in RP1-65P5.1), mediated by smoking quantity, and on 9q34.12 (P = 3.81e-08 for rs2304808 in FUBP3), independent of smoking quantity, and (3) for smoking initiation on 19q13.33 (P = 3.37e-08 for rs73050610 flanked by TRPM4 and SLC6A16) in analysis adjusted for first time sensations. Although our top SNPs did not replicate, another SNP in the TRPM4-SLC6A16 gene region showed statistically significant association after region-based multiple testing correction in an independent Australian twin family sample. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the functional effect of the TRPM4-SLC6A16 gene region deserves further investigation, and that complex neurotransmitter networks including dopamine and glutamate may play a critical role in smoking initiation. Moreover, comparison of these results implies that genetic contributions to the complex smoking behavioral phenotypes vary among the transitions.
  • eQTLGen Consortium (2018)
    Understanding the difference in genetic regulation of gene expression between brain and blood is important for discovering genes for brain-related traits and disorders. Here, we estimate the correlation of genetic effects at the top-associated cis-expression or -DNA methylation (DNAm) quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs or cis-mQTLs) between brain and blood (r b ). Using publicly available data, we find that genetic effects at the top cis-eQTLs or mQTLs are highly correlated between independent brain and blood samples (r b = 0.70 for cis-eQTLs and r ^ b = 0.78 for cis-mQTLs). Using meta-analyzed brain cis-eQTL/mQTL data (n = 526 to 1194), we identify 61 genes and 167 DNAm sites associated with four brain-related phenotypes, most of which are a subset of the discoveries (97 genes and 295 DNAm sites) using data from blood with larger sample sizes (n = 1980 to 14,115). Our results demonstrate the gain of power in gene discovery for brain-related phenotypes using blood cis-eQTL/mQTL data with large sample sizes. © 2018 The Author(s).
  • Saleheen, Danish; Zhao, Wei; Young, Robin; Nelson, Christopher P.; Ho, WeangKee; Ferguson, Jane F.; Rasheed, Asif; Ou, Kristy; Nurnberg, Sylvia T.; Bauer, Robert C.; Goel, Anuj; Do, Ron; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Hartiala, Jaana; Zhang, Weihua; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Sinisalo, Juha; Kanoni, Stavroula; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Marouli, Eirini; Kristiansson, Kati; Zhao, Jing Hua; Scott, Robert; Gauguier, Dominique; Shah, Svati H.; Smith, Albert Vernon; van Zuydam, Natalie; Cox, Amanda J.; Willenborg, Christina; Kessler, Thorsten; Zeng, Lingyao; Province, Michael A.; Ganna, Andrea; Lind, Lars; Pedersen, Nancy L.; White, Charles C.; Joensuu, Anni; Kleber, Marcus Edi; Hall, Alistair S.; Maerz, Winfried; Salomaa, Veikko; O'Donnell, Christopher; Ingelsson, Erik; Feitosa, Mary F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bowden, Donald W.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Perola, Markus; PROMIS; Cardiogramplusc4D (2017)
    BACKGROUND: Common diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD) are complex in etiology. The interaction of genetic susceptibility with lifestyle factors may play a prominent role. However, gene-lifestyle interactions for CHD have been difficult to identify. Here, we investigate interaction of smoking behavior, a potent lifestyle factor, with genotypes that have been shown to associate with CHD risk. METHODS: We analyzed data on 60 919 CHD cases and 80 243 controls from 29 studies for gene-smoking interactions for genetic variants at 45 loci previously reported to be associated with CHD risk. We also studied 5 loci associated with smoking behavior. Study-specific gene-smoking interaction effects were calculated and pooled using fixed-effects meta-analyses. Interaction analyses were declared to be significant at a P value of <1.0x10(-3) (Bonferroni correction for 50 tests). RESULTS: We identified novel gene-smoking interaction for a variant upstream of the ADAMTS7 gene. Every T allele of rs7178051 was associated with lower CHD risk by 12% in never-smokers (P= 1.3x10(-16)) in comparison with 5% in ever-smokers (P= 2.5x10(-4)), translating to a 60% loss of CHD protection conferred by this allelic variation in people who smoked tobacco (interaction P value= 8.7x10(-5)). The protective T allele at rs7178051 was also associated with reduced ADAMTS7 expression in human aortic endothelial cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Exposure of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells to cigarette smoke extract led to induction of ADAMTS7. CONCLUSIONS: Allelic variation at rs7178051 that associates with reduced ADAMTS7 expression confers stronger CHD protection in never-smokers than in ever-smokers. Increased vascular ADAMTS7 expression may contribute to the loss of CHD protection in smokers.