Browsing by Subject "habits"

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  • Gronow, Antti (Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, 2012)
    COLLeGIUM: Studies across Disciplines in the Humanities and Social Sciences 12
  • Huttunen-Lenz, Maija; Hansen, Sylvia; Christensen, Pia; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Sando-Pedersen, Finn; Drummen, Mathijs; Adam, Tanja C.; Macdonald, Ian A.; Taylor, Moira A.; Alfredo Martinez, J.; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Handjiev, Svetoslav; Poppitt, Sally D.; Silvestre, Marta P.; Fogelholm, Mikael; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Berendsen, Agnes A. M.; Raben, Anne; Schlicht, Wolfgang (2018)
    Purpose: Onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is often gradual and preceded by impaired glucose homeostasis. Lifestyle interventions including weight loss and physical activity may reduce the risk of developing T2D, but adherence to a lifestyle change is challenging. As part of an international T2D prevention trial (PREVIEW), a behavior change intervention supported participants in achieving a healthier diet and physically active lifestyle. Here, our aim was to explore the influence of this behavioral program (PREMIT) on social-cognitive variables during an 8-week weight loss phase. Methods: PREVIEW consisted of an initial weight loss, Phase I, followed by a weight-maintenance, Phase II, for those achieving the 8-week weight loss target of >= 8% from initial bodyweight. Overweight and obese (BMI >= 25 kg/m(2))individuals aged 25 to 70 years with confirmed pre-diabetes were enrolled. Uni- and multivariate statistical methods were deployed to explore differences in intentions, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancies between those who achieved the target weight loss ("achievers") and those who did not ("non-achievers"). Results: At the beginning of Phase I, no significant differences in intentions, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies between "achievers" (1,857) and "non-achievers" (163) were found. "Non-achievers" tended to be younger, live with child/ren, and attended the PREMIT sessions less frequently. At the end of Phase I, "achievers" reported higher intentions (healthy eating chi(2)((1))=2.57; P <0.008, exercising chi(2)((1))=0.66; P <0.008), self-efficacy (F-(2;1970)=10.27, P Conclusion: Although statistically significant, effect sizes observed between the two groups were small. Behavior change, however, is multi-determined. Over a period of time, even small differences may make a cumulative effect. Being successful in behavior change requires that the "new" behavior is implemented time after time until it becomes a habit. Therefore, having even slightly higher self-efficacy, positive outcome expectancies and intentions may over time result in considerably improved chances to achieve long-term lifestyle changes.
  • Siren, Kenneth (2018)
    The aim of this research is to examine the role of disruption in an artistic process and the possibilities of utilizing disruption in contemporary theatre. The theoretical starting point is John Dewey’s view of disruption as the onset of all learning and problem solving, and hence crucial for all pedagogy and education. The two research questions are: (1) in what ways could disruption be made a more central, productive, and visible element of an artistic process by means of contemporary theatre practices, and (2) what kind of a theatre performance results from an artistic process which aims to provide the audience with experiences of disruption? The basis of this research is the artistic process of the devised theatre performance Names of Plants, as well as its four performances. A group of nine performers, aged 19–48, and myself as the director experimented with various contemporary theatre practices used to create potential for disruption for the participants. An added pedagogical dimension to the process was acknowledging the gender diversity in the group as some of the participants and the author do not identify with binary terms for gender. The resulting performance, staged in an art gallery, was devised from the ideas, elements, autobiographical accounts, and movement sequences which originated in these exercises and practices. The artistic outcomes were created with the aim that the members of the audience would have possibilities to experience disruptions. Material for this practice-led research was collected in a research diary, through questionnaires to the participants and by an exit questionnaire to the audience. The theatre practices used turned out to have different results in cultivating experiences of disruption. Particularly fruitful were exercises that didn’t provide a clear model of a successful completion but rather allowed for the unexpected to happen. Both primarily physical and primarily verbal approaches seemed to produce disruptions and recollections of past moments of disruption. Other useful means included shifting the rehearsal structure multiple times. Some disruptions arose from the concrete aspects of the rehearsal situation itself; some of these fed the creativity while others caused tension and stress. Focusing on experiencing disruptions seems to have fostered a warm, caring atmosphere and acceptance towards mistakes, unfinishedness, and individuality. Aiming to provide the audience with experiences of disruption, Names of Plants combined a collage-like collection of elements with a unified, cohesive aesthetic quality throughout the performance. The elements were created through collecting autobiographical material from the participants as well as crafting scenic ideas from the experiences come upon during the exercises. The collage-like structure allowed for a diversity of autobiographical voices and was intended to provide opportunities for the audience to self-identify with, to recall past unexpected moments, and to experience new ones. The audience members found various unexpected elements in the performance, even in the kind of artistic context where people expect to be surprised.