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  • Leppäniemi, A.; Tolonen, M.; Tarasconi, A.; Segovia-Lohse, H.; Gamberini, E.; Kirkpatrick, A.W.; Ball, C.G.; Parry, N.; Sartelli, M.; Wolbrink, D.; Van Goor, H.; Baiocchi, G.; Ansaloni, L.; Biffl, W.; Coccolini, F.; Di Saverio, S.; Kluger, Y.; Moore, E.; Catena, F. (2019)
    Although most patients with acute pancreatitis have the mild form of the disease, about 20-30% develops a severe form, often associated with single or multiple organ dysfunction requiring intensive care. Identifying the severe form early is one of the major challenges in managing severe acute pancreatitis. Infection of the pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis occurs in about 20-40% of patients with severe acute pancreatitis, and is associated with worsening organ dysfunctions. While most patients with sterile necrosis can be managed nonoperatively, patients with infected necrosis usually require an intervention that can be percutaneous, endoscopic, or open surgical. These guidelines present evidence-based international consensus statements on the management of severe acute pancreatitis from collaboration of a panel of experts meeting during the World Congress of Emergency Surgery in June 27-30, 2018 in Bertinoro, Italy. The main topics of these guidelines fall under the following topics: Diagnosis, Antibiotic treatment, Management in the Intensive Care Unit, Surgical and operative management, and Open abdomen. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Janket, Sok-Ja; Meurman, Jukka; Diamandis, Eleftherios P. (2020)
    We teach and practice ethical behavior with all clinical and research activities. Notably, we are well educated to treat the subjects participating in research studies with high ethical standards. However, the ethics of interacting with colleagues, or with junior faculty members, are neither well defined nor taught. Dealing with junior faculty has parallels to dealing with vulnerable research subjects such as children, mentally or physically challenged groups, prison inmates or army recruits. Like any other vulnerable population, lower-ranking faculty members are often at the mercy of department chairs or other higher-ranked faculty members. Herein we present some potentially unethical or unfair examples related to academic research. Our goal is to educate the academic community of conceptual paths and to prevent similar untoward occurrences from happening in the future. Unethical behaviors related to sexual misconduct have already been described elsewhere and are not included in this manuscript. © 2020 Janket SJ et al.
  • Saari, Sini; Kemppainen, Esa; Tuomela, Tero; Oliveira, M.T.; Dufour, E.; Jacobs, H.T. (2019)
    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase, AOX, present in most eukaryotes apart from vertebrates and insects, catalyzes the direct oxidation of ubiquinol by oxygen, by-passing the terminal proton-motive steps of the respiratory chain. Its physiological role is not fully understood, but it is proposed to buffer stresses in the respiratory chain similar to those encountered in mitochondrial diseases in humans. Previously, we found that the ubiquitous expression of AOX from Ciona intestinalis in Drosophila perturbs the development of flies cultured under low-nutrient conditions (media containing only glucose and yeast). Here we tested the effects of a wide range of nutritional supplements on Drosophila development, to gain insight into the physiological mechanism underlying this developmental failure. On low-nutrient medium, larvae contained decreased amounts of triglycerides, lactate, and pyruvate, irrespective of AOX expression. Complex food supplements, including treacle (molasses), restored normal development to AOX-expressing flies, but many individual additives did not. Inhibition of AOX by treacle extract was excluded as a mechanism, since the supplement did not alter the enzymatic activity of AOX in vitro. Furthermore, antibiotics did not influence the organismal phenotype, indicating that commensal microbes were not involved. Fractionation of treacle identified a water-soluble fraction with low solubility in ethanol, rich in lactate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, which contained the critical activity. We propose that the partial activation of AOX during metamorphosis impairs the efficient use of stored metabolites, resulting in developmental failure. © 2019 The Authors. Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • Sagath, L.; Lehtokari, V.-L.; Välipakka, S.; Udd, B.; Wallgren-Pettersson, C.; Pelin, K.; Kiiski, K. (2018)
    Background: Our previous array, the Comparative Genomic Hybridisation design (CGH-array) for nemaline myopathy (NM), named the NM-CGH array, revealed pathogenic copy number variation (CNV) in the genes for nebulin (NEB) and tropomyosin 3 (TPM3), as well as recurrent CNVs in the segmental duplication (SD), i.e. triplicate, region of NEB (TRI, exons 82-89, 90-97, 98-105). In the light of this knowledge, we have designed and validated an extended CGH array, which includes a selection of 187 genes known to cause neuromuscular disorders (NMDs). Objective: Our aim was to develop a reliable method for CNV detection in genes related to neuromuscular disorders for routine mutation detection and analysis, as a much-needed complement to sequencing methods. Methods: We have developed a novel custom-made 4×180 k CGH array for the diagnostics of NMDs. It includes the same tiled ultra-high density coverage of the 12 known or putative NM genes as our 8×60 k NM-CGH-array but also comprises a selection of 175 additional genes associated with NMDs, including titin (TTN), at a high to very high coverage. The genes were divided into three coverage groups according to known and potential pathogenicity in neuromuscular disorders. Results: The array detected known and putative CNVs in all three gene coverage groups, including the repetitive regions of NEB and TTN. Conclusions: The targeted neuromuscular disorder 4×180 k array-CGH (NMD-CGH-array v1.0) design allows CNV detection for a broader spectrum of neuromuscular disorders at a high resolution. © 2018 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
  • Meemken, Marie-Theres; Horstmann, Annette (2019)
    Altered eating behavior due to modern, food-enriched environments has a share in the recent obesity upsurge, though the exact mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to assess whether higher weight or weight gain are related to stronger effects of external cues on motivation-driven behavior. 51 people with and without obesity completed an appetitive Pavlovian-to-Instrumental Transfer (PIT) paradigm. During training, button presses as well as presentation of fractal images resulted in three palatable and one neutral taste outcome. In the subsequent test phase, outcome-specific and general behavioral bias of the positively associated fractal images on deliberate button press were tested under extinction. While all participants showed signs of specific transfer, general transfer was not elicited. Contrary to our expectations, there was no main effect of weight group on PIT magnitude. Participants with obesity exhibited higher scores in the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire Disinhibition scale, replicating a very robust effect from previous literature. Individual Restraint scores were able to predict body-mass index (BMI) change after a three-year period. Our data indicate that PIT is an important player in how our environment influences the initiation of food intake, but its effects alone cannot explain differences in—or future development of—individual weight.
  • Klimek, Ludger; Bachert, Claus; Pfaar, Oliver; Becker, Sven; Bieber, Thomas; Brehler, Randolf; Buhl, Roland; Casper, Ingrid; Chaker, Adam; Czech, Wolfgang; Fischer, Joerg; Fuchs, Thomas; Gerstlauer, Michael; Hoermann, Karl; Jakob, Thilo; Jung, Kirsten; Kopp, Matthias V.; Mahler, Vera; Merk, Hans; Muelleneisen, Norbert; Nemat, Katja; Rabe, Uta; Ring, Johannes; Saloga, Joachim; Schlenter, Wolfgang; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Seyfarth, Holger; Sperl, Annette; Spindler, Thomas; Staubach, Petra; Strieth, Sebastian; Treudler, Regina; Vogelberg, Christian; Wallrafen, Andrea; Wehrmann, Wolfgang; Wrede, Holger; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bedbrook, Anna; Canonica, Giorgio W.; Cardona, Victoria; Casale, Thomas B.; Czarlewski, Wienczylawa; Fokkens, Wytske J.; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellings, Peter W.; Jutel, Marek; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree; Mullol, Joaquim; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Werfel, Thomas; Bousquet, Jean (2019)
  • Tiškina, Valentina; Lindqvist, E.-L.; Blomqvist, A.-C.; Orav, Merle; Stensvold, C.R.; Jokelainen, P. (2019)
    Angiostrongylus vasorum has spread farther north in Europe. In this study, two autochthonous findings from dogs from Finland are described: In February 2014, the infection was diagnosed in a 10-month-old labrador retriever, and in February 2017, in a three-year-old French bulldog. These diagnoses were based on direct detection of the larvae from faeces of the dogs. The dogs had no history of travel to or import from abroad; the first lived in Southern Finland and the other in Western Finland, about 150 km apart. The dogs had no clinical signs attributable to angiostrongylosis. An online questionnaire was used to survey the extent to which veterinarians in Finland have self-reportedly observed canine A vasorum infections. A total of 38 veterinarians authorised to work in Finland answered the questionnaire in December 2017, and 9 (24%) of them reported having seen one or more dogs with A vasorum infection in Finland. The results suggest that at least five individual dogs with A vasorum infection would have been seen in Finland, three of which had an apparently autochthonous infection. While the geographical distribution of A vasorum in Finland remains largely unknown, findings have started to appear from domestic dogs. It remains possible that some veterinarians could have misdiagnosed, for example, Crenosoma vulpis larvae as those of A vasorum, and the findings without confirmation using antigen test could be due to coprophagy and passage of ingested larvae; however, this does not change the main conclusion that can be made: A vasorum is already multifocally present in Finland. Increasing awareness about A vasorum is important in areas where it is emerging and spreading. © 2019 British Veterinary Association.
  • Chandola, C.; Casteleijn, M.G.; Chandola, U.M.; Gopalan, L.N.; Urtti, A.; Neerathilingam, M. (2019)
    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that leads to the severe loss of central vision in elderlies. The health of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is critical for the onset of AMD. Chronic oxidative stress along with loss of lysosomal activity is a major cause for RPE cell death during AMD. Hence, development of a molecule for targeted lysosomal delivery of therapeutic protein/drugs in RPE cells is important to prevent RPE cell death during AMD. Using human RPE cell line (ARPE-19 cells) as a study model, we confirmed that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced oxidative stress results in CD44 cell surface receptor overexpression in RPE cells; hence, an important target for specific delivery to RPE cells during oxidative stress. We also demonstrate that the known nucleic acid CD44 aptamer - conjugated with a fluorescent probe (FITC) - is delivered into the lysosomes of CD44 expressing ARPE-19 cells. Hence, as a proof of concept, we demonstrate that CD44 aptamer may be used for lysosomal delivery of cargo to RPE cells under oxidative stress, similar to AMD condition. Since oxidative stress may induce wet and dry AMD, both, along with proliferative vitreoretinopathy, CD44 aptamer may be applicable as a carrier for targeted lysosomal delivery of therapeutic cargoes in ocular diseases showing oxidative stress in RPE cells. © 2019
  • Miller, W.G.; Yee, E.; Revez, J.; Bono, J.L.; Rossi, M. (2017)
    Campylobacter cuniculorum is a thermotolerant species isolated from farmed rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Although C. cuniculorum is highly prevalent in rabbits farmed for human consumption, the pathogenicity of this organism in humans is still unknown. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the C. cuniculorum type strain LMG 24588 (=CCUG 56289T). © 2017 Miller et al.
  • Kondelin, J.; Salokas, K.; Saarinen, L.; Ovaska, K.; Rauanheimo, H.; Plaketti, R.-M.; Hamberg, J.; Liu, X.; Yadav, L.; Gylfe, A.E.; Cajuso, T.; Hänninen, U.A.; Palin, K.; Ristolainen, H.; Katainen, R.; Kaasinen, E.; Tanskanen, T.; Aavikko, M.; Taipale, M.; Taipale, J.; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Lepistö, A.; Koskensalo, S.; Böhm, J.; Mecklin, J.-P.; Ongen, H.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Kilpivaara, O.; Vahteristo, P.; Turunen, M.; Hautaniemi, S.; Tuupanen, S.; Karhu, A.; Välimäki, N.; Varjosalo, M.; Pitkänen, E.; Aaltonen, L.A. (2018)
    Microsatellite instability (MSI) leads to accumulation of an excessive number of mutations in the genome, mostly small insertions and deletions. MSI colorectal cancers (CRCs), however, also contain more point mutations than microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumors, yet they have not been as comprehensively studied. To identify candidate driver genes affected by point mutations in MSI CRC, we ranked genes based on mutation significance while correcting for replication timing and gene expression utilizing an algorithm, MutSigCV. Somatic point mutation data from the exome kit-targeted area from 24 exome-sequenced sporadic MSI CRCs and respective normals, and 12 whole-genome-sequenced sporadic MSI CRCs and respective normals were utilized. The top 73 genes were validated in 93 additional MSI CRCs. The MutSigCV ranking identified several well-established MSI CRC driver genes and provided additional evidence for previously proposed CRC candidate genes as well as shortlisted genes that have to our knowledge not been linked to CRC before. Two genes, SMARCB1 and STK38L, were also functionally scrutinized, providing evidence of a tumorigenic role, for SMARCB1 mutations in particular. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license
  • Honkanen, Tuomas; Mäntysaari, M.; Leino, Tuomo; Avela, J.; Kerttula, L.; Haapamäki, V.; Kyröläinen, Heikki (2019)
    Background: A small cross sectional area (CSA) of the paraspinal muscles may be related to low back pain among military aviators but previous studies have mainly concentrated on spinal disc degeneration. Therefore, the primary aim of the study was to investigate the changes in muscle CSA and composition of the psoas and paraspinal muscles during a 5-year follow up among Finnish Air Force (FINAF) fighter pilots. Methods: Study population consisted of 26 volunteered FINAF male fighter pilots (age: 20.6 (±0.6) at the baseline). The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were collected at baseline and after 5 years of follow-up. CSA and composition of the paraspinal and psoas muscles were obtained at the levels of 3-4 and 4-5 lumbar spine. Maximal isometric strength tests were only performed on one occasion at baseline. Results: The follow-up comparisons indicated that the mean CSA of the paraspinal muscles increased (p <0.01) by 8% at L3-4 level and 7% at L4-5 level during the 5-year period. There was no change in muscle composition during the follow-up period. The paraspinal and psoas muscles' CSA was positively related to overall maximal isometric strength at the baseline. However, there was no association between LBP and muscle composition or CSA. Conclusions: The paraspinal muscles' CSA increased among FINAF fighter pilots during the first 5 years of service. This might be explained by physically demanding work and regular physical activity. However, no associations between muscle composition or CSA and low back pain (LBP) experienced were observed after the five-year follow-up. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Kaipio, Johanna; Karisalmi, N.; Hiekkanen, K.; Stenhammar, H.; Lahdenne, P. (IOS PRESS, 2019)
    Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
    Patient experience (PX) is an important evaluation criterion for quality in healthcare. Compared to patient satisfaction, however less research has focused on the development of instruments to measure experiences of patients and their families. In the article, we describe the process of developing a PX questionnaire for the parents of pediatric patients in the context of children's hospital and illustrate the questionnaire items for measuring PX. The phases of the development process included retrospective interviews, description of the themes influencing PX and the metrics for measuring PX, as well as iterative development of three versions of questionnaires including data gathering and factor analysis. The final versions of the surveys suggested for implementation at the hospitals include eight PX statements for the outpatient clinic and five statements for the ward. Compared to satisfaction surveys, the developed surveys emphasize the aspects of parent's attitude towards the illness, support for families, and daily arrangements with a child patient. © 2019 American Psychological Association Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Jämsä, J.O.; Palojoki, S.H.; Lehtonen, L.; Tapper, A.-M. (2018)
    OBJECTIVES: To determine if and in what ways serious patient safety incidents differ from nonserious patient safety incidents. METHODS: Statistical analysis was performed on patient safety incident reports that were reported in 2015 in Finland's largest hospital district (Helsinki and Uusimaa, HUS). Reports were divided into two groups: nonserious incidents and serious incidents. Differences between groups were studied from several types of categorically divided information. RESULTS: Of the total number of reports (15,863), 1% were serious incidents (175). Serious and nonserious incidents differed significantly from each other. Serious incidents concerning laboratory, imaging, or medical equipment were more common. On the other hand, incidents concerning medication, infusion, and blood transfusion were less frequent. In serious incidents, the proportion of doctors reporting was greater, and contributing factors were better recognized, the most common being working of procedures. CONCLUSIONS: In the future, special attention should be given to the particular aspects of serious patient safety incidents, such as safe use of medical equipment, training, and handling of procedures. Root cause analysis is an effective way to handle serious incidents and enables the prevention of their reoccurrence. However, a systematic follow-up of the root cause analysis should be developed. © 2018 American Society for Health Care Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.
  • Correia, Ricardo A.; Ladle, Richard; Jaric, Ivan; Malhado, Ana; Mittermeier, John; Roll, Uri; Soriano-Redondo, Andrea; Verissimo, Diogo; Fink, Christoph; Hausmann, Anna; Guedes-Santos, Jhonatan; Vardi, Reut; Di Minin, Enrico (2021)
  • Lepola, P.; Wang, Siri; Tötterman, A.M.; Gullberg, Ninna; Harboe, Kristine Moll; Kimland, Elin E. (2020)
    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the marketing status of the new paediatric medicinal products listed in the 10-year report as initially authorised between 2007 and 2016, reflecting the product availability in four Nordic countries. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Setting Analysis of the national medicine agency's databases in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. Data source New medicinal products with paediatric indications and new paediatric formulations listed in the Annex of European Medicines Agency's EU Paediatric Regulation 10-year report. Data analysis The products were classified according to national marketing status between January 2019 and March 2019, whether a product was authorised and whether the product was marketed. Main outcome measures The percentages of the new medicinal products with paediatric indications and new paediatric formulations having a valid marketing authorisation and being marketed, both in terms of the sums of all countries and separately for each country. Results Across the four countries, 21%-32% (16/76-24/76) of the new medicinal products were not marketed. Of the new formulations relevant to children, 29%-50% (16/56-28/56) were not marketed, and a significant proportion of these products had never been marketed. Conclusions This study reflects the reality of the implementation of the Paediatric Regulation. The results show that several new paediatric medicines and new formulations are not marketed. This affects the product availability. Similar data from other countries are needed to evaluate the overall European status to find remedies to current situation and increase the availability of the medicines for children. ©
  • Komulainen, K; Pulkki-Raback, L; Jokela, M; Lyytikäinen, LP; Pitkänen, N; Laitinen, T; Hintsanen, M; Elovainio, M; Hintsa, T; Jula, A (2018)
    Objectives:The life-course development of body mass index (BMI) may be driven by interactions between genes and obesity-inducing social environments. We examined whether lower parental or own education accentuates the genetic risk for higher BMI over the life course, and whether diet and physical activity account for the educational differences in genetic associations with BMI.Subjects/Methods:The study comprised 2441 participants (1319 women, 3-18 years at baseline) from the prospective, population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. BMI (kg/m 2) trajectories were calculated from 18 to 49 years, using data from six time points spanning 31 years. A polygenic risk score for BMI was calculated as a weighted sum of risk alleles in 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Education was assessed via self-reports, measured prospectively from participants in adulthood and from parents when participants were children. Diet and physical activity were self-reported in adulthood.Results:Mean BMI increased from 22.6 to 26.6 kg/m 2 during the follow-up. In growth curve analyses, the genetic risk score was associated with faster BMI increase over time (b=0.02, (95% CI, 0.01-0.02, P
  • ALBINO Study Group; Maiwald, C.A.; Annink, K.V.; Rüdiger, M.; Benders, M.J.N.L.; Van Bel, F.; Allegaert, K.; Naulaers, G.; Bassler, D.; Klebermaß-Schrehof, K.; Vento, M.; Guimarães, H.; Stiris, T.; Cattarossi, L.; Metsäranta, M.; Vanhatalo, S.; Mazela, J.; Metsvaht, T.; Jacobs, Y. (2019)
    Background: Perinatal asphyxia and resulting hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a major cause of death and long-term disability in term born neonates. Up to 20,000 infants each year are affected by HIE in Europe and even more in regions with lower level of perinatal care. The only established therapy to improve outcome in these infants is therapeutic hypothermia. Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase inhibitor that reduces the production of oxygen radicals as superoxide, which contributes to secondary energy failure and apoptosis in neurons and glial cells after reperfusion of hypoxic brain tissue and may further improve outcome if administered in addition to therapeutic hypothermia. Methods: This study on the effects of ALlopurinol in addition to hypothermia treatment for hypoxic-ischemic Brain Injury on Neurocognitive Outcome (ALBINO), is a European double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled parallel group multicenter trial (Phase III) to evaluate the effect of postnatal allopurinol administered in addition to standard of care (including therapeutic hypothermia if indicated) on the incidence of death and severe neurodevelopmental impairment at 24 months of age in newborns with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult and signs of potentially evolving encephalopathy. Allopurinol or placebo will be given in addition to therapeutic hypothermia (where indicated) to infants with a gestational age ≥ 36 weeks and a birth weight ≥ 2500 g, with severe perinatal asphyxia and potentially evolving encephalopathy. The primary endpoint of this study will be death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment versus survival without severe neurodevelopmental impairment at the age of two years. Effects on brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging and cerebral ultrasound, electric brain activity, concentrations of peroxidation products and S100B, will also be studied along with effects on heart function and pharmacokinetics of allopurinol after iv-infusion. Discussion: This trial will provide data to assess the efficacy and safety of early postnatal allopurinol in term infants with evolving hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. If proven efficacious and safe, allopurinol could become part of a neuroprotective pharmacological treatment strategy in addition to therapeutic hypothermia in children with perinatal asphyxia. Trial registration: NCT03162653, www.ClinicalTrials.gov, May 22, 2017. © 2019 The Author(s).
  • Shulga, A.; Savolainen, S.; Kirveskari, E.; Mäkelä, J.P. (2020)
    Introduction: Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a combination of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) and induces plastic changes in the human corticospinal tract. We have previously shown that PAS consisting of TMS pulses given at 100% of stimulator output and high-frequency PNS is beneficial for motor rehabilitation of patients with a chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The therapeutic possibilities of this PAS variant for walking rehabilitation of paraplegic patients are unexplored. Case presentation: A 47-year old man with traumatic incomplete paraplegia (AIS D, neurological level T7) received PAS to his left leg for 3 months at 12 months post injury (PAS1) and for an additional 3 months at 24 months post injury (PAS2). The right leg had normal AIS scores and was not stimulated. Before PAS, the patient was nonambulatory, could not stand without weight support, and was consequently not eligible for conventional walking rehabilitation. After PAS1, the patient could stand for 1.5 min and take 13 steps (24 steps in follow up) on parallel bars without weight support and was enrolled into conventional walking rehabilitation. He achieved independent walking ability with a rollator. During PAS2, walking distance increased 2.4 times faster than during the preceding year. The left leg AIS score and spinal cord independence measure mobility subscore increased. No adverse effects were detected. Discussion: This is the first report of PAS with a high-frequency peripheral component that enabled and promoted walking rehabilitation. Together with previous reports on this technique, this result encourages further research into its therapeutic potential and mechanism. © 2020, The Author(s).
  • Pajunen, T.; Vuori, E.; Lunetta, P. (2018)
    Background: Post-mortem (PM) ethanol production may hamper the interpretation of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in victims of drowning. Different exclusion criteria (e.g. cases with low BAC or with protracted interval between death and toxicological analysis) have been proposed with no factual figures to reduce the potential bias due to PM ethanol production when examining the prevalence rates for alcohol-related drowning. The aim of this study is to verify the extent to which PM alcohol production may affect the accuracy of studies on drowning and alcohol. Findings: Unintentional fatal drowning cases (n = 967) for which a full medico-legal autopsy and toxicological analysis was performed, in Finland, from 2000 to 2013, and relevant variables (demographic data of the victims, month of incident, PM submersion time, blood alcohol concentration, urine alcohol concentration (UAC), vitreous humour alcohol concentration (VAC) were available. Overall, out of 967 unintentional drownings, 623 (64.4%) were positive for alcohol (BAC > 0 mg/dL), 595 (61.5%) had a BAC ≥ 50 mg/dL, and 567 (58.6%) a BAC ≥ 100 mg/dL. Simultaneous measurements, in each victim, of BAC, UAC, and VAC revealed PM ethanol production in only 4 victims (BAC: 25 mg/dL – 48 mg/dL). These false positive cases represented 0.4% of drownings with BAC > 0 mg/dL and 14.3% of drownings with BAC > 0 mg/dL and <50 mg/dL. Conclusions: The present study suggests that PM ethanol production has a limited impact on research addressing the prevalence rate for alcohol-related drowning and that the use of too rigorous exclusion criteria, such as those previously recommended, may led to a significant underestimation of actual alcohol-positive drowning cases. © 2018, The Author(s).
  • Fagerstedt, K.W.; Salonen, T.; Zhao, F.; Kytölä, S.; Böhling, T.; Andersson, L.C. (2018)
    Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a soft-tissue neoplasm most frequently found in the distal extremities of middle-aged adults. Most myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma are low-grade tumors with propensity for local recurrence after incomplete removal. We report a myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma which developed in the foot of a 41-year-old male and showed an exceptionally aggressive course with metastatic spread and fatal outcome within 16 months. We managed to establish a spontaneously transformed continuous cell line, called JU-PI, from a metastatic lesion. The JU-PI cells have a sub-tetraploid karyotype including the 1;10 chromosomal translocation and amplification of the proximal end of 3p; these features are considered genetic signatures of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Both the primary tumor and the JU-PI cells showed nuclear expression of the TFE3 transcription factor but TFE3-activating chromosomal rearrangements were not found. To our knowledge, JU-PI is the first established myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma cell line. JU-PI cells offer a tool for investigating the molecular oncology of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. © 2018, © The Author(s) 2018.